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Discussion Starter #1
hey guys,

kinda new to this. just got a desktop and wanna make some upgrades over the next 6 months or so. i just want to know which purchase would be most benefitial for future upgrades on my desktop? i like gaming, but also use this computer for autocad, photoshop, etc....

evga p55 or asus p7p55d motherboard?

550-700 w power supply?

or gtx 260, gtx 275 graphics card?

im thinking motherboard first but not alltogether sure. i would like to overclock some, as i hear the i7 860 is a beast for this and a couple other tweaks here and there.

let me know what you think.
 

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If your talking about your Dell, I don't know if you can upgrade the motherboard....

A while back they used to make them prorpietary, so I couldn't upgrade my motherboard. The GPU and PSU shouldn't be a problem, tho.
 

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A motherboard is a good start, so you can OC that 860! After that, definitely GPU and/or power supply. You can definitely push higher than that GTS 240. Oh yeah, invest in a nice CPU cooler, too, because stock won't handle all that heat from OCing.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
i just did a bunch of searching and yielded no results on whether dell still uses proprietary parts or not. i found that the last series, xps 720 or something like that used an atx motherboard so it could be upgraded. as to whether this feature was transferred to the new models i dont know.

i hope not, i would really like to start upgrading as i need it.
can anyone else find anything on the matter?

i guess i will go with the ps first as i will need it to upgrade my graphics card.
the corsair 650 fits nicely i read somewhere.

if anyone else has any advise on the direction i should go or just general information then let me know.
thanks guys
 

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Discussion Starter #6
my laptop decided to crap out on me for the 3rd time....hp piece of ****. and i needed a computer asap because finals were quickly approaching. i bought this whole setup for $650 whereas the monitor, cpu, ram and hdd alone would have cost pretty close to that. so why not get a computer now and upgrade it as i see fit?

just asking for some advice.....
 

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Your going to need a stronger PSU to run a GTX 200 series effectively, you need to take into account not only wattage of the PSU but how many amps it can put through the 12V rails, i would guess a 500W min for about 30amps per rail

EDIT: ps. as far as replacing the motherboard goes you would need to do a rebuild of the computer, be sure to have all the drivers you would need as the dell drivers your computer came with would lawl at what your trying to make them do.
 

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yea, you can get the gtx 260 from dell, so the ps can handle at least that, but i was thinking a 275 or 285, maybe an ati?

i was thinking about this ps:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16817139005
already checked forums and multiple people have swapped this out without a problem.

as for the motherboard upgrade. dell didnt include a operating system disk, but they did include the drivers. it has the pre-loaded software on the hard drive. after the motherboard swap, would i still be able to access the operating system stored on the hard drive or would i have to have dell ship me an installation disk?
 

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System requirements for a GTX260

System Requirements Minimum 500W or greater system supply (with a minimum 12V current rating of 36A)

Go with a 4890. It owns a GTX260 any day of the week and you can still use your 240 for Physx.

Here is one for $185, free shipping which is about what you'd pay for a GTX260, +/- $20.00.
Edit: Let me make myself clear, it doesn't just own it, it crushes a 260.
 

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Before you start yanking parts out there's a few things to be aware of.

First, once you make some major hardware changes (primarily the motherboard) you'll probably have to reinstall the OS which could cause some headaches with the install provided with the computer (it may yell at you for trying to install it on a "different" computer). A CPU at stock speeds often adversely impacts gaming performance, the sweet spot being between 3.4-3.8 Ghz, depending on the game and other hardware in the system. Also the cooling/case, RAM & PSU in Dells are usually not designed for performance gaming or overclocking. At a bare minimum I would not trust their PSUs to handle the additional load and maintain steady voltages needed for overclocking, which could fry other components if it fails.
 

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when i had my hp pc prior to my new alienware, i too contemplated upgrading it exactly how you are now. if you swap out mobo's, you will have to re-install your os. so if you don't have the software or someone you can borrow one from, you are going to have to plunk down extra money for that. as for the rest of the upgrades, i think a psu should be done first. it will allow you to run a bigger gpu. i think at least a quality 500-watt will cover you. as for your cpu, i am not sure you can even oc it with the mobo you are using. if you can, that's great. i just know that the only pre-built pc i have ever been able to oc on is my alienware. either way, if you do end up oc'ing your cpu, you will need more power. so just one more reason to upgrade the psu first. it looks like you are set on ram. another thing is the gpu. if you can afford it, i would really look into one of the newer ati cards. they are awesome and will cover your gaming for a long time. if you can't afford that, look into a gtx 260 or 275. they are very reasonably priced for their performance. and if you still have money to spend and want a decent performance boost, check out a new ssd. i think newegg still has ocz 30gb's on sale for $100 each. you could run a couple of those in raid.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by psi_guy
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when i had my hp pc prior to my new alienware, i too contemplated upgrading it exactly how you are now. if you swap out mobo's, you will have to re-install your os. so if you don't have the software or someone you can borrow one from, you are going to have to plunk down extra money for that. as for the rest of the upgrades, i think a psu should be done first. it will allow you to run a bigger gpu. i think at least a quality 500-watt will cover you. as for your cpu, i am not sure you can even oc it with the mobo you are using. if you can, that's great. i just know that the only pre-built pc i have ever been able to oc on is my alienware. either way, if you do end up oc'ing your cpu, you will need more power. so just one more reason to upgrade the psu first. it looks like you are set on ram. another thing is the gpu. if you can afford it, i would really look into one of the newer ati cards. they are awesome and will cover your gaming for a long time. if you can't afford that, look into a gtx 260 or 275. they are very reasonably priced for their performance. and if you still have money to spend and want a decent performance boost, check out a new ssd. i think newegg still has ocz 30gb's on sale for $100 each. you could run a couple of those in raid.

take note many 500W psu units do not push enough amps through the 12V rails to run a gtx 275 and up at 100% capacity
 

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Discussion Starter #13
thanks for the help guys.
so what you are saying is that a power supply, proly 650w + should probably be my first upgrade.
i have been looking at some ati graphics cards....possibly an early christmas present to myself

and it would be easier to run the o.s. from a disk instead of the pre-installed on my hard drive?
once i take care of these 3 things, probably after christmas, then i will work on cooling and possibly some mild overclocking. definitely have to work my way up before i try any hardcore numbers.
what cpu numbers would produce a stable rig with my i7? (given adequate cooling of course)
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by millerlite3421
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thanks for the help guys.
so what you are saying is that a power supply, proly 650w + should probably be my first upgrade.
i have been looking at some ati graphics cards....possibly an early christmas present to myself

and it would be easier to run the o.s. from a disk instead of the pre-installed on my hard drive?
once i take care of these 3 things, probably after christmas, then i will work on cooling and possibly some mild overclocking. definitely have to work my way up before i try any hardcore numbers.
what cpu numbers would produce a stable rig with my i7? (given adequate cooling of course)

well the OS was preinstalled before it was shipped to you in approximately the same manner you will install it again, no difference
 

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Originally Posted by kvmn82
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well the OS was preinstalled before it was shipped to you in approximately the same manner you will install it again, no difference

true, just didnt know if i could load it from the hdd or if it required a disk

which mobo and video card would you suggest? max budget is proly $450 or so.

i had looked at a couple earlier, just wasnt sure if micro atx was the way to go, i dont know if just an atx would fit in my dell xps 8000.
 

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millerlite3421,

I don't know what computer case you have, so don't know what kind of air flow you have through the case. Cooling an overclocked CPU on air means that air flow and ambient temperature are important to what you can do to move heat away from the heatsink.



I recently got my i7-860 to 4233MHz on air cooling. I have not yet stress tested it for 8 hours. My Antec Twelve Hundred case makes this possible along with the Thermalright Ultra-120 eXtreme heatsink.

You can see my system below my signature.
 

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Originally Posted by Farwalker
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millerlite3421,

I don't know what computer case you have, so don't know what kind of air flow you have through the case. Cooling an overclocked CPU on air means that air flow and ambient temperature are important to what you can do to move heat away from the heatsink.

i have a dell studio xps 8000. cooling will probably be a factor, when/if i overclock in the future.
plan on making upgrades to the power supply then video card, then possibly move on to a motherboard and better cooling for overclocking.

had to get a computer fast, and got this one for pretty cheap so i just thought i would upgrade it as i saw fit.
 
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