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I am going to go with the NH-D15 to cool an Intel Core i5-6500, and I am trying to build the quietest system that I can. So is it worth to replace the fans with the NF-F12 fans?
 

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No, and setting up a custom fan curve with the fans at minimum speed at idle CPU operations and ramping up with increasing CPU temperature would help with the noise aspect of the cooler.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skywind View Post

I am going to go with the NH-D15 to cool an Intel Core i5-6500, and I am trying to build the quietest system that I can. So is it worth to replace the fans with the NF-F12 fans?
As an owner of the A15 fans myself, if you are intent on low-noise, you need to manually set these fans to your noise-floor. For me it's 600-700RPM, but you may be able to get a bit higher; really depends on how quiet your room and your case is in general. Next you can set a custom fan curve via Speedfan (noting the temperatures/sensors) and then set how much you want these fans to ramp.

From my own testing on the D14 (P12, P14, A15s), you gain very little when running these at full speed. Across all cores, the difference was about 4C, but for the cost of a large increase in noise.Comparing my notes to SPCR's official review numbers - they saw similar results.
http://www.silentpcreview.com/article1395-page5.html

Furthermore, eHume's testing on his D14, the A14/A15 fans on Vortez, and his Overclockers D15 review, already highlight that the A15 is fine fan for the heatsink. There is no reason to replace them - the heatsink *and* provided fans are why you bought the D15 in the first place
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geggeg View Post

No, and setting up a custom fan curve with the fans at minimum speed at idle CPU operations and ramping up with increasing CPU temperature would help with the noise aspect of the cooler.
Indeed.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mav451 View Post

As an owner of the A15 fans myself, if you are intent on low-noise, you need to manually set these fans to your noise-floor. For me it's 600-700RPM, but you may be able to get a bit higher; really depends on how quiet your room and your case is in general. Next you can set a custom fan curve via Speedfan (noting the temperatures/sensors) and then set how much you want these fans to ramp.

From my own testing on the D14 (P12, P14, A15s), you gain very little when running these at full speed. Across all cores, the difference was about 4C, but for the cost of a large increase in noise.Comparing my notes to SPCR's official review numbers - they saw similar results.
http://www.silentpcreview.com/article1395-page5.html

Furthermore, eHume's testing on his D14, the A14/A15 fans on Vortez, and his Overclockers D15 review, already highlight that the A15 is fine fan for the heatsink. There is no reason to replace them - the heatsink *and* provided fans are why you bought the D15 in the first place
tongue.gif
Indeed!
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Dropping maximum fan speed by 300rpm generally only makes a few degrees difference in temps, but a much greater difference in noise level.

ehume also points out the Thermalright TY-140, 147A and TY-143 are just as good, maybe even a little better .. so close it really doesn't matter except for price and color. We should be seeing a TY-147A Sq (square housing) in the near future.

At least that is the reason most of use buy them.
tongue.gif
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mav451 View Post

Furthermore, eHume's testing on his D14, the A14/A15 fans on Vortez, and his Overclockers D15 review, already highlight that the A15 is fine fan for the heatsink. There is no reason to replace them - the heatsink *and* provided fans are why you bought the D15 in the first place
tongue.gif
The problem is that people immediately assume that "different" must mean "better", when they have not actually figured out what it is they have in the first place. Changing fans purely for the sake of changing them is rampant these days, and more often than not the change winds up being a downgrade or simply an exercise in spending money to achieve the exact same result.

In this particular case, a change to the NF-F12 would likely accomplish the opposite of the intended purpose. While the NF-F12 has lower peak noise level, it will also have a lower peak performance. When you compare performance at like noise levels, the NF-A15 is actually the quieter solution.
 
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