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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When we look at computer specs, we can tell which parts are better for certain things. Likewise, we even go further to the manufacturing processors/components to tell which one would do a better job over the other.

Can you do this with headphones too? What can you look for to determine which ones are better then others based on spec and reviews alone? A lot of the time it is all perception and tastes on the sound itself. But are there things that you can look that guarantee you to buy a certain headphone?

I did this test where it went from 10-200Hz. I was able to hear half-way between 10-20 and all the way up to 200Hz. By my understanding, the human ear can only hear 20Hz-20KHz but it seems that you can actually (in my case anyways) hear sounds under the 20Hz range. Would a 6-24'000Hz headphones have the potential of making much richer basses then say a 20-20'000Hz rated phones?

Now I guess you can't rate specs alone, there is also the materials, design, etc. Quality of the parts, etc., even your own ear to consider. But is there a way to tell ones apart so that when you talk to someone inexperienced to the product, you can inform them in some way to help them pick good phones compared to the crappier ones?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by duocpu2.4 View Post
Be sure to have a good amplification driving them and listen! Consider that every headphone is suited for certain types of music.
Ya, is there certain characteristics that you can tell for ones that are better then another for certain types of music as well?
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Domino View Post
Ya, is there certain characteristics that you can tell for ones that are better then another for certain types of music as well?
A lot of aural pleasure is personal, we all have preferences that shape what headphones will appeal to us.

Needles to say, however, some headphones have definite and obvious benefits.
The simplest way would be to break the sound down to highs, mids and lows. Listen to each for clarity and detail. Compare it to other sets to notice the difference.
 

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Originally Posted by /Fail View Post
Nope. It's all personal preference. You can look up frequency response graphs on Headroom though, but they don't really tell you much.
The only thing they tell you is how it sounds like (what the frequencies are relative to one another) not the quality of the sound.

However you got to know how to interprete the graph as well.
 
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