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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all
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Just received a Gigabyte Sniper 3 in "excellent condition" in the post....

Upon inspection I immediately noticed a blown component between the audio front panel and the Firewire ports
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http://s263.photobucket.com/user/skummm/media/DSC000541_zpsdfbn1vxc.jpg.html

http://s263.photobucket.com/user/skummm/media/DSC000551_zpsxzpy5yqe.jpg.html

The location is stamped IF4 and the blown component is stamped P 1512 (I now think it is a 0.3 amp fuse).

Does anyone have idea what this component is connected to and what it will affect?

The board boots btw but I have by no means tested everything...
 

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It looks like a reseteable fuse for port protection (it is labeled as IF4, the F probably means fuse). Reseteable fuses are resistors designed for short protection. When there's too much current going though a port, they heat up, increasing their electrical resistance greatly to limit the current on the circuit.

The one on your motherboard probably was killed in action, protecting the motherboard from further damage. If you can't return the mb, they're easy to replace, if you have some soldering equipment. If you want to fix it, let me know, I can asssist you with that
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The firewire header has two 12V pins, so that's why there are two fuses.

 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the explanation
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Yep, I definitely want to keep this board if possible... decent Z77 boards are hard to find these days
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Firewire can supply a maximum current of 1.5A. PTC fuses have two important ratings, one is the maximum current guaranteed to not trip the fuse, and the other is the minimum current guaranteed to trip the fuse. 1.5A should be the minimum current guaranteed to trip the fuse.

You'll have to measure the fuse too, so we can look for the appropiate component size. Then you could buy some replacement from an electronics distributor, or Ebay.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Did some more testing today.

Can't test firewire as I have no equipment to connect.

However all PCIe slots are fine *but* the PCI slot is dead
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There is definitely power getting through but nothing I put into the slot is recognised.

Physically the slot itself looks undamaged.

Everything else seems fine, the only problem is I really wanted a functional PCI slot for my soundcard *clings on protectively to his Auzentech Prelude*

I measured the component: it is 4.5mm long and 3mm wide.
 

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Hmmm, PCIe slot not working is unexpected...

Your fuse component size is 1812 (0.18 x0.12 inches) or 4532 in metric. I think this part shuld work http://uk.farnell.com/multicomp/mc36232/fuse-ptc-reset-smd-24v-1-5a/dp/1861171 or if you prefer,, this ebay seller has some of them in stock too http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/5-X-MULTICOMP-MC36232-RESETTABLE-FUSE-SMD-1-5A-/272121524225?hash=item3f5bb4f001:g:IZoAAOxy5jxSa76X#shpCntId

Removing the component could be done in various ways. One straightforward method is to put a blob of molten solder, with a soldering iron, on top of the component. This blob needs to be big enough to touch the two extremes of the part in order to heat the pads where it is connected. When the solder connecting it to the motherboard melts, the component can be removed with tweezers, or the same iron tip you're using to heat everything up.

Another trick is to add some low melting point alloy to the pads of the component. The solder alloy formed will have a low melting point, and when you heat each pad with the iron, the solder will remain molten several seconds, allowing you to remove the component effortlessly. Check http://uk.farnell.com/chip-quik/smd1/removal-kit-smd/dp/1850214 It is useful for several repairs.

Of course, if you have a hot air gun, you can achieve the same result without spending on anything else.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It's not a PCIe slot, it's the PCI slot
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Also the component is stamped 1512 not 1812
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Is orientation important on this one do you think?

No heatgun available here but I could always buy one I guess...however the cheapo 2000w models on fleabay look like they will do more harm than good
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Edit: ok removed it and measured it with calipers... it's definitely 4.5mm long and 3mm wide.
 

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Quote:
It's not a PCIe slot, it's the PCI slot wink.gif
My bad, I'll do some research on the PCI slot signals to see if I can find something suspicious.
Quote:
Also the component is stamped 1512 not 1812 wink.gif
Components are never marked by size. The 1512 means 1.5A current capability and 12V. Also, many components carry no labels at all, so don't worry if you see the fuses with different markings, the ratings can always be consulted on the datasheet for the part. 1812 s probably the most popular size for surface mount PTC fuses.
Quote:
Is orientation important on this one do you think?
AS it is a resistor, it's orientation is not important.
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No heatgun available here but I could always buy one I guess...however the cheapo 2000w models on fleabay look like they will do more harm than good biggrin.gif
I think you're going to be fine with a soldering iron. And you're totally right about the 2000W gun, those are not for electronics work. You would need something like this http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/New-Desoldering-Unsoldering-Soldering-Rework-Station-Hot-Air-Gun-Kit-LED-Display-/201541852468?hash=item2eecd49d34:g:OtQAAOSwMzVTw37z
 

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Discussion Starter #9
OK folks, what's the verdict?

If I do repair this blown component, what are the chances of this restoring the use of the PCI slot?

Answers on a postcard to the usual address
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You could try to check with a multimeter if the PCI slot is getting 12V. It would be strange that the same fuse is used for PCI and firewire, but is not out of the question. Also check for bent pins. I can't be sure that replacing the fuse will make everything right, the motherboard might have suffered more damage.
 
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