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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is just a quick guide to transferring your used CPU block backplate to a new motherboard, or reattaching a used backplate onto a mobo. The WC community is usually pretty handy, so this may be below the 'average' crowd's needs, but I figured it may help someone.

Time required: About 5-10 minutes

Materials needed: 3M 4010 double sided tape, and rubbing alcohol

PART 0: Backplate Removal (New)

I had a couple PM's regarding removal of the backplate from the old mobo, so I figured I'd repost this comment I made from page 2

WARNING: I AM NOT RESPONSIBLE IF YOU BRICK YOUR BOARD USING PART 0's METHOD

The easiest method for me is to take a small flat-head (computer sized- 3.0mm or smaller) and wedge the stock adhesive pad away from the backplate itself. This way, you are actually removing the backplate from the adhesive pad, and not the pad from the mobo. Once the backplate is off, very careful work is required to remove the remaining pad on the mobo. Alcohol, the flat-head, rubbing, and VERY steady hands are required.

When you get to the point where the backplate is separated from the motherboard, what you want to do is use the flat-head as a 'shovel' to scrape off remaining sections of the adhesive pad. However, you don't want to scrape the semi-sharp metal object across the surface of your motherboard! Using the alcohol to take away the stickiness occasionally, you should be left with a thin surface of adhesive after awhile. Use your fingers (and possible very careful use of a 1.5mm flat-head) to rub off the rest, and you should end up with a clean motherboard.

Part I: Preparation

Ok, so you've got a WC loop, and you are about to change motherboards, what do you do? Well, after you have removed the backplate from the previous mobo, the first step is to completely clean all adhesive material left from the previous mount. This is best done with a small flat-head screwdriver, and rubbing alcohol from my experience. You will want to clean the backplate so that there is no residue left over, as this may interfere with the new 4010 backing we will be applying.

Once that is done, you will want to get out your 3M 4010 tape. This stuff is amazing, and is useful all over the house. 4010 will stick to just about anything it seems, while at the same time being removable with no left over residue.

4010 tape box


4010 tape roll


Part II: Applying 4010

Now that everything is clean, and we have our 4010, we need to cut it to size for our backplate. A single strip of 4010 does not cover the entire 'square' of a GTZ backplate (or pretty much any other BP I've seen), so we will need to cut a couple pieces to get the entire area covered.

Quick note on cutting 4010, the there are 2 easy methods I have found for this. First is to use a smooth ceramic/metal surface to 'hold' the desired length strip, and cut with a razor. With this method just make sure to clean the area you will be using with some rubbing alcohol (and let it completely evaporate), this will preserve the stickiness of the 4010. The second method is to use a sharp (and tight) pair of scissors. This will work just as well as the razor (or better), but half width strips can be a PITA sometimes.

An example of the 'mount' method



You will need one full width strip, and at least 1 partial width strip to cover the 'square portion of the backplate. In my case I used 3 pieces to try and make the fitment a little 'cleaner'. Depending on the design of your BP, you may choose to use 4 small strips of 4010 on the 'legs' for an even stronger mount. This isn't necessary with the GTZ backplate design as the legs are elevated above the mobo. I learned this after my first change!

4010 on BP with 'leg' pieces


Another small note on 4010 placement, you don't need to cover the entire 'square'. Because of the ridge design, the contact between BP and motherboard is rather limited. I choose to cover everything because it was rather simple, but you don't necessarily need to do the same.

Part III: Prep and install

Now that the 4010 is applied to the backplate, the rest is rather simple. All we have left to do is remove the protective cover from the 4010 and we are ready for install.

The best method for this I have found is to use a pair of small pliers to grab the edges without picking up the actual tape itself. You can also use a razor to slice a line in the protective cover, and then get a start on peeling with the razor blade.

Peeling cover off


After the peeling is complete we are left with a backplate ready for install. Once you begin peeling off the cover, you should be at a point where you are ready to place the BP on the motherboard, as the tape will pick up dust rather quickly (duh!). Of course, don't touch the tape with your greasy hands either!

Our peeled BP


The last step is to clean the back of the motherboard with some alcohol prior to backplate installation, this is just a final measure against dust. Now, you're ready to install your refreshed backplate and rebuild your system. I have had no issues using this method as far as fitment is concerned, and no mounting problems to speak of. If necessary, you can still use washers to space a lapped CPU, but otherwise you should be good to go.

Final product


Hope this helped someone, as I didn't really have a plan in mind when I switched motherboards for the first time with a WC loop. This isn't exactly hard, nor is it challenging to think of on your own, but it is nice to know that this method works without issues.
 

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I do not even bother. I just use duct tape. Nice guide though +rep
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by Lord Xeb
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I do not even bother. I just use duct tape. Nice guide though +rep

Duct tape is... conductive?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks all, I figured I had the pictures (I take pics of every rebuild), so why not share some knowledge.

Quote:


Originally Posted by 88EVGAFTW
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Not a bad idea, but I think that tape is the devil. It was not fun trying to pry the aluminum cover off my PSU, it felt like it was welded on there.

4010 is amazing that way! It holds VERY strong, but I bet once you got it off, there was absolutely no residue left over, correct?

I like the piece of mind in having a strong attachment, and I don't really worry about the extra 5 minutes it will take to get off next rebuild.
 

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I know this a guide is to reuse a previous backplate, my question how do you remove the backplate that is attach to the mobo? because i have a board that has an adhesive and i can not remove it, its really stuck and i dont want to damage the board.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Quote:


Originally Posted by Messymitch503
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How is taking the backplate off with that 4010 tape? It seems like it would be very easy to cause damage to the mobo from the force required to get it off. I've never done it myself so I'm not too sure, just wondering.

From my experiment, there was less force required for the 4010 than for the original swifty adhesive. Not to mention the fact that it takes about 20 minutes of VERY careful scrubbing/peeling to get the stock adhesive off the mobo.

Quote:


Originally Posted by ritchwell
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I know this a guide is to reuse a previous backplate, my question how do you remove the backplate that is attach to the mobo? because i have a board that has an adhesive and i can not remove it, its really stuck and i dont want to damage the board.

WARNING: I AM NOT RESPONSIBLE IF YOU BRICK YOUR BOARD WITH THIS COMMENT

The easiest method for me is to take a small flat-head (computer sized- 3.0mm or smaller) and wedge the stock adhesive pad away from the backplate itself. This way, you are actually removing the backplate from the adhesive pad, and not the pad from the mobo. Once the back plate is off, very careful work is required to remove the remaining pad. Alcohol, the flat-head, rubbing, and VERY steady hands are required.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by iquark
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From my experiment, there was less force required for the 4010 than for the original swifty adhesive. Not to mention the fact that it takes about 20 minutes of VERY careful scrubbing/peeling to get the stock adhesive off the mobo.

WARNING: I AM NOT RESPONSIBLE IF YOU BRICK YOUR BOARD WITH THIS COMMENT

The easiest method for me is to take a small flat-head (computer sized- 3.0mm or smaller) and wedge the stock adhesive pad away from the backplate itself. This way, you are actually removing the backplate from the adhesive pad, and not the pad from the mobo. Once the back plate is off, very careful work is required to remove the remaining pad. Alcohol, the flat-head, rubbing, and VERY steady hands are required.

Thanks did not think it was going to be a problem since i see alot of members able to resell there Dark Knight air cooler in the forum. Will give it a go. Also this thread is useful for the air cooling backplate reattachment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Edited

-added a section on removing the old backplate from the motherboard in response to a couple PMs I received.
 
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