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I recently bought a Samsung SB27D590C 27'' 1080p monitor and I am not satisfied with the way it looks, and I know I have screwed up calibration settings somewhere along the way. I realize that Nvidia runs in Limited range HDMI as opposed to full range, and I don't have it set to full range right now. I was going to try this out, but was wondering if there were some truly easy and straightforward tools to use to adjust everything. The tool on OS X has always been something I have been able to use without issue, but finding something on the Windows side that is well documented with sample images and textual descriptions is hard. Windows display calibration is a joke, it has dithered low resolution images they cropped out of a setup video from Windows XP Media Center Edition 12 years ago. Most things I have found expect you to automatically know what you're looking for, and give a vague description. I have tried Calibrize and several online test images, as well as QuickGamma. I don't like the results of any of these. Help would really be appreciated.

Edit: Full range HDMI look like someone applied a heavy burn filter or something to all of my games. It's pretty bad. I have been meaning to switch to displayPort. Would this have any significant impact on color?
 

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I manually do it with:

http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/

I calibrated my brother's lower end Asus IPS monitor correcting the colors and white saturation levels allowing you to see the difference 251-254 white levels. The default calibration is terrible and the suggested calibrations from some guy on Amazon is all wrong. It is pretty amazing that I was able to get the colors to look almost as good as pre-calibrated higher end IPS monitors. You could really tell the difference in color after the calibration.
 

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Null
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Just get a Spyder5 Pro or Colormunki display. The Spyder Express and Colormunki Smile are a little too limited IMO.

IIRC the Colormunki Display is superior to the Spyders (all models: Express, Pro, Elite use the same hardware and it's worse than the Colormunki Display colorimeter)
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by geoxile View Post

Just get a Spyder5 Pro or Colormunki display. The Spyder Express and Colormunki Smile are a little too limited IMO.

IIRC the Colormunki Display is superior to the Spyders (all models: Express, Pro, Elite use the same hardware and it's worse than the Colormunki Display colorimeter)
The Colormunki Display uses the same sensor as the king of the pack, the i1 Display Pro. Just has different firmware to not allow it to be used with as many devices, and also is a bit slower to calibrate than the i1DP. But yeah. It is one heck of a good calibration device. Combine it with DispcalGUI+ArgyllCMS, and you can get one heck of a good calibration. And they trash the Spyder line.

Quote:
Originally Posted by anoob View Post

I manually do it with:

http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/

I calibrated my brother's lower end Asus IPS monitor correcting the colors and white saturation levels allowing you to see the difference 251-254 white levels. The default calibration is terrible and the suggested calibrations from some guy on Amazon is all wrong. It is pretty amazing that I was able to get the colors to look almost as good as pre-calibrated higher end IPS monitors. You could really tell the difference in color after the calibration.
You'll never be able to get a proper calibration doing it manually with that Lagom garbage. Just doesn't work. You need a good colorimeter to get proper color calibration. I wouldn't even call using that Lagom garbage an actual calibration tbh. A colorimeter is about the best thing you can invest in. You'll find out that you'll end up using it far more than just a one and done.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kinaesthetic View Post

The Colormunki Display uses the same sensor as the king of the pack, the i1 Display Pro. Just has different firmware to not allow it to be used with as many devices, and also is a bit slower to calibrate than the i1DP. But yeah. It is one heck of a good calibration device. Combine it with DispcalGUI+ArgyllCMS, and you can get one heck of a good calibration. And they trash the Spyder line.

You'll never be able to get a proper calibration doing it manually with that Lagom garbage. Just doesn't work. You need a good colorimeter to get proper color calibration. I wouldn't even call using that Lagom garbage an actual calibration tbh. A colorimeter is about the best thing you can invest in. You'll find out that you'll end up using it far more than just a one and done.
I have the Colormunkie Display and while it works with Dispcal after going through the 1 hour session where it scans every color, etc.. the .icc profile it creates is basically a blank .icc profile that is no different from before and after.. whereas the Colormunkie software .icc profile works but I find it to be far too warm.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kinaesthetic View Post

The Colormunki Display uses the same sensor as the king of the pack, the i1 Display Pro. Just has different firmware to not allow it to be used with as many devices, and also is a bit slower to calibrate than the i1DP. But yeah. It is one heck of a good calibration device. Combine it with DispcalGUI+ArgyllCMS, and you can get one heck of a good calibration. And they trash the Spyder line.

You'll never be able to get a proper calibration doing it manually with that Lagom garbage. Just doesn't work. You need a good colorimeter to get proper color calibration. I wouldn't even call using that Lagom garbage an actual calibration tbh. A colorimeter is about the best thing you can invest in. You'll find out that you'll end up using it far more than just a one and done.
So if I fix the white saturation after much tweaking the site is considered garbage right? Can't really call it garbage when I calibrated the monitor without paying $200 so you can actually see the difference in white saturation levels from 251-254 on a low end IPS monitor. It's not like my brother or I are printing professional color photos or are professional photo editors. I just find it useless to invest money into a device that I will use once and never use again. A colorimeter is the worse thing I can invest in if I am not a professional photo editor or are not going to need to perfectly print matching colors.

It's not very convincing when one reviewers title is:
Quote:
Oversaturated Reds, largely inaccurate for some colors, the earlier version of the software was a bit more accurate
$200 to calibrate a low end IPS monitor I'll pass up on that.
 

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Null
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anoob View Post

So if I fix the white saturation after much tweaking the site is considered garbage right? Can't really call it garbage when I calibrated the monitor without paying $200 so you can actually see the difference in white saturation levels from 251-254 on a low end IPS monitor. It's not like my brother or I are printing professional color photos or are professional photo editors. I just find it useless to invest money into a device that I will use once and never use again. A colorimeter is the worse thing I can invest in if I am not a professional photo editor or are not going to need to perfectly print matching colors.

It's not very convincing when one reviewers title is:
$200 to calibrate a low end IPS monitor I'll pass up on that.
When is the review from? And reviews of colorimeters are usually pitting them against high-end spectrometers so they're scrutinizing on tiny margins. The calibration a colorimeter gives you will still be far more accurate than anything you can do by eye.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by geoxile View Post

When is the review from? And reviews of colorimeters are usually pitting them against high-end spectrometers so they're scrutinizing on tiny margins. The calibration a colorimeter gives you will still be far more accurate than anything you can do by eye.
It's a review on Amazon for X-Rite ColorChecker Passport and due to typical Amazon shenanigans it's merged into the Colormunki reviews.

At anoob: If you don't think you need one, don't worry about it. There's nothing wrong with adjusting levels with your eyes as well as you can but, there's no competing with a meter if accuracy is the goal.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
These calibration tools seem a bit expensive for what I am trying to achieve here. Sure it will continue to be useful but I am not sure if that's an investment I want to make right now.
 

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Network Architect
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Discussion Starter #12
Quote:
Originally Posted by anoob View Post

I manually do it with:

http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/

I calibrated my brother's lower end Asus IPS monitor correcting the colors and white saturation levels allowing you to see the difference 251-254 white levels. The default calibration is terrible and the suggested calibrations from some guy on Amazon is all wrong. It is pretty amazing that I was able to get the colors to look almost as good as pre-calibrated higher end IPS monitors. You could really tell the difference in color after the calibration.
I mucked around with that for hours. It was too much back and forth for my taste and in all honesty I wound up with a worse end result than before. I have only really been good at calibrating televisions, not monitors anyways.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Diversion View Post

I have the Colormunkie Display and while it works with Dispcal after going through the 1 hour session where it scans every color, etc.. the .icc profile it creates is basically a blank .icc profile that is no different from before and after.. whereas the Colormunkie software .icc profile works but I find it to be far too warm.
Your display is either really good and where it should be if you're not seeing a change after running dispcal, or you're doing something wrong, i'm gonna bet on the latter because every display can benefit from a calibration even some professional grade ones. My colormunki display has served me well in the few months of owning it using dispcal.

Kinda regretting not getting the i1 pro for its faster speed, roughly takes me 2 hours to get a nice profile from dispcal, but i just leave and go watch a movie or browse on another pc until it's done, or better yet do it overnight
smile.gif
 
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