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Discussion Starter #1
I know that FSB stands for Front Side Bus, but what does it do exactly?

stupid school project's boiling my noobish comp. knowledge brain....
 

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Front Side Bus.. Basically from my understanding it carries data here and there... The bigger the FPS the faster your computer is.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Quote:


Originally Posted by Jori

Front Side Bus.. Basically from my understanding it carries data here and there... The bigger the FPS the faster your computer is.

could u be more specific please?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
what's the difference between RAM, memory, and FSB?

is it true that in A64 and P4 systems, the higher FSB the better?

and what does it mean by low timing memory boosts up performance?
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by Zipnogg

what's the difference between RAM, memory, and FSB?

is it true that in A64 and P4 systems, the higher FSB the better?

and what does it mean by low timing memory boosts up performance?

ram is the memory you buy to put in your comp (random access memory) you can get ddr, or ddr2.

memory is just memory in general, you have memory cards, hard drive memory size, or random access memory(ram)

and fsb is what connects everthing together that is on your motherboard, so it connects your northbridge, cpu, ram, southbridge, and all of the other components.

the higher fsb in the pentium 4 systems dont really matter, especially betwen 800 and 1066. though there is a big jump between 533, and 800.

in amd64 systems, fsb is replaced by HT, or hyper transport, which is basically the same thing, but at a faster speed. by getting rid of the memory controller on the northbridge, you have a faster system because the memory controller is on the cpu now, so you got rid of a hop between the memory-cpu bus.

memory timings are still only big factors in performance in pentium 4, and athlon xp systems. it is pretty much the delay time between the memory chipset and cpu.

in athlon 64 systems timings do not matter as much, as the memory is directly connected to the cpu.

memory timings play a big role in overclocking, which is the main purpose of this forum, the lower your timings, generally the higher overclock you can achieve.

memory is one of the most often overlooked item in a computer builders list, buying cheap valueram will limit your performance and overclock.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by Zipnogg

what's north/southbridge?

and what's PCP?

in pentium 4 and athlon xp systems, the northbridge is the chipset (intel 915, via, nforce2) it is the memory controller hub, and also controls the agp, on budget motherboards, it also has integrated graphics.

the southbridge is only present on p4, and XP, and athlon64 via chipset systems, it controls the kyboard, mouse, usb, and the pci slots.

on athlon 64 nforce systems, the south bridge is eliminated, because most of the load on the northbridge is taken off by moving the memory controller to the cpu. on nforce systems, the chipset is taking care of the southbridge+northbridge combined, just without the memory controller..

i have no clue what pcp is. sounds like a drub.
 

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isnt pcp an abuse substance???...lol i know it off topic just was like whoa...hey? when i read that
 

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your northbridge and southbridge control your PCI and AGP ports (northbridge)
your southbridge controls your ports i belive (IDE, SATA, IEE1394)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Quote:


Originally Posted by RunningRioT

in pentium 4 and athlon xp systems, the northbridge is the chipset (intel 915, via, nforce2) it is the memory controller hub, and also controls the agp, on budget motherboards, it also has integrated graphics.

the southbridge is only present on p4, and XP, and athlon64 via chipset systems, it controls the kyboard, mouse, usb, and the pci slots.

on athlon 64 nforce systems, the south bridge is eliminated, because most of the load on the northbridge is taken off by moving the memory controller to the cpu. on nforce systems, the chipset is taking care of the southbridge+northbridge combined, just without the memory controller..

i have no clue what pcp is. sounds like a drub.

lol, i'm sorry to confuse you guys with PCP.

Plague and I are doing a project together for school.

He wrote about PCP in vid. card section, so i was wondering what it was.

well, thanx for answering the rest!
 

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the fsb is kinda like a road connecting your components, the higher the fsb the faster data can travel between components. most components run @ a speed that is a multiple of the Fsb, some things like the PCI/AGP buses are affected by the speed of the FSB (unless their speed is controled by the BIOS/Northbridge) the speed of your CPU is a multiple of the FSB speed so increasing the fsb speed increases the cpu speed - OVERCLOCKING. this may require more voltage to allow the signal to run thru the cpu clearly (but more volyage = more heat and so better cooling is required as heat increases resistance in circuts and can caus an imbalance of electricity(volts) thru the processor so damaging it permantley)
 
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