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Discussion Starter #1
Let me preface this by saying that if I am missing something really obvious then sorry for wasting your time and feel free to make me look like the fool I am.


Alright here is something I've been curious about that I am sure somebody out here has a very good answer for and maybe some of you have the same question. I have always used air cooling for my setups and I am thoroughly impressed with some of the stuff out there, however water cooling not only works great but looks awesome in the process. I think it'd be cool to have simply for the sake of having the option to run with a higher vcore through my venice. Alright so what the heck do I want to know already right?

Why is it that the general vcore limitations are higher for water cooling than air cooling? I mean in theory if I have a cpu cooler that can match a water setup in terms of the load temps then why the max vcore difference? I get the idea that if I have water I am ok to take my vcore to 1.65 (or whatever your personal opinion is) but trying that on air is a big no no. If you know where I am coming from and have an explanation, i'd love to hear it. Thanks ahead of time everybody.
 

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I believe its because many assume water cooling is better than air so as a result it allows people to use higher vcore. This is very generalised as there are many good air coolers on the market that are fairly close to the power of a water cooling setup.

Dont worry too much about vcore (1.65v max imo) as long as your temps are below 50C

I ran my 3200+ venice and so does Fusion @ 1.65v and its fine (on air).
 

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water has an incredibly high heat capacity compared to air. Also, the heat transfer from the cpu to the air is rather inefficient compared to direct heat transfer to water. If you had amazing air cooling, why couldn't you use the same vcore that water would allow? It's all about temperatures, if they're the same with both setups, then it should work. Otherwise, the only reason you can use a greater vcore with water is because the water system will draw the heat away faster than air cooling can.
 

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meh. I don't buy their crap. If it's under 50, and it's stable...I will do it...as long as it's not crazy vcore.

Go for 1.65v if you really want...just keep the temps in check. That's just some people making up stuff to sound informative.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
So it's ALL about temps, no matter how it's cooled, so long as it is cool then vcore settings can potentially be the same?
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by Mr. Jules
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So it's ALL about temps, no matter how it's cooled, so long as it is cool then vcore settings can potentially be the same?

exactly.
 

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Just so you know... heat does NOT kill CPUs. Electomigration does. The more voltage you pump through the faster the connections wear out. If it is hot, the connections wear out even faster.
 

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DuckieHo is correct. Heat itself is not the culprit (well, not until things start melting). Heat weakens components, making it easier for electrons to jump to places they are not supposed to be.
 
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