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Even if I try to make my clocks stock (3.4GHz, no turbo) any vcore that is not auto-offset gets me BSoD's. I currently have a 4.4GHz OC with offset stable 25 runs in latest version of LinX, but CPU-Z reports my vcore as 1.416 (rather high for 4.4 since most people seem to have a 1.2ish range for that clock, but it's what auto-offset gave me) It seems no matter what value I put for vcore, if it's not offset it's a guaranteed BSoD.

Edit: Hmm changing some of the power settings seems to have made it 1.216. I was googling around and searching this forum for bios settings, I found a thread by a guy called r0ach, is there actually something to what he is saying or are power saving settings alright?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Z Overlord View Post

Even if I try to make my clocks stock (3.4GHz, no turbo) any vcore that is not auto-offset gets me BSoD's. I currently have a 4.4GHz OC with offset stable 25 runs in latest version of LinX, but CPU-Z reports my vcore as 1.416 (rather high for 4.4 since most people seem to have a 1.2ish range for that clock, but it's what auto-offset gave me) It seems no matter what value I put for vcore, if it's not offset it's a guaranteed BSoD.

Edit: Hmm changing some of the power settings seems to have made it 1.216. I was googling around and searching this forum for bios settings, I found a thread by a guy called r0ach, is there actually something to what he is saying or are power saving settings alright?
I had a similar issue in the past, in that my chip would do 4.5ghz at just under 1.34v on offset, but on manual I was getting immediate BSOD X101 even after tons of tweaks and with it set as high as ~1.365v. It makes me wonder if some CPUs just don't respond well to manual voltage.

This? http://www.overclock.net/t/1433882/gaming-and-mouse-response-bios-optimization-guide-for-modern-pc-hardware-2014-r0ach-edition

There is definitely something to what he's saying, you just need to keep in mind that, as far as I can tell, his guide is written with system latency as the utmost priority. I'd definitely weight the pros/cons before enabling or disabling a feature, and ideally try it both ways to see what works for you.

Power savings is a matter of opinion, and disabling it is basically better system performance at the cost of added system wear. Personally, I like EIST and C1E, and shut off every other power saving option, and always raise the Power/Current Limit (otherwise the CPU will be power restricted).
 
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