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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok so this is a block I made with a mind to test my skills and see what the limitations would be with using a dremel instead of a mill to cut waterblocks and at the very least I have learned a lot:

The initial sketchup I did on the block was marked for cuts 2mm apart based on the assumption I was cutting grooves about 1mm thick, there's a couple of mistakes on it, but since it was only a test I wasn't too worried:



End result after cutting:



The 2mm spacing on the entrance side with the channels I found was a bit close; where it crossed over it essentially left nothing but a rough surface. I think I would use a 3mm spacing instead next time.

For the pins:



I decided I wasn't really going to be able to do the 2mm spacing and leave anything worthwhile so I left these as 4mm spacing and then widened the channels a little. Again I think this would benefit from having 3mm spacing between the cuts, which is what I plan to use on future projects.

This was all cut in 3mm aluminium from a skanky old thermaltake case I had lying about.

I'll need to get a few more bits before I can actually test this block, a nice thick plastic layer to hold it steady, some rubber cord to seal the edges and a Tap to be able to attach barbs to it...

I'm expecting a very high resistance block, I don't think it would deal with anything beyond water in it.

Anyway, tell me what you think for a first crude effort.
 

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Well I applaud you for that result using a dremel.........it's impressive. I have a well use dremel myself so I know the limitations.
I know of someone who made a block in 10mm copper plate using a high power hand held router....Personally I wouldn't do that either !!!!

I understand it is just a tester but as a block there are a few problems..... the groove for the rubber cord wont be deep enough...not with the rubber cords I have seen/used, the gap between this plate and the other will mean the water used as coolant for the most part wont even look your grooves - they will have neglible effect.
Then I am not sure about the grooves themselves.....
Finally, I doubt very much indeed, that you get a good fixing for the nozzles in just 3mm of thread. In copper you need a minimum of 6-7mm for a secure fix, less than this and once you have fitted and unscrewed them a few times it goes loose.
The main problem is 3mm aluminium is hardly block material.
 

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Try using the thin cut wheel, it's 1mm from memory so they channels will be nice and thin
smile.gif


You'll have to make yourself some type of jig though, to keep everything nice and straight and even depth
wink.gif
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by zipdogso;13277484
Well I applaud you for that result using a dremel.........it's impressive. I have a well use dremel myself so I know the limitations.
I know of someone who made a block in 10mm copper plate using a high power hand held router....Personally I wouldn't do that either !!!!

I understand it is just a tester but as a block there are a few problems..... the groove for the rubber cord wont be deep enough...not with the rubber cords I have seen/used, the gap between this plate and the other will mean the water used as coolant for the most part wont even look your grooves - they will have neglible effect.
Then I am not sure about the grooves themselves.....
Finally, I doubt very much indeed, that you get a good fixing for the nozzles in just 3mm of thread. In copper you need a minimum of 6-7mm for a secure fix, less than this and once you have fitted and unscrewed them a few times it goes loose.
The main problem is 3mm aluminium is hardly block material.
I have already deepened the grooves, but you're right, I'm going to order several different types of rubber cord to test, it's very cheap after all.

As for fixing barbs into the 3mm aluminium, that's not a concern at all, I'm going to use an acrylic or similar for the back. Much easier to thread and work with, also I can have it thick enough to support the bottom plate, it might for future blocks pay to put the groove for the rubber in that part instead of the actual block.
 
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