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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone, I currently have 3/8 tubing on a compression fitting. I want to remove the collar of the compression fitting to take out the tube but I can’t remove the collar. When I attempt to unscrew the collar the tubing also twists and in result I can’t remove the collar. Can someone suggest a method to remove the tubing from the compression fitting. Thanks.

Here is a photo of what is happening:
Hand Automotive tire Gesture Finger Automotive design
 

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Try and get the tubing into a straight line if you can and it should screw off, if not you’ll have to unscrew the whole fitting and try it that way. Otherwise cut off the tubing, stick the fitting in a vice and see if you can unscrew it that way

What type of fittings
 
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All the compression fittings I have have 2 screws; top where the collar fits over the screw to hold the tubing and one on the base, which is thinner. You need to pliers, one normal size and one that has a thin nose but adjustable for big nuts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Try and get the tubing into a straight line if you can and it should screw off, if not you’ll have to unscrew the whole fitting and try it that way. Otherwise cut off the tubing, stick the fitting in a vice and see if you can unscrew it that way

What type of fittings
The fittings are 3/8 barrow compression fittings. The thing is I can’t screw out the fitting (the barb) because the collar is in the way
 

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do you have a close-up photo of the compression fitting that's causing you problems?
 
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Assume loop is empty then? Just pull the tubing. Depending on the compression, will be a bit difficult, but should be able to do, though would not necessarily recommend this method if planning to reuse said piece of tubing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Assume loop is empty then? Just pull the tubing. Depending on the compression, will be a bit difficult, but should be able to do, though would not necessarily recommend this method if planning to reuse said piece of tubing.
Yeah the loop is empty. I tried pulling the tubing but the tubing didn't come out, maybe I had to pull harder but I was afraid that something would break
 

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After you manage to get this off, I highly recommend getting intermediate fittings called "anti-twist" fittings. That will get you a M-F rotary fitting.


This should make your life easier next time. I wish I got these for my build initially.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
After you manage to get this off, I highly recommend getting intermediate fittings called "anti-twist" fittings. That will get you a M-F rotary fitting.


This should make your life easier next time. I wish I got these for my build initially.
I don’t think I will have to remove the tubing ever again after this time so I don’t think I need these. I never filled my loop, I finished building it yesterday and I didn’t like how some tubes looked so now I want to take them out and shorten them. I didn’t know it was a pain to get tubing out of compression fittings, If I had knew it was this difficult then I would have done the tubing properly from the beginning
 

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I've had some of those myself. My solution was to either try to hold the tube straight and firmly away from the fitting and screw the compression ring loose like it should do (albeit with a lot of force) or if I could get the tube loose at the other end, just use the tube and unscrew the fitting entirely, making it a lot easier to disassemble.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I've had some of those myself. My solution was to either try to hold the tube straight and firmly away from the fitting and screw the compression ring loose like it should do (albeit with a lot of force) or if I could get the tube loose at the other end, just use the tube and unscrew the fitting entirely, making it a lot easier to disassemble.

I was able to do this, but the collar still doesn’t come off.
 

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When you put the barb back on use the allen wrench and make sure it is tight. As long as it is tighter than the collar, it wont happen next time. I rads and metal blocks you can crank them down pretty good. Just do not get stupid with it. Anything softer than metal needs a bit more care and finesse.
 

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When you put the barb back on use the allen wrench and make sure it is tight. As long as it is tighter than the collar, it wont happen next time. I rads and metal blocks you can crank them down pretty good. Just do not get stupid with it. Anything softer than metal needs a bit more care and finesse.
It can easily happen again if the tubing isn't straight or it's a POS fitting like EK. I can show you like 3 of them that have sized up completely and will not come off no matter what you do.

Be very careful tightening the barbs with the allen wrench as you can also easily compress the O-ring and or tighten so it won't come loose. Finger tight is all you need, let the O-ring do it's job.
 
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I have never worked with any o-ring application where the o-rings was not to be compressed. Are you talking about possibly ripping it? You should be lubing the o-rings when you are putting the barbs in. Soapy water or light mineral oil are good options. I just wipe the ring with a q-tip to keep the mess down.
 

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I have never worked with any o-ring application where the o-rings was not to be compressed. Are you talking about possibly ripping it? You should be lubing the o-rings when you are putting the barbs in. Soapy water or light mineral oil are good options. I just wipe the ring with a q-tip to keep the mess down.
There's compressed and there's completely squished. You can easily over tighten when you don't have to.
Depending on the o-ring quality they can rip or deteriorate. As I said let the O-ring do what it's there for. Finger tight or maybe at best a half turn past is all you need. Any tighter and you'll run into issues removing it and or possibly compromising your o-ring.
 
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