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Discussion Starter #1
<b>WARNING: Strong language and extremely poor engineering present in this article. Viewer discretion is advised.</b><br />
<br />
<img src="http://fc08.deviantart.net/fs70/i/2010/185/5/2/LBJ2_p1_by_Phaedrus2401.jpg" border="0" alt="" onload="NcodeImageResizer.createOn(this);" /><br />
<br />
Well, looky what I got. It's a turd in a box!<br />
<br />
<img src="http://fc01.deviantart.net/fs70/i/2010/185/0/6/LBJ2_p2_by_Phaedrus2401.jpg" border="0" alt="" onload="NcodeImageResizer.createOn(this);" /><br />
<br />
Seriously, have you ever seen a product box as bland as this? A picture of the power supply and the word "POWER" with a cheap photoshop globe effect in the background... There's no mention of the company/brand (Linkworld) no advertising BS, no specifications, nothing, just cheap cheap cheap. Utterly generic.<br />
<br />
The box is extremely light too, like it might float away in a stiff breeze.<br />
<br />
<img src="http://fc04.deviantart.net/fs70/i/2010/185/c/d/LBJ2_p3_by_Phaedrus2401.jpg" border="0" alt="" onload="NcodeImageResizer.createOn(this);" /><br />
<br />
And here we have the model #. The average customer might not be able to tell, since it's just a stuck on sticker that you can't even tell if it's from the manufacturer or the store. But that's what it is: a Linkworld LPJ2 430W.<br />
<br />
<img src="http://fc01.deviantart.net/fs70/i/2010/185/d/1/LPJ2_p4_by_Phaedrus2401.jpg" border="0" alt="" onload="NcodeImageResizer.createOn(this);" /><br />
<br />
And here we have the contents of the box. A power cord and a power supply and <i>hey wait a minute...</i><br />
<br />
<img src="http://fc01.deviantart.net/fs71/i/2010/185/b/9/LPJ2_p5_by_Phaedrus2401.jpg" border="0" alt="" onload="NcodeImageResizer.createOn(this);" /><br />
<img src="http://fc07.deviantart.net/fs71/i/2010/185/c/3/LPJ2_p6_by_Phaedrus2401.jpg" border="0" alt="" onload="NcodeImageResizer.createOn(this);" /><br />
<i>They're not the same power supply.</i> The one on the box has one of those monitor plugs, while the one inside instead has a power switch and voltage selector switch. The one Gabe Torres got two years ago had the monitor plug; guess they've made some revisions. Can anyone say "borderline false advertising"? Granted I prefer this version, but how cheap are these guys?<br />
<br />
(very)<br />
<br />
Also, I just thought of something. Gabe's version had the monitor plug and no voltage selector switch... That means that his version can only use 115V input (since it lacks active PFC). However, his version also had upgraded versions of components used purely on the 230V input. Which means that those upgraded components were... <b>ENTIRELY POINTLESS</b>. Hold on tight, folks, I'll be saying that a lot.<br />
<br />
Let's talk about the exterior more.<br />
<br />
<img src="http://fc06.deviantart.net/fs70/i/2010/185/2/0/LPJ2_p7_by_Phaedrus2401.jpg" border="0" alt="" onload="NcodeImageResizer.createOn(this);" /><br />
<br />
Here we have the cables, and cost cutting is extremely evident. The wires are very thin, 20AWG, while the recommended gauge is 18AWG. The loadout is as follows:<br />
x1 ATX 20+4 pin<br />
x1 ATX12V 4 pin<br />
x2 Molex<br />
x2 SATA<br />
x1 Floppy<br />
<br />
The connectors are all different, colors, indicating that they were picked to come from the cheapest source. The SATA connectors are obvious modifications to an original design, being black vs. translucent or white like the original connectors.<br />
<br />
<img src="http://fc09.deviantart.net/fs70/i/2010/185/e/2/LPJ2_p8_by_Phaedrus2401.jpg" border="0" alt="" onload="NcodeImageResizer.createOn(this);" /><br />
<br />
The exterior casing is about as generic as it gets. Note that there is no sleeving on the cables at all, even a plastic sleeve where they leave the housing. That means that these thin wires with their thin insulation will be rubbing up against bare metal. Can anyone else say "inevitable short circuit"?<br />
<br />
There is very little space for airflow. I forgot to mention earlier, the unit uses an 80mm rear fan. Ok, fine, but at least give adequate venting for air to enter the power supply. Instead it just has a few holes punched through the case metal, which is, by the way, 0.5mm aluminum that bends very easily.<br />
<br />
Oh, and you can see where a zip tie holding an internal component comes through under the cabling. Whoops.<br />
<br />
<img src="http://fc05.deviantart.net/fs70/i/2010/185/c/c/LPJ2_p9_by_Phaedrus2401.jpg" border="0" alt="" onload="NcodeImageResizer.createOn(this);" /><br />
<br />
Here we have the specification table, which lists info on all kinds of LPJ2 models from 180W to 500W. I'm curious to look at the &lt;250W models, because... Oops, spoilers. <img src="/images/smilies/tongue.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Stick Out Tongue" class="inlineimg" /><br />
<br />
Ours is the 430W model, which gives us:<br />
+3.3V - 25A<br />
+5V - 34A<br />
+12V - 18A<br />
Combined +5V and +3.3V - 190W Max<br />
<br />
Remember those figures, folks, 'cause we'll be talking about them later.<br />
<br />
Anyway, these amperage ratings are typical of a low-end power supply adapted from a Pentium 3-era design, when computers drew mainly from the +5V and +3.3V rails, instead of the +12V like modern machines. The +12V rail is beefed up a little, but really a "430W" power supply should have a +12V amperage of at least 32A, over half again what this claims it can do.<br />
<br />
It also provides a service number which would be helpful for submitting an RMA when this garbage inevitably self-immolates, except that there's no warranty card in the box, no contact info on the outside of the box, and Linkworld's website is a ****ing turd. Wonderful.<br />
<br />
<img src="http://fc09.deviantart.net/fs71/i/2010/185/9/4/LPJ2_p11_by_Phaedrus2401.jpg" border="0" alt="" onload="NcodeImageResizer.createOn(this);" /><br />
<br />
Looking on the bottom of the unit we find--da da-DA! MORE COST CUTTING!!!! Rather than use, you know, $0.005 standoffs to lift the main PCB off the casing they just punch and raise sections of the case. Fantastic. This also gives the user an idea of how thin and flexible the casing really is.<br />
<br />
<img src="http://fc02.deviantart.net/fs70/i/2010/185/7/6/LPJ2_p10_by_Phaedrus2401.jpg" border="0" alt="" onload="NcodeImageResizer.createOn(this);" /><br />
<br />
Let's break the warranty sticker and see what's inside this piece of trash.<br />
<br />
Here are some overall views for you to digest.<br />
<br />
<img src="http://fc04.deviantart.net/fs70/i/2010/185/1/4/LPJ2_p12_by_Phaedrus2401.jpg" border="0" alt="" onload="NcodeImageResizer.createOn(this);" /><br />
<img src="http://fc05.deviantart.net/fs71/i/2010/185/b/a/LPJ2_p13_by_Phaedrus2401.jpg" border="0" alt="" onload="NcodeImageResizer.createOn(this);" /><br />
<img src="http://fc04.deviantart.net/fs71/i/2010/185/3/b/LPJ2_p14_by_Phaedrus2401.jpg" border="0" alt="" onload="NcodeImageResizer.createOn(this);" /><br />
<br />
So let's start off looking at the fan.<br />
<br />
<img src="http://fc06.deviantart.net/fs70/i/2010/185/a/c/LPJ2_p15_by_Phaedrus2401.jpg" border="0" alt="" onload="NcodeImageResizer.createOn(this);" /><br />
<br />
It's pretty generic. I looked up the model # and only got a couple results, mostly in Chinese. It appears to be from a brand, either "Aeolus" or "LM-Computers". I can't tell which. If it's the Aeolus one then it's a 2800RPM 30.5CFM 80mm fan, assuming the specs are correct. The fan wires are the thinnest I've seen used in a PC power supply to date, only 22AWG.<br />
<br />
Now let's do an intensive study of the primary side.<br />
<br />
<img src="http://fc05.deviantart.net/fs70/i/2010/185/7/9/LPJ2_p16_by_Phaedrus2401.jpg" border="0" alt="" onload="NcodeImageResizer.createOn(this);" /><br />
<br />
This power supply is based on the antiquated half-bridge design, which has in quality units been almost universally replaced by the far superior double forward topography. Just a quick glance over the PCB is worrying; there are many silkscreened locations for components, yet there are no components in those locations, or they've been replaced with junctions (just a length of unshielded wire). There's hot glue everywhere. No joke; hot glue. Wherever you'd normally see top-side soldering or tacky insulation, instead there's hot glue. Hell, it's just drizzled all over the place. Why not? It's not like any effort went into this thing at any point in its creation, so why should we expect effort in PCB construction?<br />
<br />
Let's go by the numbers, starting with the transient filter.<br />
<br />
<b>1.</b>...<br />
What transient filter?<br />
<br />
There are only two lonely Y-capacitors present on the transient filter, which if you don't know is a series of components designed to filter electrical noise and surges from the AC input. Normally I expect to see several Y-capacitors, several X-capacitors, a couple of ferrite coils, and a metal-oxide varistor (MOV, essential for filtering surges). Instead there's only the two Y-capacitors. Hell, even if all the components present on the silkscreen were included the transient filter would still be ridiculously anemic, with no place for a MOV to even fit in. Two Y-capacitors alone are not enough to filter the input to a useful degree, making them mostly worthless.<br />
<br />
<b>2.</b> Here we have this power supply's only protection that I can identify: a fuse. Now, the concept of a fuse is very simple. You have your circuit, and you put in a fuse that's rated lower than your other lowest rated component. If you have a short circuit or surge, the fuse will be the first thing to fail, sparing everything else on the circuit.<br />
<br />
Linkworld failed this concept on two accounts. First, testing has shown that the fuse is one of the <i>last</i> components in this power supply to fail when it's loaded up, usually failing on as the result of other components failing. Second, a fuse is supposed to be easy to replace, usually being attached to a fuse holder. This is instead both soldered and hot glued into place so it's nigh impossible to replace. These two things mean that this power supply's one and only protection is--you guessed it--<b>COMPLETELY POINTLESS</b>.<br />
<br />
<b>3.</b> Here we have our first silicon component. Normally in quality power supplies you have a single diode pack or rectifying bridge, which is attached to the primary heatsink. In this case Linkworld opted for the cheaper "four diode" approach. These two that are standing upright are the two for the 115VAC (American/Canadian) input. They are IN5406 diodes rated at 3A. Since computer PSUs are switch mode PSUs only one will be in use at a time, so even though there are two the effective rating for both is 3A. 3A*115V = 345W from the AC input. Assuming that this power supply is 80% efficient (very, VERY generous) that means this power supply can only deliver 276W before these components fail. Assuming a more realistic 70% efficiency the PSU could deliver only 241W before these parts failed.<br />
<br />
Um, guys, isn't this a 430W power supply? Guys?<br />
<br />
<b>4.</b> Next we have the diodes for the 230VAC input. I could not identify these components, as their logos are obscured and I don't have my soldering iron handy. However, judging by the smaller size and typical practice for manufacturers like Linkworld I believe they are rated at 1.5A to give the same rating as their 115VAC equivalents.<br />
<br />
Interesting to note, in Gabriel Torres' 500W sample of this PSU the 230VAC diodes were rated at 3A as well. This is interested because his power supply did not have a voltage selector switch, and thus could not use 230VAC input, meaning that those upgraded diodes were--yet again--<b>COMPLETELY POINTLESS</b>.<br />
<br />
<b>5.</b> This is the +5VSB transistor, or one of them at least. It's a C2057S.<br />
<br />
<b>6.</b> The two primary switchers are STD13007 transistors.<br />
<br />
<b>7.</b> Finally, a word on the heatsinks. In case you can't tell these are extremely cheap, feeling like cast metal. They will technically cool the components attached to them, but I don't think they could dissipate the heat an inefficient 430W could put out.<br />
<br />
Finally we have the primary capacitors.<br />
<br />
<img src="http://fc00.deviantart.net/fs70/i/2010/185/3/3/LPJ2_p17_by_Phaedrus2401.jpg" border="0" alt="" onload="NcodeImageResizer.createOn(this);" /><br />
<br />
Canicon? You sure conned me! Canicon are considered among the worst electrolytic capacitors available.<br />
<br />
As a final remark on the primary, this power supply has no power factor correction, either active or passive.<br />
<br />
<img src="http://fc07.deviantart.net/fs71/i/2010/185/7/f/LPJ2_p18_by_Phaedrus2401.jpg" border="0" alt="" onload="NcodeImageResizer.createOn(this);" /><br />
<br />
Here we have the transformers, the cylinders with bars over them. These do the majority of the work, stepping the high-voltage AC down to low-voltage AC to be rectified by the secondary. From top to bottom these are the main transformer, PWM isolation transformer, and +5VSB transformer. There's no way to obtain a rating on these, but I've seen larger main transformers in 250W power supplies.<br />
<br />
<img src="http://fc07.deviantart.net/fs71/i/2010/185/a/f/LPJ2_p19_by_Phaedrus2401.jpg" border="0" alt="" onload="NcodeImageResizer.createOn(this);" /><br />
<br />
Hey, it's our old pal Fuhjyyu! You know, the capacitors that ruined Antec's reputation back in 2005/6 because they would inevitably fail after approximately 6-18 months of use? Yeah, them! ... Joy.<br />
<br />
Also, you see their logo? That's Fuhjyyu's thing: their logo is designed to look almost exactly like Hitachi's (a decent Japanese brand), especially with the blurry printing they use on their caps. They are, essentially, counterfeit Hitachi capacitors when they don't have Fuhjyyu printed on them.<br />
<br />
Oh, and check out all those component leads on the bottom! Let's take a moment to look at the soldering.<br />
<br />
<img src="http://fc02.deviantart.net/fs71/i/2010/185/0/a/LPJ2_p20_by_Phaedrus2401.jpg" border="0" alt="" onload="NcodeImageResizer.createOn(this);" /><br />
<br />
Ok, this is pretty rough.<br />
<br />
<img src="http://fc04.deviantart.net/fs70/i/2010/185/0/f/LPJ2_p21_by_Phaedrus2401.jpg" border="0" alt="" onload="NcodeImageResizer.createOn(this);" /><br />
<br />
Ok, screw rough, my five-year-old cousin would be ashamed of soldering like this. Their solder mask is garbage and it doesn't look like they bothered to trim a single lead leaving a bunch of potential short circuits waiting to happen. Their "standoff" is that big white plastic thingy, and there's only one. The rest of the "standoffs" are just raised sections of casing, and since the casing is so flimsy they could bend at the slightest shock. The slightest bit of rough treatment, and these component leads are going to be touching the casing, causing a short circuit. This is DISASTROUSLY bad build quality. It's unacceptable. No, Linkworld, I'm not going to tolerate this.<br />
<br />
<img src="http://fc06.deviantart.net/fs70/i/2010/185/8/1/LPJ2_p22_by_Phaedrus2401.jpg" border="0" alt="" onload="NcodeImageResizer.createOn(this);" /><br />
<br />
LEC-026 is apparently the PCB design number, but I can't find any info on it. "PCB Changing by WJZ". I suppose WJZ, whoever or whatever that is, is the one who told Linkworld what components they could safely cut, though apparently they didn't explain it very well judging by Linkworld's choice of what to upgrade/cut on its higher-wattage models (upgraded 230VAC diodes on a 230VAC-incapable PSU).<br />
<br />
Now let's look at the secondary.<br />
<br />
<img src="http://fc02.deviantart.net/fs71/i/2010/185/d/9/LPJ2_p23_by_Phaedrus2401.jpg" border="0" alt="" onload="NcodeImageResizer.createOn(this);" /><br />
<br />
Here we have the secondary transistors, which are the main components that determine the ratings of the various rails.<br />
<br />
<b>1.</b> This is the +5V transistor, and is a SBL2045CT rated at 20A, giving 5V*20A = 100W on the +5V. The label on the side claimed 25A (125W).<br />
<br />
<b>2.</b> This is the +12V fast recovery transistor, and is a F12C20C rated at 12A, giving 12V*12A = 144W on the +12V. The label claimed 18A (216W).<br />
<br />
<b>3.</b> This is the +3.3V transistor, and is a S10C40C rated at 10A, giving 3.3V*10A = 33W on the +3.3V. The label claimed 34A (112.2W).<br />
<br />
As you can see the label is a <b>complete fabrication</b>, particularly the +3.3V rating. The actual rating is less than a <i>third</i> of what the label states, and the other rails have silicon rated significantly below the label as well. It is a pure lie, in every way. The total output capability of the three main rails adds up to only 277W in real life. This on a 430W power supply.<br />
<br />
To further the joke, Gabriel Torres' 500W sample had silicon with the same ratings, meaning that the 500W version can't deliver any more power than the 430W version. You don't say. I'm curious to see one of the 180W versions, to see if it has the same silicon. For the record, Gabe's review sample blew up at 265W in his testing, which is consistent with both our findings for the ratings of the components used.<br />
<br />
<img src="http://fc04.deviantart.net/fs71/i/2010/185/c/1/LPJ2_p24_1_by_Phaedrus2401.jpg" border="0" alt="" onload="NcodeImageResizer.createOn(this);" /><br />
<br />
Here's the final stage of the secondary, filtering.<br />
<br />
<b>1.</b> This is the +12V/+5V coil. This is a group regulated design, typical of both quality and not-quality budget units. Indy regulated units would have a separate coil for the +12V and +5V. This design leads to looser regulation and slightly noisier outputs (if not correctly filtered)<br />
<br />
<b>2.</b> This is the +3.3V coil, a bit on the small side really and not very tightly wound.<br />
<br />
<b>3.</b> These are the main secondary filtering capacitors. There are five of them. Five. FIVE. The Antec EA430 I reviewed had close to <i>two dozen</i>. <b>FIVE?</b> They're all Fuhjyyu, by the way.<br />
<br />
<b>4.</b> You can see the silkscreening for additional capacitors. There are at least six missing, just replaced with junctions or nothing at all. This is a freaking crime.<br />
<br />
<b>5.</b> This is the PWM controller, an AT2005A<br />
<br />
<b>6.</b> And some ancillary stuff for the controller, at least that's mostly there.<br />
<br />
This power supply is, in Gabe's words, a bad Chinese joke. It cannot deliver even two thirds of its rated wattage, the label is a blatant lie, the build quality is horrendous with some of the worst soldering I've ever seen and many components hot glued into place, the capacitors used are horrible and prone to early failure, the design is antiquated, and many important components are simply omitted. The higher wattage version cannot deliver any more power because the components have the same rating. There is no transient filter to protect your system from surges. Ripple levels in testing of the 500W version were horrifically bad. The only protection provided is a fuse, which is laughably poorly implemented. It is bad, bad, bad, bad, bad. Avoid this garbage at all costs, as well as anything else made by Linkworld. This is simply <i>terrible</i>.<br />
<br />
I would like to thank Joecyln84 and LaoFX of Overclock.net for donating to help offset the cost of this piece of garbage. When I get the chance I'll put it back together and do a video of me smashing it to tiny bits with a sledgehammer. I'll post that here when I get to it.
 

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ugggghhhhhh<br />
<br />
have fun smashing the PSU! Post a video for us?
 

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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter #3
<div style="margin:20px; margin-top:5px; ">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px">Quote:</div>
<table cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" border="0" width="99%">
<tr>
<td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset">

<div>
Originally Posted by <strong>Mr.Pie</strong>
<a href="showthread.php?s=74c93f6f203cd8fae0e35cc41dcc73e0&p=9898960#post9898960" rel="nofollow"><img class="inlineimg" src="http://static.overclock.net//img/forum/go_quote.gif" border="0" alt="View Post" /></a>
</div>
<div style="font-style:italic">ugggghhhhhh<br />
<br />
have fun smashing the PSU! Post a video for us?</div>

</td>
</tr>
</table>
</div>Definitely. <img src="/images/smilies/smile.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Smile" class="inlineimg" />
 

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17,206 Posts
SeaSonic is screwed. <img src="/images/smilies/tongue.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Stick Out Tongue" class="inlineimg" />
 

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Premium Member
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16,520 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Marin</strong> <a href="showthread.php?s=74c93f6f203cd8fae0e35cc41dcc73e0&p=9898998#post9898998"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="http://static.overclock.net//img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">SeaSonic is screwed. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Stick Out Tongue"></div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
Yup; I hear their engineers are too busy pissing themselves with laughter to finish the new X series. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Stick Out Tongue">
 

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Registered
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Incredibly entertaining to hear you rip on this, even though I had no idea what half of that stuff was.
 

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939 veteran & 1155 fanboy
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Woah. Good info on PSUs, thanks <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Smile">. Didn't really need the review though, I wasn't ever considering buying one of these things <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">.<br><br>
Can't wait to see the big 'ol capacitors get smashed by a hammer.
 

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You're gonna smash it with a hammer...? Why not send it to OklahomaWolf for a proper toasting, or better yet, a late 4th of July fireworks show? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Stick Out Tongue"> THEN smash it with a hammer when he's done.
 

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Man with Fans
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7,746 Posts
....<br>
This is cheaper than cheap, generic stuff you find bundled with the computer case.
 

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OG
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4,061 Posts
You should take a grenade launcher or something cool to it.<br><br>
Ship them the parts back and be like, 'It broke' and link them to your post as to why it deserved a grenade or something cool
 

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Discussion Starter #11
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>caraboose</strong> <a href="showthread.php?s=74c93f6f203cd8fae0e35cc41dcc73e0&p=9899091#post9899091"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="http://static.overclock.net//img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">You should take a grenade launcher or something cool to it.<br><br>
Ship them the parts back and be like, 'It broke' and link them to your post as to why it deserved a grenade or something cool</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
... Thermite perhaps?<br><br><br>
I didn't send it to JG since A.) shipping cots B.) he's already tested a different Linkworld, C.) Gabe Torres (HardwareSecrets) already tested this Linkworld, D.) I WANT TO ****ING KILL IT. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Stick Out Tongue">
 

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Chainsaw noise far off
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6,010 Posts
Lost in a sea of junk power supplies.These things are a dime a dozen.<br><br>
It is possible the thing works,but I doubt it.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Oh, it would have worked. For a little while. Not now that I cut the main power lines inside it to remove the PCB. And the world is a better place for that. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Smile">
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Reassembled, I'm gonna go smash it tomorrow morning when there's light. I did end up with a few extra screws; two of the PCB screws, two screws for the primary heatsink, a grounding screw, and one that I don't know where it goes. Nothing that should have *too* much impact on the destruction.
 

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Originally Posted by <strong>Phaedrus2129</strong>
<a href="showthread.php?s=74c93f6f203cd8fae0e35cc41dcc73e0&p=9899382#post9899382" rel="nofollow"><img class="inlineimg" src="http://static.overclock.net//img/forum/go_quote.gif" border="0" alt="View Post" /></a>
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<div style="font-style:italic">Reassembled, I'm gonna go smash it tomorrow morning when there's light. I did end up with a few extra screws; two of the PCB screws, two screws for the primary heatsink, a grounding screw, and one that I don't know where it goes. Nothing that should have *too* much <b>impact on the normal operation of this power supply.</b></div>

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</div><img src="/images/smilies/wink.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Wink" class="inlineimg" />
 

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Discussion Starter #17
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Originally Posted by <strong>Redmist</strong>
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<div style="font-style:italic"><img src="/images/smilies/wink.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Wink" class="inlineimg" /></div>

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</div>lol <img src="/images/smilies/tongue.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Stick Out Tongue" class="inlineimg" />
 

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Nerd rage = entertaining.
 

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The box is hilariously bad.
 

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Ahh, I remember the days when I didn't know better, buying such PSUs. I was so used to those junky things I was shocked when I got a decent one, and it weighed like there was a brick in the box...<br><br>
Get an arc welder, and wire it to the main inputs... or something to explode it electrically (at night so the sparks look good) and THEN it's time for Phaedrus Pulverize!!!
 
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