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Core i - Second generation

Dual Core CPUs:
  • LGA 1155
    i3 2100T (2.50GHz, 3MB L3, 650/1100MHz GPU, HT)
    i3 2100 (3.10GHz, 3MB L3, 850/1100MHz GPU, HT)
    i3 2120 (3.30GHz, 3MB L3, 850/1100MHz GPU, HT)
    i5 2390T (2.70GHz, 3MB L3, 650/1100MHz GPU, HT, Turbo - 3.50GHz)
Quad Core CPUs:
  • LGA 1155
    i5 2300 (2.80GHz, 6MB L3, 850/1100MHz GPU, Turbo - 3.10GHz)
    i5 2400S (2.50GHz, 6MB L3, 850/1100MHz GPU, Turbo - 3.30GHz)
    i5 2400 (3.10GHz, 6MB L3, 850/1100MHz GPU, Turbo - 3.40GHz)
    i5 2500T (2.30GHz, 6MB L3, 650/1250MHz GPU, Turbo - 3.30GHz)
    i5 2500S (2.70GHz, 6MB L3, 850/1100MHz GPU, Turbo - 3.70GHz)
    i5 2500 (3.30GHz, 6MB L3, 850/1100MHz GPU, Turbo - 3.70GHz)
    i5 2500K (3.30GHz, 6MB L3, 850/1100MHz GPU, Turbo - 3.70GHz, Unlocked)
    i7 2600S (2.80GHz, 8MB L3, 850/1100MHz GPU, HT, Turbo - 3.80GHz)
    i7 2600 (3.40GHz, 8MB L3, 850/1350MHz GPU, HT, Turbo - 3.80GHz)
    i7 2600K (3.40GHz, 8MB L3, 850/1350MHz GPU, HT, Turbo - 3.80GHz, Unlocked)
Core i - First generation

Dual Core CPUs:
  • LGA 1156
    i3 530 (2.93GHz, 4MB L3, 22x, 733MHz GPU, HT)
    i3 540 (3.06GHz, 4MB L3, 23x, 733MHz GPU, HT)
    i3 550 (3.20GHz, 4MB L3, 24x, 733MHz GPU, HT)
    i3 560 (3.33GHz, 4MB L3, 25x, 733MHz GPU, HT)
    i5 650 (3.20GHz, 4MB L3, 24x, 733MHz GPU, HT, Turbo)
    i5 655K (3.20GHz, 4MB L3, Unlocked, 733MHz GPU, HT, Turbo)
    i5 660 (3.33GHz, 4MB L3, 25x, 733MHz GPU, HT, Turbo)
    i5 661 (3.33GHz, 4MB L3, 25x, 900MHz GPU, HT, Turbo)
    i5 670 (3.46GHz, 4MB L3, 26x, 733MHz GPU, HT, Turbo)
    i5 680 (3.60GHz, 4MB L3, 27x, 733MHz GPU, HT, Turbo)
Quad Core CPUs:
  • LGA 1156
    i5 750S (2.40GHz, 8MB L3, 18x, Turbo)
    i5 750 (2.66GHz, 8MB L3, 20x, Turbo)
    i5 760 (2.80GHz, 8MB L3, 21x, Turbo)
    i7 860S (2.53GHz, 8MB L3, 19x, HT, Turbo)
    i7 860 (2.80GHz, 8MB L3, 21x, HT, Turbo)
    i7 870S (2.67GHz, 8MB L3, 20x, HT, Turbo)
    i7 870 (2.93GHz, 8MB L3, 22x, HT, Turbo)
    i7 875K (2.93GHz, 8MB L3, Unlocked, HT, Turbo)
    i7 880 (3.07GHz, 8MB L3, 23x, HT, Turbo)
  • LGA 1366
    i7 920 (2.66GHz, 8MB L3, 20x, HT, Turbo)
    i7 930 (2.80GHz, 8MB L3, 21x, HT, Turbo)
    i7 940 (2.93GHz, 8MB L3, 22x, HT, Turbo)
    i7 950 (3.06GHz, 8MB L3, 23x, HT, Turbo)
    i7 960 (3.20GHz, 8MB L3, 24x, HT, Turbo)
    i7 965 (3.20GHz, 8MB L3, Unlocked, HT, Extreme Edition)
    i7 975 (3.33GHz, 8MB L3, Unlocked, HT, Extreme Edition)
Hex Core CPUs:
  • LGA 1366
    i7 970 (3.33GHz, 12MB L3, 25x, HT, Turbo)
    i7 980X (3.06GHz, 12MB L3, Unlocked, HT, Extreme Edition)
    i7 990X (3.46GHz, 12MB L3, Unlocked, HT, Extreme Edition)
Core 2
LGA 775, by multiplier (Extreme Editions by process), including Pentium Dual Core and Celeron

Dual Core CPUs:
  • 7x
    E6300 (2MB L2, 1.86GHz, 1066 FSB)
    X3040 (2MB L2, 1.86GHz, 1066 FSB)
    E6320 (4MB L2, 1.86GHz, 1066 FSB)
    E6550 (4MB L2, 2.33GHz, 1333 FSB)
    X3065 (4MB L2, 2.33GHz, 1333 FSB)
  • 8x
    E1200 (512KB L2, 1.60GHz, 800 FSB)
    E2140 (1MB L2, 1.60GHz, 800 FSB)
    E6400 (2MB L2, 2.13GHz, 1066 FSB)
    X3050 (2MB L2, 2.13GHz, 1066 FSB)
    E6420 (4MB L2, 2.13GHz, 1066 FSB)
    E6750 (4MB L2, 2.66GHz, 1333 FSB)
    X3075 (4MB L2, 2.66GHz, 1333 FSB)
    E8200 (6MB L2, 2.66GHz, 1333 FSB)
  • 8.5x
    E8300 (6MB L2, 2.83GHz, 1333 FSB)
  • 9x
    E2160 (1MB L2, 1.80GHz, 800 FSB)
    E4300 (2MB L2, 1.80GHz, 800 FSB)
    E6600 (4MB L2, 2.40GHz, 1066 FSB)
    X3060 (4MB L2, 2.40GHz, 1066 FSB)
    E6850 (4MB L2, 3.00GHz, 1333 FSB)
    X3085 (4MB L2, 3.00GHz, 1333 FSB)
    E8400 (6MB L2, 3.00GHz, 1333 FSB)
    E3110 (6MB L2, 3.00GHz, 1333 FSB)
  • 9.5x
    E7200 (3MB L2, 2.53GHz, 1066 FSB)
    E8500 (6MB L2, 3.16GHz, 1333 FSB)
  • 10x
    E1400 (512KB L2, 2.00GHz, 800 FSB)
    E2180 (1MB L2, 2.00GHz, 800 FSB)
    E4400 (2MB L2, 2.00GHz, 800 FSB)
    E6700 (4MB L2, 2.66GHz, 1066 FSB)
    X3070 (4MB L2, 2.66GHz, 1066 FSB)
    E7300 (3MB L2, 2.66GHz, 1066 FSB)
    E8600 (6MB L2, 3.33GHz, 1333 FSB)
  • 10.5
    E7400 (3MB L2, 2.80GHz, 1066 FSB)
  • 11x
    E2200 (1MB L2, 2.20GHz, 800 FSB)
    E4500 (2MB L2, 2.20GHz, 800 FSB)
    E7500 (3MB L2, 2.93GHz, 1066 FSB)
  • 12x
    E4600 (2MB L2, 2.40GHz, 800 FSB)
  • 12.5x
    E5200 (2MB L2, 2.50GHz, 800 FSB)
  • 13x
    E4700 (2MB L2, 2.60GHz, 800 FSB)
    E5300 (2MB L2, 2.60GHz, 800 FSB)
  • 13.5
    E5400 (2MB L2, 2.70GHz, 800 FSB)
Quad Core CPUs:
  • 7x
    Q8200 (4MB L2, 2.33GHz, 1333 FSB)
    Q9250 (12MB L2, 2.33GHz, 1333 FSB)
  • 7.5x
    Q8300 (4MB L2, 2.53GHz, 1333 FSB)
    Q9300 (6MB L2, 2.53GHz, 1333 FSB)
  • 8x
    X3210 (8MB L2, 2.13GHz, 1066 FSB)
    Q9400 (6MB L2, 2.66GHz, 1333 FSB)
    X3330 (6MB L2, 2.66GHz, 1333 FSB)
    Q9450 (12MB L2, 2.66GHz, 1333 FSB)
    X3350 (12MB L2, 2.66GHz, 1333 FSB)
  • 8.5x
    Q9550 (12MB L2, 2.83GHz, 1333 FSB)
    X3360 (12MB L2, 2.83GHz, 1333 FSB)
  • 9x
    Q6600 (8MB L2, 2.40GHz, 1066 FSB)
    X3220 (8MB L2, 2.40GHz, 1066 FSB)
    Q9650 (12MB L2, 3.00GHz, 1333 FSB)
    X3370 (12MB L2, 3.00GHz, 1333 FSB)
  • 10x
    Q6700 (8MB L2, 2.66GHz, 1066 FSB)
    X3230 (8MB L2, 2.66GHz, 1066 FSB)
Extreme (Quad unless stated otherwise):
  • 65nm
    X6800 (4MB L2, 2.93GHz, 1066 FSB) - Dual Core
    QX6700 (8MB L2, 2.66GHz, 1066 FSB)
    QX6800 (8MB L2, 2.93GHz, 1066 FSB)
    QX6850 (8MB L2, 3.00GHz, 1333 FSB)
  • 45nm
    QX9650 (12MB L2, 3.00GHz, 1333 FSB)
    QX9770 (12MB L2, 3.20GHz, 1600 FSB)
 

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cool I will use this some how
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by NuclearCrap View Post
NuclearCrap: can anybody just reply to the thread instead of viewing and leaving lol
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by NuclearCrap View Post
Intel has been bumping FSB of chips for none other reason than marketing. Fact is, while they're faster at stock, they don't top out as well as the predecessors. Why? I've compiled this list to show you what the non-Extreme CPUs really are, by multipliers.
Fact is, not everyone overclocks. They are bumping the FSB because it increases stock performance for those uncomfortable overclocking. Multipliers aren't everything, the Q6600 is only made by putting two E6600s together, not by putting two E6850s together.
 

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Dont forget the Pentium Dual core series, they are just Core2 with less cache
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Quote:

Originally Posted by crazypip666 View Post
Fact is, not everyone overclocks. They are bumping the FSB because it increases stock performance for those uncomfortable overclocking. Multipliers aren't everything, the Q6600 is only made by putting two E6600s together, not by putting two E6850s together.
Q6600 actually is 2x E6850's if you think about it. E6600 and E6850 are the same chips, only the latter was given the G0 revision. To sum that up, early B3 Q6600's are made from 2x E6600's while the G0 ones are from 2x E6850's, but in essence they're just the same chip with a different core revision, a.k.a marketing strategy that allows them to once again sell the E6600 as E6850 for the same price.

Even if the user doesn't overclock, you cannot deny that they aren't the same chips on different core revisions. What makes you think I don't know it is to increase stock performance? All I'm saying is that by doing so, they can resell the same thing for more money. I even mentioned it here:

Quote:
Intel has been bumping FSB of chips for none other reason than marketing. Fact is, while they're faster at stock, they don't top out as well as the predecessors.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Quote:

Originally Posted by Mootsfox View Post
First list of this kind. Nice work.
Thanks. I thought I'd make it so people can refer to it when buying a new CPU. Overclocking is heavily dependent on max FSB and multiplier anyway but Intel is tricking people into buying overpriced chips with low multipliers.
 

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are you sure E6850's are used in Q6600's where did you get that info

Cause if that is true why isn't every Q6600 user getting at least 3.6Ghz?

quite a few E6850 reach 4.0Ghz but quad cores rarely real that speed.
 

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Damn Nuke, Must have taken sometime to type all of that. Good info as well. +1

Looks like your good with your hands after all...
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Quote:

Originally Posted by kazakia View Post
are you sure E6850's are used in Q6600's where did you get that info

Cause if that is true why isn't every Q6600 user getting at least 3.6Ghz?

quite a few E6850 reach 4.0Ghz but quad cores rarely real that speed.
E6850 isn't really a E6850 you know. When Intel made the G0 revision they didn't bother calling it a E6600 again so they bumped the stock FSB and price and called it a E6850. On the quad side, they left the 6800/6850 name for the Extreme, so they simply refreshed the Q6600s with the G0 revision. What is the difference other than the stock speed? They're both G0 and they both have 9x multiplier.

Also, dual core CPUs always overclock a bit higher than their quad core cousins by nature. Lots of people have hit 3.8GHz on the Q6600 G0. I got my info from my experience with multiple Core 2 CPUs and analyzing the info given at www.intel.com for each chip. To find the multiplier, all you have to do is to divide the stock speed (in MHz) by 1/4 of the stock FSB (in MHz). When they say 1333MHz it's really 1333.3333333......MHz, so is 1066.666666......MHz, so take that into consideration.

E6850 = 3000MHz/(1333MHz/4) = 3000MHz/333MHz = 9x multiplier
 

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So I have a serious hangover here from a meeting/dinner with verizon wireless for work.

But am I understanding this correctly? The lower the multiplier, the easier/higher it will overclock? (not higher as in total Mhz/Ghz,) but percentage wise? Thats what it seems like he's saying... Is this true? Someone correct me please.

~R
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Quote:

Originally Posted by relic2279 View Post
So I have a serious hangover here from a meeting/dinner with verizon wireless for work.

But am I understanding this correctly? The lower the multiplier, the easier/higher it will overclock? (not higher as in total Mhz/Ghz,) but percentage wise? Thats what it seems like he's saying... Is this true? Someone correct me please.

~R
The higher the multiplier, the easier it is to overclock. Percentage-wise, the lower multiplier would gain more percentage because it requires more. But I'd much rather have a 3.5GHz E6600 with more headroom than a 3.5GHz E6550 that's been pushed to the max at 500x7.


From my experience with the ten thousand and one Core 2 CPUs I've dealt with, 9x multiplier is the sweet spot. 8x is a just a bit too little and 10x is excessive, although 10x would shine in weaker motherboards (like on a mATX build or something of that sort). Don't even mess with 7x unless you feel like wasting money for fun.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by NuclearCrap View Post
The higher the multiplier, the easier it is to overclock. Percentage-wise, the lower multiplier would gain more percentage because it requires more. But I'd much rather have a 3.5GHz E6600 with more headroom than a 3.5GHz E6550 that's been pushed to the max at 500x7.


From my experience with the ten thousand and one Core 2 CPUs I've dealt with, 9x multiplier is the sweet spot. 8x is a just a bit too little and 10x is excessive, although 10x would shine in weaker motherboards (like on a mATX build or something of that sort). Don't even mess with 7x unless you feel like wasting money for fun.

lol...I wish I had realized that when I got my e6320 (7x multi
). It still oc's well, but even 1x more would make me sooo happy
 
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