Overclock.net banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,539 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So I never really messed with my RAM before. I only overclocked it so I got a 1:1 divider.

Now I want to tighten the timings on my RAM just for a learning experience and maybe a tiny performance boost.

I have OCZ Platinum PC6400(Don't quote me on that PC6400 thing
) that is rated at 2.1v. My current timings are this: 5-4-4-15

Is there really a point in tightening those timings? They seem pretty quick already!

Thanks, and all help is appreciated!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,539 Posts
Discussion Starter #5

·
Registered
Joined
·
502 Posts
If you want to learn something, I would suggest trying them at loose timings what ever the default is, and then 5-4-4-15. Do a benchmark, and see what the difference is in performance.

Your increase in performance (negligible) vs an decrease in system stability.

Is it worth it?

Absolutely not in my opinion. Ram timings net VERY little performance gain. Speed on the other hand will give you more, due to an increase in bandwidth, but even this it little.

Research:tRAS, tCAS, tRCD, tRP, Latency vs bandwidth

Quote:

Originally Posted by Enigma8750
Ohh . BTW if you really want to Mess up your ram. Tazer it for 3 seconds.
Microwave will probably work well too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,539 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
It wont post on 4-4-4-15 (one continues beep) but I already have it up to 5-4-4-12.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
761 Posts
CAS Latency
Undoubtedly, one of the most essential timings is that of the CAS Latency and is also the one most people can actually understand. Since data is often accessed sequentially (same row), the CPU only needs to select the next column in the row to get the next piece of data. In other words, CAS Latency is the delay between the CAS signal and the availability of valid data on the data pins (DQ). Therefore, the latency between column accesses (CAS), plays an important role in the performance of the memory. The lower the latency, the better the performance. However, the memory modules must be capable of supporting low latency settings.

tRCD
There is a delay from when a row is activated to when the cell (or column) is activated via the CAS signal and data can be written to or read from a memory cell. This delay is called tRCD. When memory is accessed sequentially, the row is already active and tRCD will not have much impact. However, if memory is not accessed in a linear fashion, the current active row must be deactivated and then a new row selected/activated. It is this example where low tRCD's can improve performance. However, like any other memory timing, putting this too low for the module can result in instability.

tRP
tRP is the time required to terminate one one Row access and begin the next row access. Another way to look at this it that tRP is the delay required between deactivating the current row and selecting the next row. Therefore, in conjunction with tRCD, the time required (or clock cycles required) to switch banks (or rows) and select the next cell for either reading, writing or refreshing is a combination of tRP and tRCD.

tRAS
Memory architecture is like a spreadsheet with row upon row and column upon column with each row being 1 bank. In order for the CPU to access memory, it must first determine which Row or Bank in the memory that is to be accessed and activate that row via the RAS signal. Once activated, the row can be accessed over and over until the data is exhausted. This is why tRAS has little effect on overall system performance but could impact system stability if set incorrectly.

Command Rate
The Command Rate is the time needed between the chip select signal and the when commands can be issued to the RAM module IC. Typically, these are either 1 clock or 2.

Get memset, it lets you adjust your timings in windows.
If it doesn't like the timings then it will freeze, reboot and increase.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
761 Posts
memset
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top