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Discussion Starter #1
Got my new ram in today, although 1 stick was DOA, I desided just to see what this ram could do(overclocking that is) At stock speeds of 667(333.5x2) timings were 5-5-5-15, so I knocked the timings down to 4-4-4-8, and set everything back to stock, then did some overclocking on the ram and CPU(CPU wasnt the target this time just the Ram)
I happened get a 19% increase in speed over the stock speed with tighter timings even. So this ram is running solid @ DDR2-800(400x2)

Not sure if this a good overclock but for me its the first ram thats went past 230FSB with my CPU(Im sure the mushkin I have can do well, but the board doesnt support its stock speed so I can only run 1-1 with the CPU. Heres a couple screen shots. I just wish the second stick wasnt DOA cause this is some good stuff.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16820144177
 

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Have you tested your memory in DOS with Memtest v3.2? Windows makes use of ECC and is not really a true test of memory error, rather it is a test of memory with ECC enabled.

Basically this means that your memory can be creating errors but the ECC (Error Correction Code) is taking care of it with multiple read/write/verify steps until the dram bit is correctly streamed.

This will slow down your system if it is creating errors and you don't know it. Memtest V3.2 on DOS boot (From CD) will ensure that you are not creating errors in Windows by disabling the ECC and testing.

Download the ISO from here:

http://www.memtest86.com/#download0

Then burn the ISO to CD, set your system to boot from CD and your DRAM will be automatically tested. If it passes 2 runs then it is clean at your settings.

Many people do not test in DOS and do not know that their system is creating errors.

R
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Quote:


Originally Posted by Ropey

Have you tested your memory in DOS with Memtest v3.2? Windows makes use of ECC and is not really a true test of memory error, rather it is a test of memory with ECC enabled.

Basically this means that your memory can be creating errors but the ECC (Error Correction Code) is taking care of it with multiple read/write/verify steps until the dram bit is correctly streamed.

This will slow down your system if it is creating errors and you don't know it. Memtest V3.2 on DOS boot (From CD) will ensure that you are not creating errors in Windows by disabling the ECC and testing.

Download the ISO from here:

http://www.memtest86.com/#download0

Then burn the ISO to CD, set your system to boot from CD and your DRAM will be automatically tested. If it passes 2 runs then it is clean at your settings.

Many people do not test in DOS and do not know that their system is creating errors.

R

Thats some realy good info, thanks Ill burn a disc and see what happens. Im sure its causing some sort of errors because of benching test, just came out a little odd. Im pretty sure its not capable of serious use as of now, but Im just impressed it actualy went that high with out any voltage increase. I dont plan on running it this way just wanted to see how far it would go from stock speeds. Ill be running 1-1 when Im done playing around with it. But thanks again.
 

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You are welcome. Good luck on the overclock and stability testing. It seems as though DDR2 DRAM is more forgiving or the JDEC standards are higher. Possibly all that the DRAM companies have learned with stability testing on the DDR forefront have transferred over to DDR2. Certainly I have seen DDR2 value and higher DRAM do much better than the stated ability.

R
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well after burning the image to a disc, my computer would not post, then it was posting alot of errors when it did boot. However the disc never did start in boot, just went right past it then crashed? Is this normal? I mean because I didnt have any problems prior to this. But Ive put the mushkin back in for now.
 

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You have to set your bios to boot from the CD? When you reboot, you can press the F8 key and select which device to boot from. Choose the CD/DVD and then memtest will run if you have burned the iso correctly. You have burned the ISO as an image correct? You can not burn the file as data or it will not burn either. You must choose "Burn Image" then browse to the .iso image file and allow it to burn as an image.

I can see no connection to burning memtest to cd and your system not posting.

R
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Quote:


Originally Posted by Ropey

You have to set your bios to boot from the CD? When you reboot, you can press the F8 key and select which device to boot from. Choose the CD/DVD and then memtest will run if you have burned the iso correctly. You have burned the ISO as an image correct? You can not burn the file as data or it will not burn either. You must choose "Burn Image" then browse to the .iso image file and allow it to burn as an image.

I can see no connection to burning memtest to cd and your system not posting.

R

Well Im not sure what happened but it didnt work, and yes I had it set to boot from disc first(Ive always got it set to that) I might not have burnt the image right but there realy wasnt any instructions on how exactly to do it. I Downloaded the image, extracted it, dragged it to the burner and burnt the disc. Disc says in the file ISO. Ill give it a crack later today. Thanks again.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Quote:


Originally Posted by Ropey

What program do you use to burn? You need to set the burn as an image, not data. If you see an .iso on the burned disk then you have burned the iso image as data rather than an image.

R

thats probably my problem, just using the regular burning software with XP. Ive never realy done much burning so Im kinda green when it comes to image's and what not.
 
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