Overclock.net banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
131 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey there

Now my system is just over a year old and I'm having a few PSU issues. The first time that the alarm was raised was during a LAN session when I got a blue screen saying

"A clock interrupt was not received on a secondary processor".

This happened twice during the LAN, but has never occurred before or since. At the time another guy was having PSU issues (wires were broken and he was trying to boot his system-PSU was connected to my surge protector). I would have deduced that his psu was shorting out and having an effect on my system.

I am familiar with the issues ppl seem to be having with quad cores and this BSOD. But I want to cover all grounds first before I blame the cpu

However since then I have been monitoring my rails carefully. Take a look







Notice the Vcore voltage and the Voltages on the rails. I have not intentionally done any OC'ing yet

Should I be looking for a replacement? Please assist

On a side note, shouldn't my Memory requency be closer to 800MHz?
 

·
Not new to Overclock.net
Joined
·
77,827 Posts
If those values were accurate, then your system wouldn't even be able to turn on. Software is usually inaccurate for measuring a PSU's voltages. However, if it's getting a good reading, then it can be relatively accurate. Unfortunately, this isn't happening for you. At least not yet!

Based on what I see in these screenshots, I have a question: do you have Quick Boot enabled in your BIOS? If so, then disable it.
 

·
Not new to Overclock.net
Joined
·
77,827 Posts
Quote:

Originally Posted by Lightning_Scythe View Post
I just disabled it. should something have changed?

On the plus side the bios voltages are closer to what is expected (1.375V, 3.34V, 5.03V, 12.25V)
That's pretty much the result I was expecting.


I'm also predicting that you may no longer see "A clock interrupt was not received on a secondary processor" due to this. The reason is because when Quick Boot is disabled, the DMI Pool Data is verified upon each and every boot as opposed to never being verified. The DMI pool data verification is just a quick detection of all of the hardware which helps software perform things like benchmarks and monitoring. It may also help with stability as well.

Here's a little bit more information:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desktop...ment_Interface
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
131 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Nice info.

May have been misinterpreted there tho. I mean to say that the bios voltages are closer to what's reasonable, both before and after disabling quick boot. I will keep it disabled however based on the info provided.

My concern is that yes one would expect a discrepancy in the software readings, but not THAT big a discrepancy. Especially the Vcore, 3.3V and 12V readings. One expects maybe a 5% deviation from the standard voltage, and anything outside that is indication of impending failure (at least this is my understanding)
 

·
Not new to Overclock.net
Joined
·
77,827 Posts
Quote:

Originally Posted by Lightning_Scythe View Post
Nice info.

May have been misinterpreted there tho. I mean to say that the bios voltages are closer to what's reasonable, both before and after disabling quick boot. I will keep it disabled however based on the info provided.

My concern is that yes one would expect a discrepancy in the software readings, but not THAT big a discrepancy. Especially the Vcore, 3.3V and 12V readings. One expects maybe a 5% deviation from the standard voltage, and anything outside that is indication of impending failure (at least this is my understanding)
So it finally started providing a more reasonable reading even before Quick Boot was disabled? That's really odd.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
131 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Just an update for those following- I'm currently using PC Probe 2 to monitor the voltages (since it is an asus board) and the readings are much closer to the bios readings. . dunno if i should congratulate ASUS for forcing ppl to use their software are curse them for making their products incompatible with other people's software, including AMD lol
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,038 Posts
Yep, that's pretty normal ... PC probe is the only thing that gives me proper voltage readings as well. Speedfan does the same thing for me. I don't think it's Asus' fault, it's the programmers of the other apps you use, not keeping them up to date with all the different sensor chips ... or just not being programmed right.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,520 Posts
All software voltage monitoring is worthless. Doubly so if your motherboard has garbage voltage sensors. Which yours does. Get a multimeter. Should cost $15 or less.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top