Overclock.net banner

1 - 20 of 286 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,126 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello fellow Haswell/Devil's Canyon overclockers!<br><br>
I <a class="bbcode_url" href="http://www.overclock.net/t/1411077/haswell-overclocking-guide-with-statistics/19600#post_26471219">made posts</a> in various threads on this topic but have decided to make a thread to keep information and testing from getting buried.<br><br><b>Summary:</b> The latest CPU microcode 22 (released in 2017) improves overclocking for Haswell over previous microcodes. I found this out accidentally, but have found the improvement over previous microcodes to be 100% reproducible, and another user has posted similar results. To update your BIOS' microcode and try for yourself, follow the simple steps in the spoiler below.<br><br>
So far this has been replicated multiple times by <a class="bbcode_url" href="http://www.overclock.net/t/1411077/haswell-overclocking-guide-with-statistics/19590#post_26448535">myself</a>, <a class="bbcode_url" href="http://www.overclock.net/t/1411077/haswell-overclocking-guide-with-statistics/19620#post_26473814">LostParticle</a>, <a class="bbcode_url" href="https://as.reddit.com/r/overclocking/comments/7gknrh/still_on_haswell_try_updating_your_microcode/" target="_blank">several users on reddit</a> and users in this thread. Reported voltage reduction for a given clockspeed varies from 0.04 to 0.01v with an average of 0.02v, depending on CPU and initial overclock stability. For some this is enough to increase their clockspeed beyond what was possible before, for others it means running the same clocks at lower voltages and temperatures.<br><br>
For me, I went from 4.7GHz to 4.8 at the same voltage of 1.3v, and got [email protected], a clockspeed that originally crashed with my motherboard BIOS' stock microcode 19 on starting a x264 stress test. I even found 5GHz to be within stable reach.<br><br><b>Steps for updating microcode:</b>
<a class="spoiler-link H-spoiler-toggle" href="#"><strong>Warning: Spoiler!</strong> <span class="spoiler-help">(Click to show)</span></a><div class="spoiler-hidden"><b>DISCLAIMER</b>: This involves flashing your motherboard with an edited BIOS. If you don't feel comfortable with this, don't attempt it. I take no responsibility for failed BIOS flashes.<br><br>
This simple process is done through the UBU tool and instructions found in this guide: <a href="https://www.win-raid.com/t154f16-Tool-Guide-News-quot-UEFI-BIOS-Updater-quot-UBU.html" target="_blank">https://www.win-raid.com/t154f16-Tool-Guide-News-quot-UEFI-BIOS-Updater-quot-UBU.html</a>. Either use the extensive guide found on the thread, or use the guide below.<br><br><br>
1. Download the latest UBU tool from the linked thread.<br><br>
2. Download MMTool.exe and put it into the folder with the UBU.bat file. A copy can be found here under the link MMTool (aptio 5): <a href="http://voltground.com/haven/threads/13/" target="_blank">http://voltground.com/haven/threads/13/</a><br><br>
3. Acquire a copy of your BIOS from the manufacturer's product support site or otherwise.<br><br>
4. Run UBU.bat and select your saved BIOS file. Once all the modules have loaded, navigate to the CPU microcode section by pressing 7 and enter.<br><br>
5. Press 1 and enter to navigate to the list of microcodes, type 17 for the latest broadwell microcode (makes no difference what you choose for broadwell) then type 22 for the Intel microcode (19 says it's the best for overclocking, but my testing says otherwise).<br><br>
6. Hit 0 to exit, then hit 1 to save it with a USB BIOS Flashback compatible name. If you don't have an ASUS board it will let you keep the original BIOS name or leave it as bios.bin to be renamed as necessary.<br><br>
7. *Back up your BIOS settings/profiles before flashing!* Flash the updated BIOS with your preferred method. While some motherboards allow the edited BIOS to be flashed conventionally, ASUS users must use USB BIOS Flashback to get around safety checks. Check online to see how best to update your motherboard's BIOS.<br><br>
If you have an ASUS board without USB BIOS Flashback, the only known working method to flash your BIOS is with an SPI programmer (£4 on amazon) <a class="bbcode_url" href="https://www.win-raid.com/t796f16-Guide-Using-CH-A-based-programmer-to-flash-SPI-EEPROM.html" target="_blank">following this guide</a>.<br><br>
You could also try updating your microcode in software and bypass the need to edit your BIOS, detailed below.</div>
<br><b>Newest Haswell Microcode 23 (20/11/17)</b> - worse OC potential than with 22 but protects against spectre hack:<br><a class="spoiler-link H-spoiler-toggle" href="#"><strong>Warning: Spoiler!</strong> <span class="spoiler-help">(Click to show)</span></a><div class="spoiler-hidden">Killkernel found and tested an even newer microcode, 23 dated 20/11/2017 that is not currently included in the UBU package. His testing found greater improvements over 22, <a class="bbcode_url" href="http://www.overclock.net/t/1643053/improved-overclocking-for-haswell-with-updated-microcode-how-to-update-any-cpu-microcode/70#post_26518497">check out his post</a> for instructions on where to find it. You can use the newer microcode by specifying the file through the UBU menu (make sure there are no spaces in the filepath leading to your microcode file, or in other words, put the microcode file on the desktop and go from there).<br><br>
So far I have found overclocking with 23 to be <a class="bbcode_url" href="http://www.overclock.net/t/1643053/improved-overclocking-for-haswell-with-updated-microcode-how-to-update-any-cpu-microcode/90#post_26519450">on-par or possibly a little worse</a> than with 22, with no additional headroom.<br><br><a class="bbcode_url" href="http://www.overclock.net/t/1643053/improved-overclocking-for-haswell-with-updated-microcode-update-cpu-microcode-through-software/100#post_26520652">LostParticle</a> observed a clear regression in overclocking headroom with microcode 23 over the previous 22.</div>
<br><b>Update microcode through software for Intel systems after sandy bridge</b> - Needs more testing!:<br><a class="spoiler-link H-spoiler-toggle" href="#"><strong>Warning: Spoiler!</strong> <span class="spoiler-help">(Click to show)</span></a><div class="spoiler-hidden">If BIOS flashing doesn't work for your board, try updating your microcode through windows instead. It will load the updated microcode at kernel load, so just as your computer starts to load into windows from the BIOS. It will override the BIOS' microcode so long as the BIOS' microcode version is older. It works with any SkyLake, Kaby Lake, Haswell, Ivybridge or Xeon equivalent motherboard/cpu running windows, but has not yet shown overclocking improvements in testing.<br><br><a class="bbcode_url" href="http://www.overclock.net/t/1643053/improved-overclocking-for-haswell-with-updated-microcode-how-to-update-any-cpu-microcode/90#post_26520338">In my own testing</a> I so far have not found software updated microcode to offer overclocking improvements as updated BIOS microcode does.<br><br>
A one-click tool to do this can be <a class="bbcode_url" href="http://forum.notebookreview.com/threads/warning-intel-skylake-kaby-lake-processors-broken-ht-on-laptops-pc-fix-is-here.806451/" target="_blank">found here</a>, along with links to guides to do it without the tool.<br><br>
Thanks to THEBOSS619 for the incredibly easy to use updating tool.</div>
<br><b>Motherboards reported as successfully flashed</b> (this serves as a general guide - similar motherboards will most likely work too):
<a class="spoiler-link H-spoiler-toggle" href="#"><strong>Warning: Spoiler!</strong> <span class="spoiler-help">(Click to show)</span></a><div class="spoiler-hidden">ASRock Z87 Extreme6<br><br>
ASRock Z97 Extreme4<br><br>
ASRock Z97 OC Formula<br><br>
ASUS Z97-P<br><br>
ASUS Maximus Hero Z87<br><br>
ASUS Maximus VII Impact<br><br><a class="bbcode_url" href="http://forum.notebookreview.com/threads/brainstorming-aw17-r1-ranger-r5-modifications.811433/" target="_blank">AW17 R1/Ranger/R5</a><br><br>
EVGA Z97 Classified<br><br>
Gigabyte Z87X-UD4H<br><br>
MSI Z97 MPOWER MAX AC<br><br>
MSI Z87-GD65 Gaming<br><br>
MSI Z97 Gaming 5<br><br>
MSI Z97 G45 Gaming</div>
<br>
I haven’t seen this microcode talked of anywhere else. I suspect it's because people lost interest in testing Haswell microcode by 2017 when 22 was released. In particular, this seems to be the reason why microcode 19 is stated to be the best for overclocking in the UBU tool, as not enough testing occurred to show 22's improvements. Good luck and happy overclocking! <img alt="smile.gif" class="bbcode_smiley" src="http://files.overclock.net/images/smilies/smile.gif">
 

·
El Rotten
Joined
·
222 Posts
im not afraid to experiment! only question i have is if it doesnt workout for me should i be able to flash back to the original bios without a hitch?
 

·
RIP OCN 2018
Joined
·
3,119 Posts
Sub'd. Might try this with my Max VI Gene soon. If anyone does so before me, let me know!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,126 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
<div class="quote-container" data-huddler-embed="/t/1643053/improved-overclocking-for-haswell-with-updated-microcode#post_26474359" data-huddler-embed-placeholder="false"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>SgtRotty</strong> <a href="/t/1643053/improved-overclocking-for-haswell-with-updated-microcode#post_26474359"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif"></a><br><br>
im not afraid to experiment! only question i have is if it doesnt workout for me should i be able to flash back to the original bios without a hitch?</div>
</div>
<br>
Hey <img alt="smile.gif" class="bbcode_smiley" src="http://files.overclock.net/images/smilies/smile.gif"> It is absolutely reversible, just flash with a stock BIOS and any updated modules (including microcode) will be overwritten.<br><br>
I would add though - Back up your BIOS settings, because flashing your BIOS will most likely reset them/delete presets.<br><br>
Happy testing to you and xioros!
 

·
 
Joined
·
29,532 Posts
I also posted in the Haswell Overclocking Guide thread about it, but I'm gonna see how low I can go with VCore for 45x in comparison to before, and then afterwards see how much VCore 46x needs to be stable.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,126 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
<div class="quote-container" data-huddler-embed="/t/1643053/improved-overclocking-for-haswell-with-updated-microcode#post_26474378" data-huddler-embed-placeholder="false"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>gonX</strong> <a href="/t/1643053/improved-overclocking-for-haswell-with-updated-microcode#post_26474378"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif"></a><br><br>
I also posted in the Haswell Overclocking Guide thread about it, but I'm gonna see how low I can go with VCore for 45x in comparison to before, and then afterwards see how much VCore 46x needs to be stable.</div>
</div>
<br>
Good luck you big benevolent-looking dragon person! <img alt="smile.gif" class="bbcode_smiley" src="http://files.overclock.net/images/smilies/smile.gif"><br><br>
It'll be interesting to see whether this improvement is on standard Haswell chips as well as devil's canyon. I really doubt it'd just be devil's canyon, but who knows (they are, after all, so very incredibly different /s). If only they made changelogs for their microcodes!
 

·
 
Joined
·
29,532 Posts
So the results I'm getting so far is that my temperatures are much higher on the new microcode compared to the previous "best overclocking" one - enough of a difference that I am throttling hardcore on Blender.<br>
The CPU wattage numbers reported in HWiNFO64 are about 7-8 watts higher than previously.<br><br>
I'm gonna try resetting the BIOS to see if I accidentally changed some other setting.<br><br>
/edit: BIOS reset and same voltage settings applied - temperatures and wattages are back to "normal" again. <b>False alarm!</b><br><br>
/edit2: it should be noted that I was tinkering with x46 as well, really pushing the voltages. Once I couldn't even get a shade of stability on x46 I went back to x45, but VCore, VRIN, VRing, VSA, VIOA and VIOD were set to the exact same values.
 
  • Rep+
Reactions: SgtRotty

·
 
Joined
·
29,532 Posts
So I think we might be on to something here. I'm now at 0.02v less than before, at a setting that would previously give me a 0x124 BSOD within minutes of x264, but it has now run for almost an hour without crashing.
 
  • Rep+
Reactions: SgtRotty

·
...and you'll FLOAT TOO!!
Joined
·
4,035 Posts
Just flashed my Z87-GD65, so far nothing is on fire, which is always in the plus column.... <img alt="thumb.gif" class="bbcode_smiley" src="http://files.overclock.net/images/smilies/thumb.gif"> I'll have to do some testing to see if I'm reaping any benefit, but the goal should be lower voltages, correct?<br><br>
UPDATE: At this moment, it looks like I was able to reduce my core voltage by about .01v, reducing by .04v resulted in a WHEA BSOD. I'll try to do more testing in the upcoming days though....
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,126 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Okay! So improvements, but maybe not as dramatic as a 0.04v decrease for some. GonX, that sounds like the exact kind of improvement lostparticle and I had! Even if it is 0.02v that’s still less voltage required for free <img alt="smile.gif" class="bbcode_smiley" src="http://files.overclock.net/images/smilies/smile.gif"><br><br>
And blaze2210, I’m glad you’re trying it out! One goal is to run the same clocks at lower voltages, the other is to see if higher clockspeeds are now possible to achieve. I hope you can get more than 0.01v but if that’s the improvement you see it’s the improvement you see. Maybe have a go at getting 100mbz higher with slightly higher/the same voltages you’re running now.<br><br>
EDIT<br><br>
What kind of stress tests are people running? I’d recommend the x264 stress test found under the ‘stressing’ spoiler in Darkwizzie’s thread: <a href="http://www.overclock.net/t/1411077/haswell-overclocking-guide-with-statistics">http://www.overclock.net/t/1411077/haswell-overclocking-guide-with-statistics</a><br><br>
With my 4790k I run it with 16 threads at normal priority. It gets really unstable OCs within minutes, and an overclock stable overnight in that is one hatll be stable in games too. In my experience anyway!
 

·
...and you'll FLOAT TOO!!
Joined
·
4,035 Posts
<div class="quote-container" data-huddler-embed="/t/1643053/improved-overclocking-for-haswell-with-updated-microcode/0_30#post_26475515" data-huddler-embed-placeholder="false"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>d0mini</strong> <a href="/t/1643053/improved-overclocking-for-haswell-with-updated-microcode/0_30#post_26475515"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif"></a><br><br>
Okay! So improvements, but maybe not as dramatic as a 0.04v decrease for some. GonX, that sounds like the exact kind of improvement lostparticle and I had! Even if it is 0.02v that’s still less voltage required for free <img alt="smile.gif" class="bbcode_smiley" src="http://files.overclock.net/images/smilies/smile.gif"><br><br>
And blaze2210, I’m glad you’re trying it out! One goal is to run the same clocks at lower voltages, the other is to see if higher clockspeeds are now possible to achieve. I hope you can get more than 0.01v but if that’s the improvement you see it’s the improvement you see. Maybe have a go at getting 100mbz higher with slightly higher/the same voltages you’re running now.</div>
</div>
<br>
I tried just bumping up the multiplier from 45 to 46 initially - no dice, hit a WHEA BSOD. So I went back to 45x, and dropped the vcore by .04v (as a sort of baseline), loaded into Windows, but crashed when running the x264 portion of RealBench. I'm sure there's probably some more tweaking that can be done with other voltages as well, but those settings are easier to do when my girl isn't home, since my PC is also our Plex server. So basically, my "quick and dirty result" is the .01v reduction, but it's a reduction nonetheless.<br><br>
I'm still trying to get a better grasp on the relationship between the System Agent, IO Analog and Digital voltages, and their impacts on overclocking. I'm pretty sure they could help out with fine-tuning my OC though....
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,126 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
<div class="quote-container" data-huddler-embed="/t/1643053/improved-overclocking-for-haswell-with-updated-microcode/10#post_26475529" data-huddler-embed-placeholder="false"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>blaze2210</strong> <a href="/t/1643053/improved-overclocking-for-haswell-with-updated-microcode/10#post_26475529"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif"></a><br><br>
I tried just bumping up the multiplier from 45 to 46 initially - no dice, hit a WHEA BSOD. So I went back to 45x, and dropped the vcore by .04v (as a sort of baseline), loaded into Windows, but crashed when running the x264 portion of RealBench. I'm sure there's probably some more tweaking that can be done with other voltages as well, but those settings are easier to do when my girl isn't home, since my PC is also our Plex server. So basically, my "quick and dirty result" is the .01v reduction, but it's a reduction nonetheless.<br><br>
I'm still trying to get a better grasp on the relationship between the System Agent, IO Analog and Digital voltages, and their impacts on overclocking. I'm pretty sure they could help out with fine-tuning my OC though....</div>
</div>
<br>
Just to be thorough: what voltage did you need for 4.5GHz, and what stress testing did you do to ensure stability?<br><br>
Without any knowledge of how you stressed/your normal use-cases, it's possible your overclock was on the edge of stability with the settings you had. That would mean the microcode is giving greater stability than before, and would explain the smaller voltage saved when compared with those starting with more stable overclocks.<br><br>
I'm not trying to knock your testing, just ensure this is solid data. I'm pretty certain your response will be that you've tested the balls out of this CPU and it's as solid as a rock, and if so then never mind <img alt="biggrin.gif" class="bbcode_smiley" src="http://files.overclock.net/images/smilies/biggrin.gif"><br><br><br>
If you're still within safe voltages and temperatures, you could always try adding some voltage to get 4.6GHz stable, maybe you'll be able to do it within safe limits now.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,126 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Looks like we've got another positive outcome from <a class="bbcode_url" href="https://as.reddit.com/r/overclocking/comments/7gknrh/still_on_haswell_try_updating_your_microcode/" target="_blank">user ppp2211 on reddit</a>! He states he's not getting the 0.04v improvement I saw, but is still managing to get 4.9GHz stable where before he could only get 4.8. <img alt="smile.gif" class="bbcode_smiley" src="http://files.overclock.net/images/smilies/smile.gif"><br><br>
EDIT<br><br>
I also realised that the differing voltage improvements may be linked to the microcode your BIOS had originally, as well as being unique to different CPUs. What microcode versions did you all come from? You could find out by reading an unmodded BIOS file with UBU.
 

·
...and you'll FLOAT TOO!!
Joined
·
4,035 Posts
<div class="quote-container" data-huddler-embed="/t/1643053/improved-overclocking-for-haswell-with-updated-microcode/0_30#post_26475610" data-huddler-embed-placeholder="false"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>d0mini</strong> <a href="/t/1643053/improved-overclocking-for-haswell-with-updated-microcode/0_30#post_26475610"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif"></a><br><br>
Just to be thorough: what voltage did you need for 4.5GHz, and what stress testing did you do to ensure stability?<br><br>
Without any knowledge of how you stressed/your normal use-cases, it's possible your overclock was on the edge of stability with the settings you had. That would mean the microcode is giving greater stability than before, and would explain the smaller voltage saved when compared with those starting with more stable overclocks.<br><br>
I'm not trying to knock your testing, just ensure this is solid data. I'm pretty certain your response will be that you've tested the balls out of this CPU and it's as solid as a rock, and if so then never mind <img alt="biggrin.gif" class="bbcode_smiley" src="http://files.overclock.net/images/smilies/biggrin.gif"><br><br><br>
If you're still within safe voltages and temperatures, you could always try adding some voltage to get 4.6GHz stable, maybe you'll be able to do it within safe limits now.</div>
</div>
<br>
For 4.5, my 4670K needs ~1.328v for stability (1.318v after changing microcode)- passed 10 x264 runs in RealBench, 20 runs in IBT v2.54 on Standard and High settings, plus the assorted games and benches that have been thrown at it over the course of the last few months since I went back to my 4.5 profile. When it's warmer outside, I drop down to a 4.2 profile to keep the temps a bit lower. I'm definitely going to see if I can get 4.6 stable, but I have to aim for points when Plex isn't being used.<br><br>
Previously, my BIOS was on the 19 microcode, then updated to 22. <img alt="thumb.gif" class="bbcode_smiley" src="http://files.overclock.net/images/smilies/thumb.gif"><br><br><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/3161061/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="3161061" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/3161061/width/350/height/700/flags/LL" style="; width: 350px; height: 183px"></a>
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,126 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
That's a decent amount of testing, I'm happy that you're at least able to run it with a little less voltage!<br><br>
Thanks for the info, that pretty solidly eliminates the idea I had that coming from microcode 19 to 22 might be different than coming from an earlier/later microcode. You and I both came from 19 to 22 and had very different results, it must be CPU dependant.
 

·
 
Joined
·
29,532 Posts
I was using the "best for overclocking" suggested in UBU, I believe it's 0x19. Whatever the number is, it's the one that was suggested as "best for overclocking" <img alt="tongue.gif" class="bbcode_smiley" src="http://files.overclock.net/images/smilies/tongue.gif"><br><br>
The settings I mentioned earlier were not stable - crashed after 90 minutes of x264.<br><br>
So let me sum up my current status of OC:<br><br>
My CPU VID is 1.165v.<br>
I use offset (which automatically means 0.07v higher voltage in Blender, but not in my x264 even though it's using AVX/AVX2, read below)<br>
I use auto uncore multiplier.<br>
I have all C-states enabled.<br>
I don't test with Prime or other synthetics.<br><br>
So for my x45 OC on the old 0x19 microcode, that did 6 hours in x264 before a WHEA BSOD, but never crashed while gaming, I would use:
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">- VCore: +0.145v<br>
- VRIN: 2.05v<br>
- VRing: +0.155v (1.205v)<br>
- VSysAg: +0.15v<br>
- V IO A: +0.1v<br>
- V IO D: +0.1v</div>
</div>
So it's important to note that my previous OC was not "acceptably" stable by normal means (8 hours x264, I only had 6).<br><br>
Meanwhile, my current settings for x45 with the latest microcode (0x22) which aren't confirmed stable yet (still running x264):
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">- VCore: +0.125v<br>
- VRIN: 1.9v<br>
- VRing: +0.155v (1.205v)<br>
- VSysAg: +0.15v<br>
- V IO A: +0.1v<br>
- V IO D: +0.1v</div>
</div>
I would like to point out I got a WHEA BSOD after 90 minutes with 1.95v VRIN, so I'm testing 1.9v VRIN now.<br>
/edit: also, this VCore would crash in minutes on the old microcode as I mentioned above<br><br>
As for the bench, I rolled my own x264 bench, using a x264 version that uses AVX2, since I encode videos regularly and want the system to be stable under AVX/AVX2 as well.<br>
My command line is:
<div class="bbcode_code">
<div class="bbcode_code_head">Code:</div>
<pre>
<code>x264.2744kMod.x86_64.exe --bitrate 15000 --threads 12 --preset slower beees.mp4 -o NUL</code>
</pre></div>
beees.mp4 is found here: <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cx6eaVeYXOs" target="_blank">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cx6eaVeYXOs</a> - there is a download link in the description
 
  • Rep+
Reactions: d0mini

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,126 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Thanks for the in-depth testing <a data-huddler-embed="href" href="/u/23199/gonX">@gonX</a> <img alt="smile.gif" class="bbcode_smiley" src="http://files.overclock.net/images/smilies/smile.gif"> It seems that on average people are seeing an improvement of 0.02v as you are experiencing yourself, if that overclock has proven to be stable.<br><br>
I'm a little amazed at how many people are still rocking their Haswell builds and actively looking to improve them, particularly on r/overclocking! I'm really happy I was able to share this with you all so you can enjoy the very same nerdy happiness by improving your overclock as I had. <img alt="smile.gif" class="bbcode_smiley" src="http://files.overclock.net/images/smilies/smile.gif">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
353 Posts
SUB'd
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,321 Posts
Interesting, I wonder if I can apply this to my Alienware 17 with a 4930mx<br><br>
I should probably fix the heatsink first though.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,126 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Great to have you both for the ride <img alt="smile.gif" class="bbcode_smiley" src="http://files.overclock.net/images/smilies/smile.gif"><br><br>
I hope you get around to trying it out Receiver! I think the main issue would arise with flashing the modified BIOS, you’ll probably have to use the tool/guide from this thread to do it: <a href="https://www.win-raid.com/t286f16-Guide-Flashing-modified-AMI-Aptio-UEFI-using-AFU.html#msg3571" target="_blank">https://www.win-raid.com/t286f16-Guide-Flashing-modified-AMI-Aptio-UEFI-using-AFU.html#msg3571</a><br><br>
Good luck to you, and to you as well Shweller!
 
1 - 20 of 286 Posts
Top