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Retired Benchmark Editor
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Discussion Starter #1
Seen a lot of confusion about maximum voltages for Intel processors. Most seem to think that the VID is the max. NO, the VID range is only the range in which you will factory ships CPUs.

Example. The max voltage for an e8400 is 1.45v not the 1.36v, which is only the highest VID they will ship a CPU.

I only polled the most recent chip. If you would like some of the older 65nm chips specs posted let me know and I will add them. If you need any of the tables that are noted but not posted, send me a PM.

EDIT:
All chips are NOT created equal!
All written limitations should be taken with a grain of salt. Some chips might be able to handle these limitations and some might fall short. As most know, each chip will not OC or handle voltage the same. What I take from the below specs is that Intel used components on their chips that are rated to handle the specs listed. Though, not all components live up to their rated maximums. Intel is just stating that the risk of damaging will increase the closer you get to these limitations and going over these specs will almost guaranty a degrading chip. How close you decide to get to these points is up to the overclocker. I know there are many here who like to push the limits on their chips for 24/7 usage and this info is for them. The rest who wish to keep their chips alive for many years of use would probably be better sticking to VID as your limitation.

Source: http://www.intel.com/design/

Core i7 vcore max 1.55v 67.9c





QX9775 max vcore 1.35v 63c




QX9000, Q9000 and Q8000 vcore max 1.45v 71.4c or 76.3c






e7000 and e8000 max vcore 1.45v e8000 72.4c e7000 74.1c





e5000 max vcore 1.45v 74.1c




QX6000 and Q6000Max vcore 1.55v





QX6xx0 Temps

Q6600 B3 Stepping Temps

Q6600 and Q6700 G0 Stepping Temps


If you notice any mistakes please let me know.

If you feel like sharing this info, copy this in your sig:

Code:

Code:
[CODE]
:aaskull:[url="http://www.overclock.net/intel-cpus/472058-intel-cpu-s-maximum-voltages-temps.html"]Intel Max Volts and Temps![/url]:aaskull:
[/CODE]

More great data concerning Intel voltage and temps and can found in ChickenInferno's thread:
http://www.overclock.net/intel-cpus/...-voltages.html
 

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Why not compile data into easy to reference spreadsheet instead of screenshots of PDFs?
 
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I thought the same at first untill I read the description of "absolute max". Intel clearly states stability/average lifetime can not be expected. If 1.45v is really the max then why does Intel stop assigning VIDs at 1.3625v (and probably recycle/discard those that fail to run properly within the VID range)?

From what I understand..

1.25v max (box sticker): Scare off overclockers
1.3625v max VID: Max vcore without shortening life span (at all?)
1.45v max: "Sigh after sigh after sigh if you really insist" type of thing, then don't exceed this voltage, but lifespan is highly questionable.
 

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Retired Benchmark Editor
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Discussion Starter #5
Quote:

Originally Posted by DuckieHo View Post
Why not compile data into easy to reference spreadsheet instead of screenshots of PDFs?

Becuase there is a lot of other data here like Vcc voltage limitations that might also help those who don't know how much FSB/VTT voltage is to much.
 

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How sure is this? I don't want to sound like a noob, but will my I7 last at 1.55v? If I was able to pump that much volts through it I could probably get 4.6 ghz stable with a better radiator.
 

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Q6600?
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by PizzaMan View Post
Becuase there is a lot of other data here like Vcc voltage limitations that might also help those who don't know how much FSB/VTT voltage is to much.
It just might be too much information if someone is not familar how to read spec sheets.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Quote:


Originally Posted by derelict360
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Q6600?

Yea, the q6600 is a very popular chip. I'll add it later.

Quote:


Originally Posted by bulmung
View Post

How sure is this? I don't want to sound like a noob, but will my I7 last at 1.55v? If I was able to pump that much volts through it I could probably get 4.6 ghz stable with a better radiator.

If you can keep temps below 67.9c. Those i7'a are some hot chips. You'll most likely reach temp limit first.
 

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im really curious on the q6600 as well
 

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Iconoclast
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There are a few main problems I see with a list like this:

1. The voltages listed are the absolute max limits, intended to be survivable for very short periods of time only. Running at these voltages all the time is almost guaranteed to cut the life of a CPU dramatically, unless you can keep the chip very cold.

Without subambient cooling, 1.55v is not even close to a 24/7 viable voltage for an i7.

The VID range is a better guidline for most. Also, VID assumes that voffset and vdroop are going to be present at intel specs, remove them and the voltage spikes are going to greatly exceed the VID you set.

2. The temperatures listed are TCASE (the temperature of the center top of the IHS), and TCASE has nothing to do with the temperatures read by any DTS monitoring program. TCASE max is a much lower number than tjmax.

3. Relating to the above two, these lists are taken out of context. Without a good understanding of all the terms used and the implications of each, these number are very misleading.
 

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Q(X)6xxx, OP has permission to use my screenshot.

 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by DuckieHo View Post
It just might be too much information if someone is not familar how to read spec sheets.
That, and there are references to tables and figures that are not included.
 

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Retired Benchmark Editor
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Discussion Starter #16
Updated thread with all the QX6000 and Q6000 series info as requested.

Also added this note to OP:

Quote:


All chips are NOT created equal!
All written limitations should be taken with a grain of salt. Some chips might be able to handle these limitations and some might fall short. As most know, each chip will not OC or handle voltage the same. What I take from the below specs is that Intel used components on their chips that are rated to handle the specs listed. Though, not all components live up to their rated maximums. Intel is just stating that the risk of damaging will increase the closer you get to these limitations and going over these specs will almost guaranty a degrading chip. How close you decide to get to these points is up to the overclocker. I know there are many here who like to push the limits on their chips for 24/7 usage and this info is for them. The rest who wish to keep their chips alive for many years of use would probably be better sticking to VID as your limitation.

 

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Discussion Starter #18
Quote:


Originally Posted by ericeod
View Post

I do not see a source link anywhere in the thread. It needs to be included, and I recommend adding the warnings about the "Absolute Maximum Voltages".


Added source link: http://www.intel.com/design/

My previous note should cover warnings about getting close to absolute maximums.
 

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OG OC
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This has been posted about numerous times on OCN. Intel deliberately is enigmatic about limits so they don't get sued. Anything between the max VID and the absolute max is going to degrade your processor, it says it right in the source. Meaning, with a Q9550, over 1.3625 and under 1.45 will degrade life expectancy. Over 1.45 and you'll be lucky if it ever works again.

Quote:


Originally Posted by DeadSkull
View Post

How much would 1.4Vcore degrade the lifetime of my Q9650?

There's no way to tell. There are too many variables involved, including what temperature the processor would run with that voltage. The higher the temps, the lower the longevity; but anything over the VID max of 1.3625 WILL reduce the life of the processor.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by zooterboy View Post
T Over 1.45 and you'll be lucky if it ever works again.
LOL! I've put 1.65V through my E8500 for benching and I just primed it for 10.5 hours the other day 4.5ghz 1.360V stable. Degraded? I think not.

Just use common sense people, I've ran around 1.41-1.42V on my CPU 24/7 for quite awhile now with no issues. Now that I've found the "sweet spot" in terms of voltage I'll probably just stay at 4.5ghz 1.36V since it requires so much more (1.42v) for just a 200mhz gain to 4.7ghz
 
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