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Caviar 640 gig can do peak of 110Mb average of 80Mb with HD tune. When i do a large file(8 gigs) it just keeps going lower and lower and lower and currently went from 80Mb to 26Mb transfer rate!! This is from my HD to my HD of copying a file to a new location.

So what gives and any way to help this?
 

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You're *copying* the file to a new location? So that you have two copies on the same hard-drive?

You will *always* experience slow(er) operation speeds if you are reading & writing to the same hard-drive.

If you are "moving" files, it would be near instantaneous since it's really basically just a logical move within the OS.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by Nick911
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Ah, makes sense, so basically when I cop from my drive to another it is super fast but when I do drive to drive its VERY slow?


If you are reading from one physical disk (or array) to another physical disk (or array), it is fast - the limiting factor would (most likely) be the write-speed of the destination drive. Although you *might* notice a slight performance decrease if either the source drive, destination drive, or both drives, are fragmented.

When you're "copying" the file on the same physical disk, regardless of partition, you're going to experience slower performance because the drive is reading and writing to itself. Performance will also degrade more if the drive and / or partitions are fragmented. The drive basically has to read in each chunk of information and then create a new copy of the same chunk of information, located on free space. With a fragmented drive, the drive heads are basically running around looking for all the chunks of information that make up that file, reading it, and then running around looking for free space to create the copy of the chunk.

If your drive is not fragmented, you minimize the need for the drive to be running around looking for the right chunk of data / free space. It will read the data sequentially, and write to sequential free-space.

When you are "moving" the file on the same logical partition, all you're really doing is changing the pointer to the file. For all intents and purposes, the file is still sitting on the same blocks / sectors on the HDD, but you're just telling the OS that those blocks / sectors have a different path (in the OS). Probably a better of of explaining it, but that's the best I can do at 350am....
 
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