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Discussion Starter #1
I was an overclocker for about 10 years now-

but now i'm trying out net sec and python!

oh and linux- a lot of distro hopping w linux
 

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Discussion Starter #3
hey beers-
Quote:
Originally Posted by beers View Post

Anything specific or in particular on the net side?
I just finished my A+ and im just trying to figure out what id fit in doing-

I think i am shooting for ending up at a network engineer role.I haven't really had much experience in this sector.

I signed up for some online MOOCs in python and its been a pretty decent ride so far.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I actually got my A+ through those videos and the Exam cram book ( read it twice)

and seriously don't know where i fit still :-/ (i dont think i can code all day but i dont think the terminal is a scary place at all.)

also all the switching and routing jargon / cisco commands the material looks formidable.

Some people say not everyone is cut out to be a coder/programmer- but tons of people are flooding it from bootcamps and the like.

Sorry if that sounds loopy its been an issue that's been a struggle for quite a while now.
 

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No worries. These days it's becoming more of a requirement to know things like Python and similar. Software Defined Networking (SDN) is bringing a lot of coding to the networking realm. A good example is Cisco ACI (application centric infrastructure) where you can control various aspects of your networking gear via script or API. I think there's even an ACI toolkit provided that's all written in Python.

Personally I'd go with whatever is more interesting to you. It also doesn't have to be a black and white decision, you will have a lot more value if you develop both skill sets. It's also pretty common to reach a certain level of competence with a technology and realize that maybe you aren't so enthusiastic about it anymore.

I find R&S these days to be a pretty large snorefest. I used to think the same about VoIP but now I find myself trying to get back into a role that implements VoIP/wireless/sec.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I know a couple voip guys in Alcatel Lucent- thru PM's website-
they tend to do a lot of bash scripting and PBX or Voip stuff,
they even have their own tests but im sure you are well aware of that in some capacity.
I started python for mainly 2 reasons-
I thought it would upgrade my current career- like i could put myself as a ++ or something.
and also maybe it would make other coding languages a lot easier to comprehend and it did.
Might i ask what is R&S? <-- routing and switching lol
 

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I earned my Network+ a few years ago. I read the Official Study Guide by Todd Lammle. He's not only funny, he's an excellent technical writer. I didn't need the book to pass the test, but it was nice to know what was going to be on there before I went into the room.
smile.gif


My forte is, of course, wireless networking. Any questions about that, just let me know
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Discussion Starter #9
I actually have the Net+ 006 book in front of me i missed the 005 window- and have to start all over again but thats ok. ALso own the MM book but i havent gotten past like chapter 3, its really informative but its not for like long reading sessions

Sounds good coachmark2
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Discussion Starter #10
How is your experiences? like how long did you work in the industry before you realized- hey this is good for me could be a better question
 
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