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I have a 2.8 GHz Northwood C 800 MHz Bus 512Kb L2 cache and I was just wondering if anyone else have the same processor and/or if you know how far it can be pushed with stock cooling (before overheated).
 

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Welcome to the forums.


On stock cooling, your OC will likely be fairly limited. Northys should be kept at or below 55°C under load, so unless you have very low ambient temperatures, the stock cooler will probably not give you much room for overclocking. You can get some aftermarket cooling for a reasonable price, though, and that should help you greatly.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Quote:


Originally Posted by Taeric

Welcome to the forums.


On stock cooling, your OC will likely be fairly limited. Northys should be kept at or below 55°C under load, so unless you have very low ambient temperatures, the stock cooler will probably not give you much room for overclocking. You can get some aftermarket cooling for a reasonable price, though, and that should help you greatly.

Ok, it lies steady on 53 degrees C after a couple of hours in Prime95. I guess its of for the computer store then
 

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CPU cooling has (more or less) four main components - 1) efficiency of heatsink on the CPU (for drawing heat from the processor) 2) amount of air flow generated by fan on the CPU heatsink (to dissipate the heat collected in the heatsink) 3) air flow in case (to get the hot air from the CPU and other components out of the case and cool air in) and 4) ambient temperature in the room (the cooler the air, the more capacity it has to take on additional heat).

Before you invest in additional cooling, check your case for obstructions to air flow. Cables, particularly IDE cables, are notorious for obstructing air flow. Once your cables are arranged efficiently, clean out your case with canned air or something similar. Dust on heatsinks dramatically reduces their efficiency. You can also add fairly inexpensive fans to your case to improve air flow if your case does not already have the full complement of fans installed. If your temps drop but are still just a hair high, some quality thermal compound such as Arctic Silver 5 might be just enough for you; it will enhance the transfer of heat to the heatsink. If your temps are still high, a new heatsink is probably in order.

I'm not sure what's easily available for you, but I would suggest one of the Thermalright XP products with a high capacity (preferably adjustable) fan or the Thermaltake Big Typhoon. Any of those will give you great cooling on your system.
 
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