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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The internet in general, computing, etc is suffering from major derpage and the worst part is that nobody can see it. We make the biggest advancements ever and then do the dumbest things with them.

So some of the stuff that really gets me... #1 "Streaming"

Back when I was a teenager using Napster to download files we never imagined that the internet would grow so much, where you would be able to have the speeds/unlimited bandwidth to just download lossless audio so we had to settle with 128kbps .mp3 files. This idea of "streaming" never occurred because it seemed just too stupid, even back then when such speeds/bandwith did not exist we would have never thought of that since the idea of "streaming" something if we had the speed/bandwith to instantly download it and have it forever made no sense.

So fast forward to today where that would be possible if we were all still using Kazaa or something we could all P2P each other FREE giant libraries of CD quality music. Nope P2P for individual files is more dead than ever. Were now STREAMING 128kbps .mp3 files, like the biggest advancement in technology used in the least efficient way ever, you could click once, spend 30 seconds and download the file and have it, OWN IT forever but nope people choose to "rent" an inferior version of it.

It's the same thing with movies and TV shows, etc...

You can download TV shows and Movies instantly in full Blueray/HD/Lossless in minutes off usenet yet nobody does, everybody is content with paying money to essentially rent compressed/downgrade content that they do not even technically own. Usenet, P2P, etc forget debating the legal part, you own the content physically it is in your possession forever, any other "streaming" service you are renting.

The convenience advantage of streaming vs downloaded with today's speeds/bandwidth is like seconds, maybe minutes. You'd need the attention span of a gold fish to think that's a good trade off.


#2 "Cloud Storage"

The idea of "could storage" did come up a few times reading PC mags back in the day, yet that's also when a 20-40gb HDD was the norm in a desktop. The idea made sense when storage was expensive and it would be advantageous to off load it to dedicated enterprise services. We canned the idea because the bandwidth/speeds to make that happen did not exist.

Nowadays you can buy terabyte size drives for next to nothing, more storage than you could ever need. So there's no need for it, yet everyone wants to store to the "cloud" stuff they could easily fit on an SD card now. Again instead of owning people are renting and trusting with someone else for something we could easily do now.

#3 Browsers, .exe's and "apps"

App stands for application, application to me is interchangeable with .exe, something that runs locally on the machine, that's how anybody from the glory days of computing would have seen it.

Yet half the stuff called "apps" now is ridiculously backwards, take peoples phones, bogged down with dozens upon dozens of "apps", yet it's all stuff that could be done in a web browser, nothing in almost any of these "apps" requires something that needs to be run on the local machine like an .exe style program. Unless you're talking about the spyware most of the "apps" turn into, in that case it's advantageous to run on the local machine as an .exe instead of a web browser service.

A web browser is supposed to be a "browser", basic read/write, you're "Browsing" after all, when you browse a store you don't take half of it with you, start making mods, etc, you're just browsing, that's all it should be.

It's massive security vulnerability for nothing. Half of the malware out now leverages JavaScript and other languages that execute stuff on the local machine. You can make fancy websites in plain HTML, the difference is it's a lot harder for corporations to spy on you and mine your info from a simple read/write HTML internet in traditional browsers as we used to know them.

There's stuff that should be run on the local machine, should be an "app" in other words, like Microsoft Office for example. Other stuff should be done through a Browser like your banking, car insurance, online orders, etc... Yet everything is backwards today. You sign up for car insurance through an "app" and run office suite software through a browser...


Last thing, Software as a Service model.

You don't "own" anything anymore, you don't own the games you play, movies, you don't even own your own operating system. MS decides when and what it will update for you. You don't own the hardware it's on, MS has boot loaders to prevent install of other OS's. Windows 10 locked to your hardware configuration and you can't install to another PC. MS, Google Apple decide what is best for you.


This is so darn ridiculous it's insane, the internet of today is literally taking steps back from where we were before.


People praise the internet for being this "free" and open discussion place yet it's more commercial now than ever with everything mining your information. Google, MS, etc control the platforms, control the ideas, control the information, what you see, control "the conversation".

Linux is closer to the old Microsoft OS model than Microsoft itself today. Usenet is more free, open, no censorship, open source than the actual WWW word wide public net. Everything is backwards.
 

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I'm offended by your first point because I have been enjoying Amazon Prime Video for the last several months (I'm late to the streaming party, heh). I have watched hundreds of hours of free content all without taking up any extra space on my computer, all in very high-quality 1080p resolution with surprisingly good audio quality. So, I like streaming simply because I can enjoy countless hours of content without it taking up any space on my computer. This is quite a brilliant concept.

So what do I do if I want to own what I'm watching? That's easy: I place an order for the physical copy of it. Or, if I don't want the physical copy, I just add it to what I own in my Amazon Prime video library. Again, that's a brilliant concept because I don't have to be concerned about one day realizing I'm running out of space because I spent a year collecting hundreds of movies.

I realize I could just buy large capacity hard drives, but that misses the point I'm making entirely. I like having the choice between downloading, streaming, or buying the physical media.

As for the rest of the rant, well, I don't agree about the part on web browsers because I use Firefox and dammit, I would hate it if Firefox were no different than Netscape was back in 1995.
 

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I agree with lots of the points the OP has made. Especially on steaming movies and operating systems/programs as a paid subscription. People area always talking about how great their 4k HDTV looks with netflix 4k content but when you put it up next to a 4k blu ray, its like comparing VHS to DVD. But what would you expect when streamed 4k is like 15Mb/s and 4k blu ray is 100Mb/s?

The main reason why so much software/movies/music is transitioning to subscription services is because these companies get to have recurring montly fees coming from consumers AND they accumulate massive amounts of data on each person, which is then sold to other companies for many reasons. There is also a lesser talked about reason as to why this is occuring and that's due to privacy laws. The 4th Amendment protects Americans fromi unlawful search and seizure 'by the Government' unless they have a warrant. The thing is, if companies like Google were to monitor and collect data on everything you do, it's technically not illegal for them to 'share' it with the Government because it wasn't obtained from direct spying on you. It's a lot like how the Obama Administration used the FBI to obtain a FISA warrant on Carter Page which then allowed them to spy on the Trump campaign.

There's a reason why the NSA built this massive data center in Utah a few years back. If you think none of the data they're obtaining is being provided by companies like google, then i got bridge i'll sell you. Cheap.

 

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Discussion Starter #5
So, I like streaming simply because I can enjoy countless hours of content without it taking up any space on my computer. This is quite a brilliant concept.

So what do I do if I want to own what I'm watching? That's easy: I place an order for the physical copy of it. Or, if I don't want the physical copy, I just add it to what I own in my Amazon Prime video library. Again, that's a brilliant concept because I don't have to be concerned about one day realizing I'm running out of space because I spent a year collecting hundreds of movies.

I realize I could just buy large capacity hard drives, but that misses the point I'm making entirely. I like having the choice between downloading, streaming, or buying the physical media.

As for the rest of the rant, well, I don't agree about the part on web browsers because I use Firefox and dammit, I would hate it if Firefox were no different than Netscape was back in 1995.
Lol missed the entire point... "I want to "own it" so I'll add it to my cloud storage service with Amazon"... Where if you likely read the TOS you probably don't actually own it.

What is so much easier about (insert x streaming service) vs the old back in the day way of you download, watched and if you're so ever concerned about storage space you deleted or chose to keep forever. Two extra clicks vs streaming if all you wanted to do is watch and never watch again.


As for web browsers and the web in general, madoxx (the best page in the universe) has good article on it from way back when. Basically if your website is interesting you don't need all sorts of shinny bunnies and rotating icons.

Oh here it is I'll quote the site.

madoxx; said:
Some webmasters have spent years tweaking their layout and designing their site, and very few get any traffic. This site, as * as it looks, gets over 1 million visits per month. I use large fonts also as a protest against all the stylish garbage you see out there. When I go to a web site, I WANT TO READ THE CONTENT. Trust me, that micro-font everyone uses isn't nearly as original as they think. I've chosen a black background for most of my text because it's easier on the eyes than staring at a white screen. Think about it: your monitor is not a piece of paper, no matter how hard you try to make it one. Staring at a white background while you read is like staring at a light bulb (don't believe me? Try turning off the lights next time you use a word processor). Would you stare at a light bulb for hours at a time? Not if you want to keep your vision.
It wouldn't be half bad if it wasn't a privacy/security issue but it is. The fancy layouts, flashy this and that all powered by Javascript most websites now all love to use is a huge security vulnerability and enables unprecedented data mining/privacy invasion.



Thinking back to around 2010, we had it perfect. You could P2P anything and BitTorrent anything, everything was free. We, us "computer people" won the copyright/DMCA/MPAA war of the 2000's. We had them beat, but then they outsmarted us. They developped streaming services, cloud services, etc to appeal to the inner ultra lazy in all of us, loaded everything with Javascript starting trading in personal info, etc and managed to "re-monetize" the internet using all that unbeknownst to us all while we think were getting stuff for free "streaming" various video content on Youtube or similar sites, etc...

We had it perfect, could have kept it that way and the tables turned.


The main reason why so much software/movies/music is transitioning to subscription services is because these companies get to have recurring montly fees coming from consumers AND they accumulate massive amounts of data on each person, which is then sold to other companies for many reasons.
There's a reason why the NSA built this massive data center in Utah a few years back. If you think none of the data they're obtaining is being provided by companies like google, then i got bridge i'll sell you. Cheap.
There we go, someone who has a clue. That's what it's all about right there. Data mining, making you dependent on your Amazon/Google overlords and "the cloud" all while collecting all possible information about you to market more stuff for you to buy and map you geopolitically.


Another thing I just thought of, were on a PC building forum full of people praising Windows 10. Part of the whole PC building sub culture is history with the whole IBM PC compatible clones, x86, PC kits, etc legacy... Yet everybody's praising Windows 10 which is the completely anti thesis to that, they don't want you to have your own PC and boot whatever OS you like. They actively try and lock out other OS's, lock the hardware, etc..
 

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My inner lazy is paying for Netflix and di.fm monthly but not using them ever once (family does) while I find not so legal ways of getting audio video because I rather have the ability to store it and make a physical copy on the go. Although in all respect if I like something I'll buy the copy digital or physical.

The problem with streaming is offline. Yes you can watch offline videos but this requires you have been logged into your account and special software which is normally the app itself just to play the video.






Sent from my HTC 10 using Tapatalk
 

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Streaming has made alot of content affordable for most people. For $10 a month you have access to a huge supply of movies on netflix, $10 gets you instant access to millions of songs on spotify and not to mention the millions of hours of content on youtube for "free". It provides a revenue stream for content creators and makes people far more efficient at consuming that content.

Sure you can download a 10GB movie and "own it forever". Why would you want that space taken up on your harddrive? When will you watch it again? What if you have 20 movies you like, What if its a TV show with 100's of episodes? You're just going to keep saving? ... Efficiency is what drives progress, and streaming if efficient, the cloud is efficient.
 

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Streaming has made alot of content affordable for most people. For $10 a month you have access to a huge supply of movies on netflix, $10 gets you instant access to millions of songs on spotify and not to mention the millions of hours of content on youtube for "free". It provides a revenue stream for content creators and makes people far more efficient at consuming that content.

Sure you can download a 10GB movie and "own it forever". Why would you want that space taken up on your harddrive? When will you watch it again? What if you have 20 movies you like, What if its a TV show with 100's of episodes? You're just going to keep saving? ... Efficiency is what drives progress, and streaming if efficient, the cloud is efficient.
Which is still correct until ISPs start throttling those services. 10 dollars plus another fee ontop your Internet bill

Sent from my HTC 10 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Streaming has made alot of content affordable for most people. For $10 a month you have access to a huge supply of movies on netflix, $10 gets you instant access to millions of songs on spotify and not to mention the millions of hours of content on youtube for "free". It provides a revenue stream for content creators and makes people far more efficient at consuming that content.

Sure you can download a 10GB movie and "own it forever". Why would you want that space taken up on your harddrive? When will you watch it again? What if you have 20 movies you like, What if its a TV show with 100's of episodes? You're just going to keep saving? ... Efficiency is what drives progress, and streaming if efficient, the cloud is efficient.
How hard is it to just delete something after you're done with it if you don't like how much space it takes. For $10 a month you could have an unlimited account on news server access and literally download every single movie, tv show, full CD quality album of your liking in a few more clicks than logging into some "streaming" "cloud" service. With the automation now, it's piss simple, the news clients fetch the new shows off RSS and automatically download them for you, literally just as fast as using Netflix but in higher quality audio/video oh and you own the physical copy forever if you chose to. Lol no people would rather "stream", go to some site which clickjacks their browser, mines coins or whatever.

The cloud is great if you like to relinquish all control to some all mighty higher up and can't do a single thing for yourself. In the whole cloud model, you own nothing, you read the TOS whether it's your games, movies, music whatever, you don't really "own" it, much like the software as a service model, windows 10, office 365, it's all about "renting" licenses, "renting" time wheres in the old software model you used to own things, legally and physically on your drive for you to access and do what you please at any time.

The whole "streaming" thing also pushes this idea that we need to be connected 24/7, naturally you need internet access for all these things to function, so you can have all your "apps" which are mining all sorts of info in the background, ON at all times, always "suggesting" more content, this or that. Have everything interlinked, log in with facebook into everything, have facebook be the universal authenticator...

We see this push for everything being on the "cloud" in everything, like even email providers dropping email clients/POP3 support, anything that keeps data on the local machine is being phased out. People would rather M$ to have total control of their email when there's perfectly fine better working client email software/protocols because it would take 10 minutes to setup instead of using a click and drool web interface "in the cloud".

So you end up with a situation where MS, Google, Amazon, Facebook and a handful of other companies literally have all your data whether that's personal, multimedia, etc, control access to it, know everything about you, and have a monopoly on the discussion platforms and the discussions being had.
 
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