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ATTENTION: If anyone has anything to add please do. Respect is a must. I won't put up with disrespectful people and you will be reported.

UPDATE: I will be adding real photos in the near future to better demonstrate my process.

Lapping Kit

Lapping your CPU and Heatsink any make or model

Materials you will need.

Misc: Cotton rags, Rubbing alcohol/Isopropyl alcohol 90%-97% Walgreen's or Wal-Mart will carry this.

Aluminum Oxide Sandpaper: Grits ranging from 400 to 2500 depending. Normally 400 to 1500 will do. It's really how far you feel you should go. This can be purchased at any automotive store. I would suggest 4 sheets per grit. So if you want to lap both CPU and Heatsink, then you would need 8 sheets total for each grit.

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Oil: 3in1 oil will work just fine and this can be purchased almost anywhere. Grocery store, drug store…etc

Metal Polish & cloth: I would suggest a high grade metal polish, but the cheaper metal polishes will work. As far as polishing cloth the cotton rags will work fine, but if you want or feel you need the pricey stuff it's up to you.

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Glass base: ¼ inch thick piece of glass measuring 6x6 inch or 8x8 inch will be just fine. You really do not need to go any bigger. The reason to use a glass base to lap on is the fact that it is perfectly flat and that is exactly what you want.

Tape: Pretty much any tape will do, gift wrap tape/painters tape. Painters tape is probably better.


Starting


Take a Black Sharpie marker and either mark an X on the surface to be lapped or you can cover the entire surface. Either way will work.

After you have taped the sandpaper down and starting with the lowest grit. You want to start by move the CPU/Heatsink back and forth for a few seconds. Example below





Then rotate the CPU/Heatsink 45 degrees and repeat. Example below



After doing this repeatedly, you will have gone full circle with the CPU/Heatsink. Example below



As the copper starts to build you can now add the oil. Personally I do not add the oil until I reach the 800grit paper. Some people use oil during the entire process. Either way is fine. Just remember when starting on the lower grits "dry" the CPU/Heatsink will want to jump/jitter forward because of the friction.

One important thin to remember is to ALWAYS stay flat. Your hand automatically wants rock back and forth when you sand. Apply even pressure to the CPU/Heatsink, but to not bear down on it or you could damage your parts or even crack the glass.

Heatsink: Some people assume just having the middle lapped is fine. That is incorrect. See Examples below. The reason you want both CPU and Heatsink both 100% lapped is to ensure they are both connecting and able to transfer the heat as much as possible. Remember some heatsinks are large and heavy and when mounted onto the CPU they tend to bow the motherboard or lean down. Making sure both are 100% lapped will ensure is does not do this. For those with large heatsinks, it is a good idea to brace/tie down the heatsink so it does not lean down while the PC is standing upright.

Now if only the middle part is lapped you run the chance of actually having worse temps than when you started and only lapping the CPU or the Heatsink is pointless. Both need to be lapped to drop your temps because neither is perfect from the factory.









Please: Anyone that is experienced please add info or PM me so I can add to this. I am not an expert at this, but I see a lot of people wanting to lap without the knowledge needed. Advise and question are welcome. Rude comments,obnoxious behavior will be reported.

Here is a great tutorial over at DFI boards Picture Tutorial - How to make things shine

Best of luck!

A little help from HatesFury. I will add more and straighten things soon.

Quote:

Originally Posted by HatesFury View Post
Stay with 400 grit until you have a level HSF, the increase in grits is only to incrase smoothness, 400 is what you want to use to remove copper. Look for a pattern to the high spots (such as one side, or one corner). Adjust to correct high spots (apply MORE pressure on the high spot than on the low spot) make a few passes (3-5) and check the level again. Applying more pressure to part of the HSF is going to make drastic changes to it, so you only want to make a few passes then recheck or you'll grind too much off


Every guide i've ever seen tells people to use uniform pressure for lapping. This is true when you're trying to maek the HSF smoother, but not when you're trying to level an uneven HSF. If you're holding uniform pressure on a HSF that has a slop, you're sanding the whole surface at once, which makes the HSF hold the slop. To correct uneven blocks you must apply pressure to the high spots to wear them down, then go to uniform pressure once you've worked the highspot out to get a nice level finish, then you polish. This is more complicated than a simple polish job, and it takes more care.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Quote:

Originally Posted by Refresh View Post
This would've been really helpful a couple of days ago...
Yeah, Watching all the comments in your thread made me put it together.
 

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GREAT im gonna order a lapping kit tonight +rep
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by shizdan View Post
GREAT im gonna order a lapping kit tonight +rep
great! Hopefully some more folks that have experience will start posting and help out.

Post some pic's when you start.
 

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Hi, welldone. I just went into supermarket to purchase sandpaper and a glas for a lap job and I only needed to guide to do it. As I now found it, I can start. Thx a lot for this well-structured guide. +rep.

I've got a question though, what kind of oil can I use as I'm not sure what this 3in1 oil is(I'm not from the US and a non-native English speaker)?
And is a decent lap job possible with sandpaper grit from 400-1000 or do I need higher one's as well?

thx in advance

luk
 

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Discussion Starter #7
hey Luk, Here is a pic of the 3-in-1 oil



I do not believe America is the only place to by it, basically any standard household oil/lubricant.

as far as grits,I would suggest a minimum of 1500 grit. You not just trying to get it flat but also the little scratches/dips in the surface of the CPU and Heatsink that are hard to see with the eye. The more contact the better. Good luck and post as many questions as you want=)
 

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Just a question and I am a noob sorry. What does lapping do? How does it help with heat? and so on I want to get all info I can about it if possible. Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Quote:

Originally Posted by GriZzlEnLS View Post
Just a question and I am a noob sorry. What does lapping do? How does it help with heat? and so on I want to get all info I can about it if possible. Thanks
hey GriZzlEnLS, Lapping the CPU and Heatsink makes both surfaces as flat as possible for better heat transfer. The mirror shine everyone talks about really helps. Normally when applying the thermal paste,the paste is filling in the areas where both surfaces do not touch correctly. Lapping flattens them both out so you only need a very small amount of thermal paste or TIM to seat the two together. Also all those little scratches are removed when lapping to better help heat transfer. Hope that helped.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by GriZzlEnLS View Post
Just a question and I am a noob sorry. What does lapping do? How does it help with heat? and so on I want to get all info I can about it if possible. Thanks
go to the 1st post in this thread , its about the best guide ive seen , step by step
 

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I prefer using water over oil (less damaging to the thermal paste between heatspreader and CPU die, if you get it in the vent, and the sandpaper lasts longer) and I have noticed virtually no difference in performance between two very flat, and two slightly convex surfaces. The latter seems to have a lensing effect and spreads the thermal compound more thinly in the center, where the die of the chip is.

Otherwise, I like it.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Blameless View Post
I prefer using water over oil (less damaging to the thermal paste between heatspreader and CPU die, if you get it in the vent, and the sandpaper lasts longer) and I have noticed virtually no difference in performance between two very flat, and two slightly convex surfaces. The latter seems to have a lensing effect and spreads the thermal compound more thinly in the center, where the die of the chip is.

Otherwise, I like it.
how could anyone possibly get it in the vent and leave it there? i knew someone couldnt resist overanalyzing lapping
 

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Small C&C... i think your advice on alcohol is BAD... 70% is NOT what you want to be cleaning PC parts with. 70% is an oil based alcohol, and will leave residue on your parts. I never advsie anyone to use anything less then 90% alcohol on PC parts... rest looks like good stuff
 
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Discussion Starter #20
Quote:

Originally Posted by Blameless View Post
I prefer using water over oil (less damaging to the thermal paste between heatspreader and CPU die, if you get it in the vent, and the sandpaper lasts longer) and I have noticed virtually no difference in performance between two very flat, and two slightly convex surfaces. The latter seems to have a lensing effect and spreads the thermal compound more thinly in the center, where the die of the chip is.

Otherwise, I like it.
I use oil becuase it is non conductive if any where to be left on it. As far as TIM,I only use a half a grain of uncooked rice size when I apply it. Maybe a bit less.

Quote:

Originally Posted by HatesFury View Post
Small C&C... i think your advice on alcohol is BAD... 70% is NOT what you want to be cleaning PC parts with. 70% is an oil based alcohol, and will leave residue on your parts. I never advsie anyone to use anything less then 90% alcohol on PC parts... rest looks like good stuff

Noted and Added/Fix hadn't noticed I put 70% in there. Thanks and Rep
 
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