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Herro there, well today i decided a home server could help me since filled 1.5tb's in 2 months D:. I need help with what parts i should use. All i know is i need 4-8tb's of storage.
 

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I will recommend the Hitachi 2TB drives. I have 12 of them in a server in RAID 5 and they're cheap (if you get them on sale), quiet, and have been reliable.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by stormwin11 View Post
Herro there, well today i decided a home server could help me since filled 1.5tb's in 2 months D:. I need help with what parts i should use. All i know is i need 4-8tb's of storage.
Any old computer you have lying around that you can leave running 24x7 is all that you need.

Otherwise, there's a bunch of recent threads in this Group that have dealt with this. Pick any AMD motherboard and a Sempron 140 processor or better, with a case that can hold as many drives as you need, and a PSU that can power that many drives, and you'll be good to go.
 

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The Hitachi's are very nice and the failure rates are low. If you're looking to save a few Watts, have a look at the Samsung F3EG and F4EG 2TB units. Since the server is for storage, 5400RPM drives are ideal.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by stormwin11 View Post
Herro there, well today i decided a home server could help me since filled 1.5tb's in 2 months D:. I need help with what parts i should use. All i know is i need 4-8tb's of storage.
Heya,

Well, you can convert any old machine into a network accessible/attached storage device. Or simply run a `server' which is nothing more than a PC that stays on all the time and `serves' up data to other machines over the network (be it wired or wireless, doesn't matter). If it's strictly for file storage, you can do it for super cheap with even the most lowly of hardware. You can get a few choice items to make any old machine into a modern NAS easily. Here's an example:

Converting old PC into NAS, Guide with Images.

Alternatively, if you have nothing old laying around, nor have anyone with old stuff to bum off, you can build a low power modern machine with plenty of room to stack it full of HDD's. The case is the hardest thing to choose on because of how many HDD's you think you may need in the future. So I suggest you don't skimp on the case--get something that has plenty of slots for drives. Other than that, a cheap case is... cheap. But it can still work. Lots of cheap cases out there with a lot of HDD space in them.

Here's a super cheap case that is good enough and holds 8 3.5" HDD's right away and can be made to hold 4 more easily (3x 5.25" bay converter to 4x 3.5" HDD cage). For a total of 12 HDD's in that case without any `mods.' The case. It's $20 with free shipping with promo code. Seriously, not sure why it's not sold out already.

Or if you want to get something high quality, padded for silence, crazy amount of HDD space, etc, check out the NZXT Whisper. Very roomy. More expensive. And if you need even more than that, it's going to just scale up to very expensive, very quickly. So there's a range for you at least.

Low power CPU & Motherboard option with plenty of SATA ports to get you started:

AMD Sempron AM3 45W CPU with Asus M4A78LT-M LE AM3 mATX - $82. Plenty of room to grow. Has all the basic stuff you need. Very low power for the power behind it. More than enough to run a server (even with a big server OS like Windows Server 2008 R2 or WHS, Linux, etc). But low power enough to be a good 24/7 option for a basic file server.

2 Gb DDR3 1333 memory - $50. More than you ever would need for this, but enough to run big things that you may want to in the future OS-wise. And of course, can be used in another machine should you scrap it, etc.

Antec 520W 80+ PSU - $60 (has an instant $10 off promo code, so $50 and ships free). Has 6 SATA connections right away. You can get Molex->SATA adapters later. A good quality PSU is important for an always-on-machine. And this will power it very nicely for a good price.

Samsung Spinpoint F4 2TB HDD - $120. You can watch for newegg deals some times and nab 2TB drives for around $100. Samsung and Hitachi are drives I would go for, WD being a close runner up after them. But basically add those kinds of drives as your space needs need it.

-- That's all you need basically. You can get a DVD drive or install your OS via USB flash drive, etc, so not really worth posting examples of that. Cheap, low power, but quality parts to last you what you need.

OS options for your needs:

FreeNas - See the thread link I posted early in this post.

Linux - Free, but may require some learning to set it up. Ubuntu, Mint, etc, are good starter distros for people not used to linux.

Windows flavors - Any windows OS will do what you need. Xp, Vista, 7, Server 2008 R2, WHS, etc. If you have an old XP key or something, this is a good use of it. If you have access to student keys for Win 7 that's great. If you have an *.edu address, you can get server 2008 R2 for free from dreamspark (highly recommended). Or if you want to buy, WHS (windows home server) is a very good server OS for casual users who just need a nice setup that is easy to configure, maintain, and has built in redundancy that is better than RAID.

Very best,
 

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Quote:
Or if you want to get something high quality, padded for silence, crazy amount of HDD space, etc, check out the NZXT Whisper. Very roomy. More expensive. And if you need even more than that, it's going to just scale up to very expensive, very quickly. So there's a range for you at least.
I have this case you can fit 9 drives in it and it is a beautiful looking case. I use windows server 08 and it works great. Remote desktop makes it so easy to work on your server. Low power consuption is the most important concept for a home server. I have 9 drives and the rest of my system running on a 300 watt.
 
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