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I run Linux on several of my pc's with no problem. I installed Linux Mint on a pc (old AMD) for my uncle who is computer illiterate. He really likes it but I think it has compatibility problems I'm always having to tweak it and even sometimes reinstall another version. So I gave him a laptop with mint and it works good. Now he wants me to build him a desktop. My question is...Are there certain components (brands) that I should avoid because of compatibility? Don't want to build him something and have problems again.
 

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Generally speaking most mainstream desktop hardware is going to work out of the box for Linux. I would just make sure that it has an Intel NIC. Other than that, you might want to steer clear of the Ryzen 2400g and 2200g, since this is a build that you don't want to have to mess with too much. They are awesome CPUs, but there are still some bugs that need to be worked out on the video end of the processor.
 

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Generally speaking most mainstream desktop hardware is going to work out of the box for Linux. I would just make sure that it has an Intel NIC. Other than that, you might want to steer clear of the Ryzen 2400g and 2200g, since this is a build that you don't want to have to mess with too much. They are awesome CPUs, but there are still some bugs that need to be worked out on the video end of the processor.
An Intel NIC is nice for high throughput scenarios, but to be honest onboard NICs such as the typical Realtek RTL8111 are perfectly fine (my sig. rig has one).
 

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An Intel NIC is nice for high throughput scenarios, but to be honest onboard NICs such as the typical Realtek RTL8111 are perfectly fine (my sig. rig has one).

That is true. Recently the realtek drivers have worked much better on Linux. I guess it is just something that is stuck in my brain from back when it could be pretty rough to get networking functioning on many of the realtek nics. :D
 

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That is true. Recently the realtek drivers have worked much better on Linux. I guess it is just something that is stuck in my brain from back when it could be pretty rough to get networking functioning on many of the realtek nics. :D
Don't worry, I'm just as guilty - AMD graphics drivers on Linux being a really good example. :D I've been 100% NVIDIA with my desktop machines, but the open source Radeon drivers seem to be more than good enough and easily on par (if not better than) the closed source driver. My next graphics card will be from AMD. :D

No one expects Realtek cards to match Intel or Broadcom, but they're not too bad. I just tested an FTP transfer with one and got 90MiB/s (720Mb/s), admittedly to a Core 2-based iMac from 2009 with about 54% system CPU load during the transfer. A faster target machine might see 100MiB/s, maybe. :)
 

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Ethernet has been a drop-in no-brainer for a long time in Linux. the few major incompatibilities that still exist are some WiFi chips (usually not so much the base chip as some manufacturer's implementations) and NVME drives but that's only because they are new and very expensive. That's changing and Linux right along with them..
 
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