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Edit- I have redone this guide(partially) with new pic's and such, changed title to less confusing, ect. If an admin sees this, please move it to the FAQ's when possible.

This guide is to teach you how to make the best copper/aluminum heat sinks ever! These are used to cool the memory on your video card or any other small chips. Here is a picture of a finished product.

The heatsinks have a copper base and a copper heatpipe that send heat to copper and aluminum fins for dissipation. I have tested these in a variety of ways, and they heat up very quickly when placed on a hot surface, and cool down very quickly when removed. They helped me get a 40% OC on my old video card (sry i don't have the temps, it was an old fx5200) These are also very cheap to make, and work much better than the "ghetto penny mod".They have loads of surface area (mine have about 10" square each) and near a fan, can move a ton of heat. Even as passive coolers, these things rock.

All you need is-
Some U.S. pennies made before 1982
Copper Wire
Empty Coke Can
Copper Paper(at your hardware store)
Copper Nails
Heres a picture of the parts.-
http://www.rigshowcase.com/img/35393kdt/9183.jpg
Heres the actual construction method-
Find a drill bit just barely smaller than the size of your copper nail. You will want a tight fit.
Cut the aluminum can into squares of aluminum. These will be your fins, so make them as big as you would like them. About an inch would be good.
Do not make them so large that they will interfere with each other when put on the chips. Use the drill bit and drill a hole into the center of the aluminum fins and through the center of the penny. You need three per heatsink.

Cut a square of the copper foil a half inch bigger than the aluminum.

Cut the wire into short lengths just long enough to wrap around the copper nail without the ends touching. You need 6 per heatsink.

http://www.rigshowcase.com/img/35393kdt/9185.jpghttp://www.rigshowcase.com/img/35393kdt/8479.jpg

Once these are prepared, put them all on the nail as shown in the following picture. Solder each piece with just a drop to keep it in place.



Once on, squeeze the wire pieces with the pliers to lock them into place. The penny may be hard to fit on the nail, you might have to use pliers or something to get it on.

The piece of copper sets atop the top aluminum fin and copper nail and folds over the sides of the top. Once you have this all on, cut the end of the nail sticking out the other side of the penny off and grind or sand the nail and the penny down to an even smooth surface. If you want, you can lap the bottom of the heatsink for best results.

http://www.rigshowcase.com/img/35393kdt/9186.jpg

http://www.rigshowcase.com/img/35393kdt/9187.jpg

Once the pieces are all on and soldered down, there is very good thermal flow between the parts, even between the nail and the aluminum fins.

Everyone that is reading this needs to make a set and give them a try. To those who are bashing my work, i appreciate constructive criticism. If you don't like them, tell me how i should make them better. Simply posting "OMG tat blowzes" proves nothing but your low maturity level. Most readers tend to ignore posts like this anyway.

If you have any comments or suggestions, shoot me a pm or post in the reply.
 

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...It actually doesnt have a copper heatpipe at all. And, they wouldn't work well at all with Zalman heatsinks, as air would have to flow parallel to the GPU card, not straight down, as is what happens with Zalman HS's, and other similar GPU HS's.

It just seems pointless, with the fact the aluminium fins make awfully poor contact with the copper nail, which isnt even delivering much heat for removal.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by thealmightyone View Post
...It actually doesnt have a copper heatpipe at all. And, they wouldn't work well at all with Zalman heatsinks, as air would have to flow parallel to the GPU card, not straight down, as is what happens with Zalman HS's, and other similar GPU HS's.

It just seems pointless, with the fact the aluminium fins make awfully poor contact with the copper nail, which isnt even delivering much heat for removal.
lol man why dont you just say his idea sucks!

I give you made props man good show great work!
 

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1) Are pennies even 100% copper anymore?
2) Instead of one or piece construction, there are multiple components. Hence, a lot of inefficent thermal transfer due to air bubbles and poor contact.
3) Is there really that much surface area?
4) No fan mounts?
5) Solder is usually lead and tin. Not nearly as conductive as aluminum and copper.
6) How is mounted on the chipset?
7) Are soda cans pure aluminum? Is there any coating on the aluminum?

A Thermalrigh HR-05 or Jing Ting Force would easily beat this HS.
 

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Got to say I have never seen that before...Which is amazing since almost everything has been done a thousand times over.....
.....But I'm going to have to stick with my Swifty MCX159 for my NB....
 

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I believe it was in the late 1980s that the pennys were converted to copper plated zink.

Interesting work though
 

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Yeah they used to be 95% copper and 5% tin? Either Sn or Zn... whatever, it was only there to harden it. I forget. Either way, I believe it's 1983 they changed over to the 95% Zn 5% Cu... in other words, copper plating.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I will try to answer all the questions-

Contact- There is pretty good contact between the nail and the aluminum, because it is a tight fit, there is the copper wire pressing both sides and the solder holds it well. This can be improved by using thermal compound before sticking together, but the fits are so tight, there is pretty good.

Fan mounts- These things are extremely small. Even a 40mm fan is way to huge.

Surface area- About 6 square inches for the model i made. You can add more fins or make them larger to get more.

The solder is just to hold it tight together, not for thermal conductivity(though it does help a bit).

Real world tests- So far the only tests i have done are putting it on hot things and seeing how quickly the fins heat up. When set on a warm fireplace, the fins warm up in about a second. I WILL do temp tests as soon as i make a few more to put on my old video card.

The aluminum can is very high % aluminum. It does have ink stamped on one side and you can lightly sand it with 400ish sandpaper to remove it.

Pennies- As i said in guide, pennies before 1982 are about 95% copper.

I am glad everyone enjoys it, and i hope i can make a few more in the next week or so and can post some temp tests!
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by AARDVARCUS
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This guide is to teach you how to make the best copper/aluminum heat sinks ever! These are used to cool the memory on your video card or any other small chips that need cooling. Here is a picture of a finished product.

This is NICE, NICE, NICE!!! Wish more folks would experiment and figure out a cooling system for themselves for their own environment (instead of a one size fits all solution that isn't).

Been thinking of building a case (no aluminum) and the idea of heatsinks have crossed my mind, too. One of my relatives is a bench jeweler, so has the tools to cut/drill/work various metals to spec.

Copper is excellent as a "grabber" of heat, but it also retains heat. Which is why the most efficient heatsinks are copper/aluminum combos (copper takes the heat in, the aluminum eliminates it [usually via a fan]). But I wonder if anyone has fashioned one out of silver or gold stock, yet? Silver is even better at transfering heat, and it's not terribly expensive (unlike white gold).

Furthermore, anyone with some time on their hands can cast their own forms for ramsinks,too. It's actually fun swinging a 6" stainless pipe around and around and around (cheap centrifugal casting). And casting these things ensures it's the height/width/length and weight you want. Heck, design your own heatpipes -- it's not rocket science, just trial and error.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Update- I am currently making a few more to have enough to test on my video card to see how much it helps temps. I will try to post more pictures in the next few days.
 

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now this would be a kick ass system if you had like 4 lapped pennies soldered together then a sheet of copper then a penny then a sheet of copper then a penny and so on

soldering everything would be awesome
 

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All the pics don't work.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I am currently trying to get the pics back up, i think something happened when i uploaded the pics of my new case.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Quote:


Originally Posted by Mootsfox
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A HR-05 SLI (the non-sli should do slightly better) is by far the best air chipset cooler on the market.

I don't think you understood what was meant by my somewhat confusing title, this is to cool smaller chipsets or ram chips. Unless you know how to mount 6-8 of those on top of a video card, then hats off to you.
 
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