Overclock.net banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,324 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I have one board that came with no Headsinks for the NVME m.2's. It's in a kids machine but both slots are populated and the c drive seems to run a little warm. Can anyone recommend me a some good low profile heatsinks? I like to stay away from the ones with silicon/rubber bands. Any advice would be welcome.
 

·
Not new to Overclock.net
Joined
·
78,991 Posts
So I have one board that came with no Headsinks for the NVME m.2's. It's in a kids machine but both slots are populated and the c drive seems to run a little warm. Can anyone recommend me a some good low profile heatsinks? I like to stay away from the ones with silicon/rubber bands. Any advice would be welcome.
How warm is it? What are you using to determine that it seems a little warm?

Normal safe operating temperatures for these is 35-40°C for most uses which is 95°F to 104°F. Under very heavy working conditions, it can go as high as 60-70°C, which is 140°F to 158°F. Most good NVMe SSDs spec the maximum safe to be around 70°C for a sustained period of time.

Most of us don't need heatsinks on our NVMe SSDs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
571 Posts


"JEDEC rates client SSDs with an operating temperature of 40C. If you force the flash down closer to room temperature (25C), then with the same amount of writing (done at that lower temperature) the end of life data retention time will be cut in half. An M.2 SSD without a heatsink will naturally rise above ambient. Same goes with SSDs with heat spreaders / heat spreading labels (they just spread the hat more evenly, which is actually better for endurance since the flash will also run slightly warmer even while idle).

Now for the heatsink / water block problem. The goal of these items is to prevent thermal throttling during heavy use but that is a controller issue, not a flash issue (flash loves to be hot while operating - specicifically during writes as that is what causes the wear). Where the heatsink / block makers get this wrong is having the thermal pad contact the flash. We want it to only contact the controller. Yes, the overall temp will still run lower (less controller heat conducting to the flash while idle), but at least during heavy writes, the flash will be able to rise closer to its preferred temperature without the heatsink actively pulling it back down to ambient.

This is far less of a concern for a showpiece system that is rarely writing, but I would still recommend trimming the thermal pad so that it only contacts the controller."
 
  • Rep+
Reactions: wuttman

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,324 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It's seeing 70c at times gaming so I see no downside in putting a Heasink on it. Summer is coming. This is on a WD sn750.
 

·
Laptop Enthusiast
Joined
·
9,398 Posts
So I have one board that came with no Headsinks for the NVME m.2's. It's in a kids machine but both slots are populated and the c drive seems to run a little warm. Can anyone recommend me a some good low profile heatsinks? I like to stay away from the ones with silicon/rubber bands. Any advice would be welcome.
Proper airflow matters quite a bit here too, I'd wager it matters more than having a heatsink for said M.2.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
571 Posts
I used one of these and cut the pad down so it only contacted the controller. The rubber bands decomposed quickly so I replaced them with kapton tape.


I think a more ideal solution would be to use one of these as a heat spreader with a full length pad -


That should keep the controller cool and the NAND warm. Kapton tape and a slab of copper might look a bit janky but it should work well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
It's seeing 70c at times gaming so I see no downside in putting a Heasink on it. Summer is coming. This is on a WD sn750.
70c is hot for gaming, it's a kind of temperature you'd expect from sustained writes, not the usual gaming workloads...then again, SN750 is a relatively hot drive.
I'd get a heatsink...doesn't have to be something beastly, qualty of the thermal pad matters more...
But do look into improving the airflow in that case first, it might save you the money for a heatsink.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
571 Posts
I don't get why copper plate should display different cooling behavior?
My thought is to spread the heat from the controller since it's the primary heat source and NAND lasts longer when it runs warm. The copper plates will spread heat better than aluminum, but shouldn't keep the drive too cool because there are no fins.

2487279


The temp sensor is in the controller.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
571 Posts
But it's thin, cross-sectional area of the aluminum one with fins should make up for halved thermal performance.
Maybe 🤷‍♂️

Still has less surface area though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,324 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
My Asus B550 board has heatsinks for both M.2 slots. Are they just for decoration or are they needed? Temperatures are better on that board but the case has better airflow also so I don't know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
571 Posts
My Asus B550 board has heatsinks for both M.2 slots. Are they just for decoration or are they needed? Temperatures are better on that board but the case has better airflow also so I don't know.
They might be needed to hold the drive in place, depending on how the board is designed. If you have some airflow around the drive and aren't constantly thrashing it with massive read / writes, then it's not needed. If the NAND sits higher than the controller, there's a good chance the thermal pad won't make even contact. I had that issue with mine before I cut the pad to cover the controller and DRAM. I just took the heatsink back off though. lol
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top