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Locked SKUs and Skylake Xeon E3 are coming out on Sept.3rd-ish.

If you purchase or acquire one, please make sure to post your BCLK OC here.

Keep in mind that the Xeon E3 is cheaper than desktop i5 and i7, and probably binned better.

The Xeon E3 1230v5 will be identical to the i7 6700 and cost the same as an i5 6600K, so be sure to check that out (on Sept.3rd) and tell us how it overclocks.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLAWNOOB View Post

Locked SKUs and Skylake Xeon E3 are coming out on Sept.3rd-ish.

If you purchase or acquire one, please make sure to post your BCLK OC here.

Keep in mind that the Xeon E3 is cheaper than desktop i5 and i7, and probably binned better.

The Xeon E3 1230v5 will be identical to the i7 6700 and cost the same as an i5 6600K, so be sure to check that out (on Sept.3rd) and tell us how it overclocks.
I asked this very question when I was at IDF. The answer I received is that locked SKUs still have the BCLK tied to the internal PCI-E clock and only unlocked SKUs have the granularity feature.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by lutjens View Post

I asked this very question when I was at IDF. The answer I received is that locked SKUs still have the BCLK tied to the internal PCI-E clock and only unlocked SKUs have the granularity feature.
If so then all my hope for skylake is gone, it is meaningless to me if they do that, bringing back bclk overclocking was the best decision they made in recent years, but if it's only available for k sku's then it's just kind of cool, but ultimately meh
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Quote:
Originally Posted by lutjens View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLAWNOOB View Post

Locked SKUs and Skylake Xeon E3 are coming out on Sept.3rd-ish.

If you purchase or acquire one, please make sure to post your BCLK OC here.

Keep in mind that the Xeon E3 is cheaper than desktop i5 and i7, and probably binned better.

The Xeon E3 1230v5 will be identical to the i7 6700 and cost the same as an i5 6600K, so be sure to check that out (on Sept.3rd) and tell us how it overclocks.
I asked this very question when I was at IDF. The answer I received is that locked SKUs still have the BCLK tied to the internal PCI-E clock and only unlocked SKUs have the granularity feature.
Doesn't it cost them more money to locked down the BCLK with some CPUs and unlock them on others?

Who did you ask?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLAWNOOB View Post

Doesn't it cost them more money to locked down the BCLK with some CPUs and unlock them on others?

Who did you ask?
Don't think it would cost more...all it would take is a snip to disable the onboard PCI-E clock generator in some chips and leave it active in others. The only added expense is for motherboard makers who have to include a clock generator for K SKUs. The person I asked works for Intel in their performance group. I don't want to mention names, but he'd definitely know...
wink.gif
 

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Amongst the Xeon CPUs, it is increasingly looking like only the E5 1600 series is unlocked.

We'll have to wait for the HEDT Skylake to come out and even then, it will not be server parts, but failed Xeons (which is basically what the HEDTs are).

So basically if you want an unlocked Skylake Xeon, you'll want E5 16XX v5 (v3 being Haswell, v4 Broadwell)? We will not see that until Skylake E I fear.

For the consumer CPUs:

Anyways, if anyone is interested, this is a list of in stock in Canada:
http://www.nowinstock.net/ca/computers/processors/intel/

Nothing in stock in Canada as of 8/30/2015. Only preorders.
mad.gif


For the US:
http://www.nowinstock.net/computers/processors/intel/

6600K available, 6700K hard to come by.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lutjens View Post

Don't think it would cost more...all it would take is a snip to disable the onboard PCI-E clock generator in some chips and leave it active in others. The only added expense is for motherboard makers who have to include a clock generator for K SKUs. The person I asked works for Intel in their performance group. I don't want to mention names, but he'd definitely know...
wink.gif
By any chance, does he know when Skylake E will come out? This time next year? Any more details about the Purley platform? All we know is that it has 6 channels of RAM.

Sadly we will not see anything like an unlocked E5 1699 v3 (Lutjens has been asking Intel for some time for an unlocked 18 core variant).
mad.gif
mad.gif


Edit:
For those interested in Skylake E, give this a look.


Most disappointingly, no PCI-E 4.0 (could use that with the newer SSDs). Hopefully we'll see HEDT AVX 512 though (I suspect that is one reason for all the bandwidth from the six channel RAM).
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by CrazyElf View Post

By any chance, does he know when Skylake E will come out? This time next year? Any more details about the Purley platform? All we know is that it has 6 channels of RAM.
He knows, but can't say. As for Purley, the only additional information that I was able to glean at IDF was the ability of the platform to use 3D XPoint-based DIMMs (Skylake-EP will also).
Quote:
Sadly we will not see anything like an unlocked E5 1699 v3 (Lutjens has been asking shamelessly begging Intel for some time for an unlocked 18 core variant).
mad.gif
mad.gif
FTFY...
wink.gif
 

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Intel would gain from allowing aggregate clocking on non-K. The whole OC community grew and bought lower SKU chips to OC for fun, competitively, or just because that's what they could afford. But, locking out pretty much all OC possibilities on non-unlocked parts has shut off an entire market. Even if it's not a big one, they still lose nothing by opening that market back up.

If they're worried about warranty and reliability, just standardize a method to activate a h/w level switch/registrar with an agreement-prompt that when OCing non-K SKU CPUs Intel cannot guarantee stable operation or product lifespan, and the warranty will be voided, and detectable with that hardware switch that application or UEFI has changed.. Esp. with Intel's K SKU CPUs having OC warranties now, that is free advertisement there to upgrade to a K when you want more.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DesertRat View Post

Intel would gain from allowing aggregate clocking on non-K. The whole OC community grew and bought lower SKU chips to OC for fun, competitively, or just because that's what they could afford. But, locking out pretty much all OC possibilities on non-unlocked parts has shut off an entire market. Even if it's not a big one, they still lose nothing by opening that market back up.

If they're worried about warranty and reliability, just standardize a method to activate a h/w level switch/registrar with an agreement-prompt that when OCing non-K SKU CPUs Intel cannot guarantee stable operation or product lifespan, and the warranty will be voided, and detectable with that hardware switch that application or UEFI has changed.. Esp. with Intel's K SKU CPUs having OC warranties now, that is free advertisement there to upgrade to a K when you want more.
By allowing overclocking on the lower SKUs, it takes away the incentive to purchase the higher priced unlocked parts, which not only compromises margins, it works to undermine the need for a K SKU. What Intel needs to do is ensure their unlocked CPUs are fully enabled and are the very highly binned to allow those who buy them to get the maximum result from them. They also need to unlock the top SKU for every CPU they make, which would allow a prosumer or ultra high end enthusiast who desires to overclock the ability to choose their processor not so much on clock speed but on core count and die size. One unlocked SKU for each of the three die sizes would be all that's needed to permit a wide variety of options for HEDT enthusiasts.

The segmentation on the mainstream processors is fairly good, except that Intel needs to maintain the low end overclockable SKU that was introduced with the Pentium G3258 to permit users with limited budgets to have an entry point into the market as well.
 
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