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The discovery allows for twice the bit density of today's disk drives. Nanolithography was used to make dense patterns of "magnetic islands" that appear as small dots in about 100,000 circular tracks required for disk drives.

This pattern has 1.2 trillion dots per square inch, showing the dense patterns of magnetic islands made by HGST Labs using such emerging nanotechnologies as self-assembling molecules, line doubling and nanoimprinting. Each dot can store a single bit of data (Source: HGST).
- See more at: http://www.itworld.com/hardware/345929/western-digital-claims-hdd-capacity-doubled-nanotech-breakthrough#sthash.tHjDEnfB.dpuf
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Yup
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well... WD is trying to milk HDDs as long as they can. cool none the less, 8TB HDDs.
 

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Maybe we might start seeing 2.5" HDDs in capacities larger than 1TB that aren't green drives or high-RPM drives that don't fit in laptops
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HAMR is supposed to be coming soon, but all these alternatives such as the patterns, shingles, Helium-filled etc. keep popping up in the mean time. Wonder what we'll see next.
 

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Isn't this "patterned media" by a different name? Hitachi and I think Toshiba are investing in this. Seagate and Western Digital are looking at HAMR.
 

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Western Digital owns HGST hard drives, and Toshiba drives are relabelled Hitachi...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nleksan View Post

Western Digital owns HGST hard drives, and Toshiba drives are relabelled Hitachi...
WD bought out HGST. As part of the acquisition to maintain competition, WD has to support Toshiba in the 3.5" market. However, Toshiba still continues to make their own 2.5" HDDs.
 

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Forgive my ignorance, but would this have any improvement on transfer speeds? or are we just talking capacity increases here?

Never really felt capacity was ever an issue on HDD technology. Transfer speeds is where they've always been lacking.
 

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Originally Posted by Thingamajig View Post

Forgive my ignorance, but would this have any improvement on transfer speeds? or are we just talking capacity increases here?

Never really felt capacity was ever an issue on HDD technology. Transfer speeds is where they've always been lacking.
It's all about cost efficiency, where capacity and production cost make up for the lack of speed.

If moving files faster than 70mb/s is your biggest issue, you're in the wrong side of the market.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thingamajig View Post

Forgive my ignorance, but would this have any improvement on transfer speeds? or are we just talking capacity increases here?

Never really felt capacity was ever an issue on HDD technology. Transfer speeds is where they've always been lacking.
Yes transfer speeds increase when density increases (assuming rotation speed is kept constant). Since density is higher, needles can read more stuff per revolution....in theory at least. It's a little more complicated and depends on other stuff as well.
 

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Modern drives can reach 110-130MB/second in sustained, Depending where on the disk your doing a sustained write too, And if its 7200rpm or 5400rpm (54's do about 80-90)
 

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Originally Posted by Rayleyne View Post

Modern drives can reach 110-130MB/second in sustained, Depending where on the disk your doing a sustained write too, And if its 7200rpm or 5400rpm (54's do about 80-90)
Certainly.

I've had my WD Black Caviar RAID0 setup do 180mb/s-200mb/s to my SSD.
 

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Same old same old.

Price, Capacity, Speed. Pick 2.

If you point me at IODrive, I will point you at a SAN.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thingamajig View Post

Forgive my ignorance, but would this have any improvement on transfer speeds? or are we just talking capacity increases here?

Never really felt capacity was ever an issue on HDD technology. Transfer speeds is where they've always been lacking.
Ya. The more dense it is, the more bits can be "seen" in a period of time. Won't help latencies or randoms any, but sequential will go up again.
 

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If you really want speed from mechanical drives, you have two options now...

1) High RPM drives like the VelociRaptor
2) High Capacity drives with 1TB Platters, short-stroked to 30-40% of their capacity

Either way will get you around 150MBs average speed, and if you put them in RAID0, you can get some seriously fast storage.
 

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Doesn't Windows still only recognize 2tb? Seems pointless. Cool, predictable, and pointless
 

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Does this mean I can turn my 83TB servers into 166TB servers?!

Oh please make it so.
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Originally Posted by TheBlindDeafMute View Post

Doesn't Windows still only recognize 2tb? Seems pointless. Cool, predictable, and pointless
If your on a 12 year old OS called XP then yes.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBlindDeafMute View Post

Doesn't Windows still only recognize 2tb? Seems pointless. Cool, predictable, and pointless
Quote:
In terms of getting Windows 8 to allow all of a disk drive's capacity to be addressable, Microsoft has programmed the OS to use a variety of methods to make this happen. One is using the Logical Block Addressing (LBA) method. In Matthew's words, "... each sector has a predefined size (until recently, 512 bytes per sector), and sectors are addressed in monotonically increasing order, beginning with sector 0 and going on to sector n where: n = (total capacity in bytes)/ (sector size in bytes) ."

Another method for making large disk drives work in Windows 8 is a scalable partitioning scheme called the GUID Partition Table, or GPT, that was created by a group of companies back in the 1990s.

Matthew writes, "GPT allows for up to 64-bits of information to store the number that represents the maximum size of a disk, which in turn allows for up to a theoretical maximum of 9.4 ZettaByte (1 ZB = 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 bytes)." GPT support was put into the 64-bit version of Windows Vista and will also be a part of Windows 8 combined with the UEFI boot protocol which Microsoft has already discussed.

Microsoft's Bryan Matthew writes, "Our partners are working hard to deliver Windows 8 based systems that use UEFI to help enable these innovative Windows 8 features and scenarios (e.g. Secure Boot, Encrypted Drive, and Fast Start-up). You can expect that when Windows 8 is released, new systems will support installing Windows 8 to, and booting from, a 3TB or bigger disk."
http://www.neowin.net/news/microsoft-details-how-windows-8-will-handle-large-hard-disk-drives
 
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