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Discussion Starter #1
So I just did a Windows 7 Reinstall. Set up User Account, no Guest Accounts, just me. Turned UAC off. For whatever reason though, I still have to right click -> Run As Administrator on several things, despite being an Administrator in User Settings. Also, performing many tasks say they require Administrator Access, but then they process just fine.

Confused.
 

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That's normal. Windows won't run things as an Admin unless deemed necessary, which can sometimes create inconveniences when an app isn't automatically elevated to admin perms. The most wise Microsoft did this to protect our ignorant little souls from accidentally doing something we didn't mean to on our computers.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by railfan844 View Post

The most wise Microsoft did this to protect our ignorant little souls from accidentally doing something we didn't mean to on our computers.
such a true statement.

if you really want to be the "super" admin you can unhide the hidden admin account, but your better of just using the one you made.
 

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You can also right click and go into the properties of an application. In there, there is a check box for "Run As Administrator"... I'm pretty sure it will still ask you to confirm when you launch the application, but at least saves you from having to right click every time. I know it becomes especially annoying sometimes when you launch it and forget to do it as administrator!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I had originally installed with the Stripped Image suggested here, but it took away W7 Firewall availability among other things (and, as a result, despite the Action Center being disabled, I still got notifications on every startup that the firewall was broken. I liked it because it only had one account, the Admin, and UAC never bugged me. But I had to reinstall to get the Firewall back, and that time I didn't use a stripped .iso I'm considering doing one more install. (To Re-RAID my 2 - 1TB drives), and use a restripped version but with the firewall and a few other services back.

I don't know. It's just sort of weird. I loathe how often W7 throws up notifications, whether it's the action center or Popups. I feel like XP left me alone far more often. It needs an advanced mode that doesn't second guess me every time I want to do something.
 

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Right click command prompt, run as admin, type net user administrator /active:yes
Use the admin account instead of the other one but be careful if making changes to permissions or deleting folders. Much less problems for me. Use your other account as guest account.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frankrizzo View Post

Right click command prompt, run as admin, type net user administrator /active:yes
Use the admin account instead of the other one but be careful if making changes to permissions or deleting folders. Much less problems for me. Use your other account as guest account.
You mean general permissions, or registry permissions? And how do you mean by deleting folders? About the only folders I delete are one's created by me, or ones that belong to programs that didn't uninstall properly. I can't say as I ever delete system folders. (System32, ho!) The worst is when Windows tells you you can't delete an empty folder because you don't have permission, even though you're the admin. (And there aren't even hidden files inside.)
 

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If you right click on anything you should see run as. Admin.

Becareful of deleting Folders and files that were previously hidden.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frankrizzo View Post

If you right click on anything you should see run as. Admin.
Becareful of deleting Folders and files that were previously hidden.
Kinda defies the point of being an Administrator though, if you have to right click on things and "Run as Administrator." Just adds unnecessary steps in my opinion. If I didn't want Admin privileges, I wouldn't have an admin account.

Take Linux for example. When I -sudo things, I don't have to type sudo every time afterward. With W7 admin, I have to either Properties->Run as Admin for each program I need, or rightclick -> Run as Admin every time I want it. It's just.... tedious. Reminds me of Zelda and Navi (or Fi) bugging me every time I want to do something.

"Are you sure you want to use your Sword?"

W/e

Just reinstalling tonight and slipstreaming it to force me as permanent admin.
 

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I agree i have run into a few problems where i have to log off and log on under the "super admin account" to fix or complete what ever i was doing. This also fix'es those folders that wont delete under the normal admin account even if you hit run as admin.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by joavery View Post

So I just did a Windows 7 Reinstall. Set up User Account, no Guest Accounts, just me. Turned UAC off. For whatever reason though, I still have to right click -> Run As Administrator on several things, despite being an Administrator in User Settings. Also, performing many tasks say they require Administrator Access, but then they process just fine.
Confused.
Why turn off UAC its fairly unobtrusive now and is actually one of the better security features of Windows7? And as everyone has stated. The "run as administrator" is there to only run programs you choose to with elevated privileges.
 

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i disagree. UAC is annoying as hell and there are several other reasons to run as admin. i have had many problems with "run as administrator" sometimes it just doesn't work.

Note that since the Super admin account does NOT have a password, enabling it without properly setting a password for that account will open a serious security opening on your system!

You can also enable it during the installation processes.

This method can be used during the installation process itself.

During the installation, after being prompted to configure the new user account, you will be able to set the new account's password.

At that phase, press SHIFT and F10 keys together. A Command Prompt window will appear.

In the Command Prompt window, type:

net user

Note how the Administrator account is there, yet the new user account has not been yet created.

To set the Administrator's account password:

net user *

Then enter the required password and confirm it.

To enable the Administrator's accoun:

net user administrator /active:yes

Close the Command Prompt window and continue with the installation process.

If you log off you will now see the Administrator's account as a valid logon option.
 
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