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First off, hello Overclock.net forum members!

I am having an issue overclocking my i5 3570k to 4.0 GHz with an aftermarket cooler (Cooler Master Hyper TX3). The issue is my temperatures. I'm reading temps of above 80 degrees Celsius across all four cores, which I believe to be abnormal with the 1.112v core voltage it's currently set at. I recently just unconnected the aftermarket cooler then reattached it making sure all four feet were firmly clipped into the backside of the motherboard. The CPU paste is spread around well and not clumped up from a recent application about 2 months ago and doesn't look like an issue. The problem I think it may be is that my CPU cooler is ****ty
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Appreciate it forum members for the help!

Bios Settings:
CPU Ratio= Each core set to 40
Speed Step= Disabled
Turbo Boost= Disabled
GT over clock= Enabled
GT over clock Freq= 1150
GT over clock volt= +0.05v
Power save= off
CPU LLC= Level 5
CPU offset= -0.020v

 

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Hello I had a i5-3570k and had similar problems, have u considered "Delid" technique its a bit risky but it helped my temps because the ivybridge was renown for poor IHS thermal compound
 

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Which version of Prime95 is this? And can you try AIDA 64 stress test? That may give you a significantly lower temperatures if you're using a version of Prime95 that is newer than v26.6.

By the way, GT frequency, volt is for overclocking the iGPU (Intel Integrated Graphics). If you're not using it then I suggest that you disable intel HD graphics or don't overclock it.

Delid may be a good solution to lowering the temperatures. You can find the OCN guide here: http://www.overclock.net/t/1313179/official-delidded-club-guide

I myself used a 3D Printed Delid tool (Which is to be used with a vice) with Coollaboratory Liquid Ultra which is a liquid metal based thermally conductive and electrically conductive, so while it's one of the best for transferring heat from the CPU die to the Integrated Heat Spreader, it is risky to use if not applied properly. I personally find using the 3D printed delid tool to be one of the safest methods of delidding.

Pretty sure it's not due to the thermal compound being bad. It's more so due to the gap between the IHS and the CPU die itself. The black adhesive stuff they use makes this gap. Cleaning the adhesive makes the CPU IHS on level with the CPU die which would require less thermal paste for full contact between the IHS and the CPU die. This is why you see a temperature improvement. Another thing is that they (Intel) may not have put enough thermal paste to fill the gap between the IHS and the CPU die for the best heat transfer.
 
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