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Can you have too much flow in a WC setup

Is it possable to have to much flow in your system?

2398 Views 56 Replies 20 Participants Last post by  SpaceCowboy
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Also please say why you voted the way you did. if you have something new to add.

Basically I would like to know from people that have exp with WC. can you have too much flow in your loop? As in can the water be moving too fast to dissipate the heat efficiently?
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No! Can it circulate as to not be efficient? Sure.

But NO!
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Originally Posted by eclipseaudio4
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Basically I would like to know from people that have exp with WC. can you have too much flow in your loop? As in can the water be moving too fast to dissipate the heat efficiently?

I see where you're coming from with this. In the automotive world the answer would be yes. You can run liquid through a radiator too fast to dissipate heat. I've never seen a test done to find minimum & maximum flow through a certain size PC radiator.
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Originally Posted by SpaceCowboy
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I see where you're coming from with this. In the automotive world the answer would be yes. You can run liquid through a radiator too fast to dissipate heat. I've never seen a test done to find minimum & maximum flow through a certain size PC radiator.

That was a great answer TY!
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No, You can have to much heat dump from the pump, anything over 50W or so and its just flattens out the cooling curve.

The faster the flow the more turbulence in the blocks and rad, in the block that means it will pick up more heat, in the rad it will dissipate more heat.

The faster the flow the more times the coolant will go through the rad and the block.

This is a pretty good run down, its with older pumps but it still holds true.How much pump is enough? How much is too much?
so an ehime1250 on cpu only and 120.2 is not too much?
I thought SpaceCowboy had a great response. It was simple and straight forward.

ira I think your response was also good.

I am still trying to sort out the fundamental/theoretical issues with too fast?

It sounds good in Space Cowboys post. It did slant toward the inability to dissipate? Well if it can't dissipate all else being equal why can it suddenly absorb great amounts?

Do not ever argue against a thermodynamic equilibrium?

2nd law of common sense never argue against the laws of thermodynamics?

But hey if you guys know better let's go for it.
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If I recall, Martin's test showed that after about 1.5GPM additional flow provided diminishing benefits, and that the heat dump needed to achieve that extra flow outweighed the gains. It's also possible for flow to increase to a rate where the fluid becomes laminar.
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Originally Posted by TonyL222 View Post
It's also possible for flow to increase to a rate where the fluid becomes laminar.
you couldnt be more wrong. flow will turn turbulent with increasing flowrates, and in the blocks, this is exactly what you want.
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Originally Posted by TonyL222
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It's also possible for flow to increase to a rate where the fluid becomes laminar.

Laminar
I though that's why most peeps used some type of water wetter (you know like Dawn DS)


Hmm..., I ain't never heard of having too much flow, I always figured it was better to have too much than not enough. Gots to reread the "diminishing returns deal" again.

DCing for the CURE
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Dawn
wouldn't that make bubbles? :swearing:
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You use a small amount (like 2small drops) & after the loop was blead.
2
ahhh I had a flashback to when I got my wife our first dishwasher. I installed it and decided to test it out. well to make a long story short I used dawn and made a LOT of bubbles!
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Originally Posted by ChielScape
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you couldnt be more wrong. flow will turn turbulent with increasing flowrates, and in the blocks, this is exactly what you want.

Well depends on how much flow you get. If you actually were able to get enough he would be right and you would be wrong. However it would be hard to do in a PC water cooling situation.
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Ok so the basic consensus is that you can not have too much flow in a PC WC setup? I should add a poll.
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Originally Posted by eclipseaudio4
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Ok so the basic consensus is that you can not have too much flow in a PC WC setup? I should add a poll.

OK from what I have scene with the water pumps usually available for pc cooling enthusiest is that no you wont have too much flow. You have to get into thermaldynamics and all that crap which I try to forget more then anything to prove all the times when flow will become too much. There are points when the boundary layer or laminar flow or whatever you wanna call it that is on the inside walls of your tubing and waterblock will increase. There is also a point that you can reach where the water is not in the rad long enough to get a proper heat transfer but I doubt anyone will get there.

Basically unless you had a huge pump and could actually harness all of that in little 1/2" tubing your not gonna have to worry about it. I think most water cooling pc's are trying to get as much flow as possible. We need to concentrate more on proper waterblock construction, flow path, rad construction, fans used, and restrictions more then anything.
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Originally Posted by eclipseaudio4
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so an ehime1250 on cpu only and 120.2 is not too much?

For the X2 5000+, or do you have another CPU in mind?
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yeah the X2 for now about 105-115w dissipation and for later upgrades but I know I will need a bigger rad later on for when I go to the X4's.
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