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im doing a science report on folding. can anyone help me? Its due on Tuesday for my School's science expo, and I have to also write down on the report something i tested and the results. can anyone help me out? ( I really need to do good on this report, i have a D average)
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by 6600Gt1047

im doing a science report on folding. can anyone help me? Its due on Tuesday for my School's science expo, and I have to also write down on the report something i tested and the results. can anyone help me out?

Well you can find all the info you would ever need here.

http://folding.stanford.edu/
 

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Discussion Starter #3
am i able to test something and show the results for the report? they arent real computer savvy in my school. should i also show on my report what reccomended setup i reccomend for folding like ram and CPU? ( They arent real computer savvy but i might get a better grade)?
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by 6600Gt1047

i have an intel motherbored so i cant oc. should i make up results or guess?


Folding is a team effort type thing. 1 PC by itself would not achieve much no matter how fast it is. I would focus more on that point and then print out the number of websites that fold, rankings page, how many workunits, how many people actually fold.

Then explain what a workunit is, how [email protected] works(it uses what ever resources are avaliable from your computer), how the ranking system works, how you get points for each workunit, work units are not all the same that they're all different cores, etc. and then you add some info about the discoveries stanford has done with the help of [email protected], and how we benefit from those .
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Evil XP2400
Folding is a team effort type thing. 1 PC by itself would not achieve much no matter how fast it is. I would focus more on that point and then print out the number of websites that fold, rankings page, how many workunits, how many people actually fold.

Then explain what a workunit is, how [email protected] works(it uses what ever resources are avaliable from your computer), how the ranking system works, how you get points for each workunit, work units are not all the same that they're all different cores, etc. and then you add some info about the discoveries stanford has done with the help of [email protected], and how we benefit from those .
That makes for a great paper but then he still needs to meet the "test/result" portion.
 

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Originally Posted by Bindusar
That makes for a great paper but then he still needs to meet the "test/result" portion.
Well he can just make that up...
Find some CPUZ screenshots, print one out @ say 2.4ghz, then the other one @ 3.0ghz. And say you did an specific core in this amount of time @ 2.4ghz and the same core in a faster time @ 3.0ghz.

It's gonna be really hard if you wanted to test it and not lie... You cant choose what core to get in [email protected] so it's probably imposible to test on the same core. And he has no way of overclocking so he cant change speeds.
 

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Originally Posted by Waffles
borrow 2 computers from the school. put [email protected] on them but make sure they are 2 diff speeds and show how the faster one goes faster.
You wont have the same core on both computers so the test will not really tell you anything.

In order to test you would need to have both computers fold the same exact core.
 

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how is this? Summary- Folding is a Windows program created by Stanford University in California. This program takes a computer's extra power that it is not using from the Processor ( The main engine of the computer) to study how proteins fold. This program is more of a team effort task. It takes thousands of computers to even get near folding many proteins. One computer alone cannot get much done on folding, regardless of its power so folding takes other computers power to all fold together. If we found out how proteins fold (Which is currently a mystery), many diseases that people die from today such as Mad Cow disease and Cancer would be cured. As more and more computers join, the more power the software has to study and examine how proteins fold more closely. Currently, about 1,400,000 million computers around the world fold (on occasion) and the numbers are climbing. As listed in the chart above. ( Note that these are an average of CPUs that fold regularly listed in the chart, not on occasion) Below, I also listed 2 screenshots that I took from my computer when its folding.
This is what the folding program looks like generally. ( The applications running in the background are seprate applications that have nothing associated with folding) Also, to do Folding, a computer requires a decent amount of power. If a computer has a processor known as a, " Celeron or Pentium 3," or below, the computer will not do a very good job at folding. Folding is reccomended to run on a Pentium 4 or above or a AMD XP or above with 256MB of ram of above to get decent power. ( Even a AMD Duron is good) However, any computer can do folding but the more powerful the computer, the more power goes to help experiment and study Proteins. ( Even a AMD Duron is good) his is how i wrote it so far. rate on a scale from 1-10
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Evil XP2400
You wont have the same core on both computers so the test will not really tell you anything.

In order to test you would need to have both computers fold the same exact core.
shhhh!!!!!!
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by 6600Gt1047
how is this? Summary- Folding is a Windows program created by Stanford University in California. This program takes a computer's extra power that it is not using from the Processor ( The brain of the computer) to study how proteins fold. This program is more of a team effort task. It takes thousands of computers to even get near folding many proteins. One computer alone cannot get much done on folding, regardless of its processing power so folding takes other computers power to all fold together. If we found out how proteins fold (Which is currently a mystery), many diseases that people die from today such as Mad Cow disease and Cancer would be cured. As more and more computers join, the more processing power the software has to study and examine how proteins fold more closely. Currently, about 1,400,000 million computers around the world fold (on occasion) and the numbers are climbing. As listed in the chart above. ( Note that these are an average of CPUs that fold regularly listed in the chart, not on occasion) Below, I also listed 2 screenshots that I took from my computer when its folding.
This is what the folding program looks like generally. ( The applications running in the background are seprate applications that have nothing associated with folding) Also, to do Folding, a computer requires a decent amount of power. If a computer has a processor known as a, " Celeron or Pentium 3," or below, the computer will not do a very good job at folding. Folding is reccomended to run on a Pentium 4 or above or a AMD XP or above with 256MB of ram of above to get decent power. ( Even a AMD Duron is good) However, any computer can do folding but the more powerful the computer, the more power goes to help experiment and study Proteins. ( Even a AMD Duron is good) his is how i wrote it so far. rate on a scale from 1-10
I think you should change the last part where you said the slow computers are no good.. You said in the first paragraph that this a team effort type deal it's not about how much power your computer has, so you cant come out in the last paragraph and say that a P3 or whatever is no good.

There's is no recommended hardware (requirements) for folding so that's false info...
 

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This isnt really much of a science project though... unless you were a research, you really dont know what kinda results and procedures and things go on in the labs... but maybe your schools dumb
 

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Originally Posted by Veto1024
This isnt really much of a science project though... unless you were a research, you really dont know what kinda results and procedures and things go on in the labs... but maybe your schools dumb

This is a simple research paper... He's not trying to discover anything, and I'm sure his teacher doesnt expect him to.

This is not a college paper, I think 6600gt is 14, so at that school level teacher aint going to be expecting in depth research.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
so get rid of the system requirements and it will be ok? 1-10? I need to get a 90 or up on this report otherwise no tecnolodgy high school
 

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Originally Posted by 6600Gt1047

so get rid of the system requirements and it will be ok? 1-10? I need to get a 90 or up on this report otherwise no tecnolodgy high school

You could just explain how a faster CPU folds faster than a slower clocked cpu, but how this should be a reason for someone not to fold... Every little bit helps.

And also you can include some news, not everything, just something specific that shows how folding helps. And remember to document it, if not it's plagiarism.
 
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