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Old school
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At 272 FSB, running 1:1 would give you 544mhz memory. You can set this by selecting the memory multiplier 2.00.

Any specific reason you want to run 1:1? It will significantly drop performance running at a much lower memory speed.

1088mhz (your current) is much better then 544mhz.
 

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Iconoclast
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You're not going to get 1:1 unless you underclock your ram, or you run a 533MHz FSB. Setting such a ratio is easy, you make the real memory clock = the real FSB clock. On a gigabyte board, this probably means a setting of 2.00.

Anyway, 1:1 is the worst possible ratio to have on an Intel chipset. It's only used when the memory isn't fast enough to run a higher ratio on a given FSB.

Use the highest FSB you can, and set your memory to run near stock (or it's highest stable OC).
 

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PC Evangelist
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You cant really get 1:1 unless you get 533FSB with your E5200. Also it does not really matter with Intel CPUs.
 
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Have ur FSB at the same speed as ur ram. U could lower ur ram multi and raise ur FSB but that might get unstable at a point. a 1:2 ratio is fine.
 
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Old school
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Quote:


Originally Posted by Voltage_Drop
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Oh I did not know that, I thought it was good to obtain a 1:1 ratio. So you guys think its good where its at? And how did you come up with the 533FSB, I mean how do you know what to set it at for any given ratio?

1:1 means the memory speed and FSB are equal, thus 533 FSB equals 533 (1066 double data rate) memory.

Those Hyper-X modules you got probably run on D9 chips, so with 2.2v you could get up to 1150mhz. 1200mhz at 2.25 - 2.3v and so on. Best thing is to keep the memory voltage at 2.2v or below though, because although D9 chips are awesome overclockers they are also sensetive to heat and voltage.
 

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Iconoclast
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Real memory clock is half the DDR value (DDR does not change the clock, it just transfers twice per cycle).

You have DDR2-1066, it's rated clock is 533MHz. So to run 1:1 at the memory's rated speed, you'd need a 533MHz FSB. You are running a 1:2 ratio. 272Mhz FSB * 2 = 544MHz (or 1088DDR).

As for how you know what to set at, the answer is math. You just need to understand how your given board lists the various ratios. Gigabyte is rather odd and calls the 1:1 ratio x2.00 (they take DDR into account).
 

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Old school
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Quote:


Originally Posted by Voltage_Drop
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So if I set my FSB to 266FSB on CPU and my [email protected], then it would be 1:1?

No, 266 FSB x 2 = 533mhz memory at 1:1.
 
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Iconoclast
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There is no x4. 1:1 with a 266MHz FSB is DDR-533. This will be substantially slower than what you are running now, as far as memory performance goes.
 
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Old school
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Quote:


Originally Posted by Voltage_Drop
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Okay, so do you think its at agood ratio now, or do you have any suggestions?

I'd say the way you have it now is perfect.
 
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