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Old and Crochity
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
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Computed Tomography (CT) scanners are often the first imaging technology many patients encounter when doctors suspect serious disease or injury. The machines use a narrow beam of X-rays processed by a computer to create slices of the body and assemble them into detailed 3D images.

In 2013, GE introduced a new, superfast scanner called Revolution CT that allowed doctors to routinely obtain clear images of the beating heart, lungs, liver and other organs.
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The pictures, the resolution, and the detail are AMAZING. Yes please!
 

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Another reason why I am going into the medical field! Go science!
 

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Old and Crochity
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Of course knowing this country (U.S.) the price for a scan will be 10k so it's limited to the rich and no insurance policy will cover it. I'm sure that's the catch. It probably costs 20 dollars to do it and the setup for the machine is probably less than some of our folding builds.
 

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Originally Posted by Darkpriest667 View Post

Of course knowing this country (U.S.) the price for a scan will be 10k so it's limited to the rich and no insurance policy will cover it. I'm sure that's the catch. It probably costs 20 dollars to do it and the setup for the machine is probably less than some of our folding builds.
Unfortunately this is the sad truth. GE will charge millions to buy this machine and hospitals will have to overcharge patients or their insurance company to repay. Same thing with the DaVinci surgical robot machines. As a 3rd year medical student I've seen the hardship put on patients when they realize how much a scan can cost. There is also a lot of GE advertising in there "Local doctors said they were able to diagnose even the most challenging cardiac patients with erratic or high heartbeats" uhh.. tachycardia can be diagnosed for free by taking a pulse.
 

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Originally Posted by rubicsphere View Post

Unfortunately this is the sad truth. GE will charge millions to buy this machine and hospitals will have to overcharge patients or their insurance company to repay. Same thing with the DaVinci surgical robot machines. As a 3rd year medical student I've seen the hardship put on patients when they realize how much a scan can cost. There is also a lot of GE advertising in there "Local doctors said they were able to diagnose even the most challenging cardiac patients with erratic or high heartbeats" uhh.. tachycardia can be diagnosed for free by taking a pulse.
I'm a Radiologic Technologist registered in Computed Tomography (I perform CAT scans).

Like any other technology, CT scanners become faster and require less dose every year. This scanner is just a continuation of that trend. Hospitals periodically replace obsolete scanners and eventually this technology will be the norm, until it too is replaced by the next generation of scanners.
However, the 3D imaging shown in the article has been available on scanners for many years now.

The comment about tachycardia is clearly a reference to CT Coronary Angiography: a newer exam that allows imaging of the coronary arteries without the need for an invasive Coronary Angiogram. A shorter rotation time allows the imaging of patients with higher heart rates, reducing the need to medicate patients to reduce their heart rates.
 

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Originally Posted by erunion View Post

I'm a Radiologic Technologist registered in Computed Tomography (I perform CAT scans).

Like any other technology, CT scanners become faster and require less dose every year. This scanner is just a continuation of that trend. Hospitals periodically replace obsolete scanners and eventually this technology will be the norm, until it too is replaced by the next generation of scanners.
However, the 3D imaging shown in the article has been available on scanners for many years now.

The comment about tachycardia is clearly a reference to CT Coronary Angiography: a newer exam that allows imaging of the coronary arteries without the need for an invasive Coronary Angiogram. A shorter rotation time allows the imaging of patients with higher heart rates, reducing the need to medicate patients to reduce their heart rates.
The reason to obtain visualization of the coronary arteries is mostly to check for either stenosis or complete occlusion both of which can be seen at a resting heart rate. In fact you don't even treat angina unless it is unstable meaning chest pain without exertion and while at rest. Meaning giving say a beta blocker to someone with an acute MI then scanning them should elicit the same result as one undergoing a scan while acutely tachycardic . CT scans today are very quick as is as you know. This technology is great don't get me wrong what bugged me was the overly sentimentalization done by GE.
 

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Old and Crochity
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
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Originally Posted by erunion View Post

I'm a Radiologic Technologist registered in Computed Tomography (I perform CAT scans).

Like any other technology, CT scanners become faster and require less dose every year. This scanner is just a continuation of that trend. Hospitals periodically replace obsolete scanners and eventually this technology will be the norm, until it too is replaced by the next generation of scanners.
However, the 3D imaging shown in the article has been available on scanners for many years now.

The comment about tachycardia is clearly a reference to CT Coronary Angiography: a newer exam that allows imaging of the coronary arteries without the need for an invasive Coronary Angiogram. A shorter rotation time allows the imaging of patients with higher heart rates, reducing the need to medicate patients to reduce their heart rates.
thanks for the insight. I had no idea.
 

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Originally Posted by Artistar View Post

Millillion, so no retort?
I will do it for him. I am a business guy.

Volunteering to teach a kid the ABCs and handing samiches to homeless people is fine. Labor (or productive enterprise generally) is a commodity sold on the market to people willing to buy it. The best way to add net value to society is to provide a value added skill to the community and reinvest the profit.

You want to feed 1,000 people, don't hand them samiches. Start a farm (growing capital), grow food, hire workers (feeding people), sell food (feeding people with money) and use the revenue generated or excess crop to feed those that can't afford it.

You want to save the world from malady? Go to school, learn how, sell your labor to those that can afford it and give your labor and profit to those that you feel need it.

Crapping on people that aren't expending their resources in the fashion you think they should isn't remotely productive.

There are thousands of examples of people getting it right. Martine Rosenblatt, that guy that got Ebola doing Christian missionary work, St. Judes (Danny Thomas), etc.

There are also millions doing it wrong. They can be found sending tweets with #bringbackourgirls.
 

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Originally Posted by Darkpriest667 View Post

Of course knowing this country (U.S.) the price for a scan will be 10k so it's limited to the rich and no insurance policy will cover it. I'm sure that's the catch. It probably costs 20 dollars to do it and the setup for the machine is probably less than some of our folding builds.
I never understood the U.S mentality on this..How come don't they make it like most EU countries do (or at least ours does) that they already deduct a small amount each month from your salary (our employer pays it for us but of course the employer has already taken that into account when offering your salary in the first place) and you are covered for almost everything. (Just some minor and a little of major things aren't covered for us)

But this machine is great!
 

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Originally Posted by MadRabbit View Post

I never understood the U.S mentality on this..How come don't they make it like most EU countries do (or at least ours does) that they already deduct a small amount each month from your salary (our employer pays it for us but of course the employer has already taken that into account when offering your salary in the first place) and you are covered for almost everything. (Just some minor and a little of major things aren't covered for us)

But this machine is great!
Cuz anything remotely related to socialism is unaccepted in the US. 'Merica.
 

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I'm a radiologist,and I really wish we had a CT scanner like this at work....We have a 2nd generation 2-slice Siemens one....
frown.gif
 

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Old and Crochity
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
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Originally Posted by mAs81 View Post

I'm a radiologist,and I really wish we had a CT scanner like this at work....We have a 2nd generation 2-slice Siemens one....
frown.gif
One of my close friends worked for Siemens for close to 10 years he said most of the equipment he servied was older than he was. (We're both in our 30s) I found that to be very sad. Another buddy of mine, who is a chiropracter, had an xray machine in a storage building since he stopped using it. I asked him why he wouldn't donate it and he said because there was some negative implication (I forgot why) I felt like it was a stupid reason, not on his part.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darkpriest667 View Post

One of my close friends worked for Siemens for close to 10 years he said most of the equipment he servied was older than he was. (We're both in our 30s) I found that to be very sad. Another buddy of mine, who is a chiropracter, had an xray machine in a storage building since he stopped using it. I asked him why he wouldn't donate it and he said because there was some negative implication (I forgot why) I felt like it was a stupid reason, not on his part.
Yeah,Siemens reigns supreme in medicine equipment,at least in our medical group,but also in a big portion of the public health system..

They get a ton of money out of service contracts for medical equipment..
For example,as I mentioned before,,we have a 2 slice CT , but we use it at least as a 4 slice one which results in us buying a new X-ray tube every 6 months or so...
 

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Old and Crochity
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
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Originally Posted by mAs81 View Post

Yeah,Siemens reigns supreme in medicine equipment,at least in our medical group,but also in a big portion of the public health system..

They get a ton of money out of service contracts for medical equipment..
For example,as I mentioned before,,we have a 2 slice CT , but we use it at least as a 4 slice one which results in us buying a new X-ray tube every 6 months or so...
The way I understand it, from my economics perspective only, is that Siemens and GE own pretty much the entire medical equipment industry when it comes to scanners and xray machines.
 

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No real insight in how it works so my guess is it is just Computer tomography with more samples taken compensated by lot's of software. Nothing too special I thought this was the machine that some medical physicist hinted at as being the future of tomography though he also said that it would be years and might not be available for another 40 years just because of cost.

I crave more info about this machine. Rather than neat pictures.
 
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