Overclock.net banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Linux > All
Joined
·
1,665 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The other day I tried migrating my main server / htpc tp Debian. Had a world of trouble. Mainly with LTSP not working correctly. Back to Ubuntu I went. However for my print server I had to create a Debian lxd container since cups wouldn't configure correctly on Ubuntu. An hour of troubleshooting and no dice. 2 commands in the Debian container and it was running flawlessly.

People debate about what to use. Can start a holy war if not careful. But no one distro is supreme. Optimal environment sometimes must be mixed. Just a thought. This experience has put me off fully using a single distro for everything. Right tool for the job best approach.
 

·
10 year OCN Vet
Joined
·
3,414 Posts
IMHO of course there is no "perfect distro" since by definition a distro is a set of packages built on a linux kernel. Some are extremely niche oriented and as long as that niche describes you, that might be close to perfect for you, for that set of jobs. The only exceptions to that are those few distros that don't assume how they will be used and simply provide a solid set of packages and build tools so you, the User/Admin, can customize it to be exactly what you want.

At the extreme end of that I suppose is Linux From Scratch but it only barely qualifies as a distro since everything is basically provided by you, a long and often tedious process. At the other end of that extreme is Debian which although it is extremely locked into it's own ways of doing things (and often locks out any deep changes) tries to be flexible by having the largest number of available packages in repositories. So on one end we have Total control by You and on the other Near Total control by Devs.

Personally given the choice between only those two, I'd choose LFS because any distro that has strict rules and does things for you eliminates you from the learning curve, which is the definition of convenience BUT you don't learn anything but how to conform to what is provided. I suspect this is why you found LTSP difficult to implement on Debian, since it is unlikely you ever learned what and how Ubuntu does that for you and have yet to learn how Debian does that for you.

If you were instead taught exactly how LTSP was implemented you could very likely accomplish that on any distro, making any or all of them "perfect"... assuming their rules didn't get in your way.

This is why I love Slackware. It is completely Vanilla and makes zero assumptions as to how it will be used. The installer has a Recommended Full Install but gives one the option to ignore that and effectively turn it into an assisted version of LFS or anything in between. I'm going to link a specific post that appeared in 2004, 14 years ago, with a step-by-step of how to not only install but OWN LTSP. It is substantially easier now with the advent of SlackBuilds but still requires the Admin/User to manually configure the .conf files which is a responsibility but also The Power... the power to make it behave like you want it to and the power of understanding why that is so.

Check this out =====>>> https://tinyurl.com/y8y5ad2s

Yes, it is a bit long and involved but gives you total control and understanding plus it's a great example of the level of help and education that comes from the Slackware Community. Maybe you'll find that "perfect".
 

·
BOINC Cruncher
Joined
·
1,866 Posts
Don't know if you were using this, Debian has a how-to install LTSP in their WIKI
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top