Overclock.net banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,

So basically I done goofed. I bought a 7950 a few months ago and everything was going swell. I upgraded my mobo BIOS yesterday just because it was 3 years old, and I figured there might be some optimizations for my brand new graphics card. Well, the bios said it upgraded successfully, but then refused to post, even after resetting cmos etc. etc.

I went out and bought a new board, my old one was a p67 sabertooth b3. I figured hey, apart from screwing the BIOS up the board was pretty good. So I bought the Z77 version.

I kept all my old overclock values (took pictures before I updated the BIOS knowing that I would have to reset it), but now that it's come time to enter them again I'm having to give my processor more vcore on what (I assume) is essentially the same board.

I have a 2500k at 4.4ghz, and all the settings are the same except before I was doing offset -0.005 with a medium LLC and that was stable (20 runs of IBT, no blue screens at all since the overclock). Now I'm having to go Ultra High LLC with an offset of -0.040. The load voltage is now about 0.02 higher than before - I didn't want to keep the medium LLC because the vcore was spiking a bit too high for my liking after coming off load. It used to sit on 1.31v, now it sits on 1.33v full load.

Is this something to be expected between boards? Even similar ones? Nothing else has changed in the system. Full load on IBT I'm hitting 76*C max, which shouldn't be an issue at all. Don't really want to push the voltage up more...just disappointed that I've had to redo my overclock. I know that 1.33v isn't a particularly good voltage for 4.4ghz, but I guess I just got a below average overclocker.

Thanks guys
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Honestly, I think it probably depends on each board specifically. ASUS could have used cheaper parts in the Z77 version, or you just got a below average board. And yeah, I'd say something is to be expected between boards, due to the varying factors such as capacitors, power delivery units, manufacturing, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
I've been reading that different OC limits definitely exist for each asus board type. asus wants you to buy specific boards for good overclocking. I would call them and ask them what they recommend for a specific chipset, it seems they know these numbers.
 

·
Probably sleep deprived
Joined
·
5,585 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by abombthecoder View Post

I've been reading that different OC limits definitely exist for each asus board type. asus wants you to buy specific boards for good overclocking. I would call them and ask them what they recommend for a specific chipset, it seems they know these numbers.
The above posts are correct.

Different boards will have different power delivery systems/components and therefore different results.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top