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Programmer
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28,680 Posts
If you set it to low, you may need to set a higher volateg in the bios.
Say you want 1.3v for your CPU. With low vdroop control, you may have to set the vcore to 1.34 for example within the bios. With higher vdroop control, if you want 1.3v, you would be looking at setting the vcore to asomething like 1.31 or 1.32v.

These numbers are just give you an idea. I just use low vdroop and set a higher voltage in the bios.

By setting the vcore to 1.34 or 1.32 with higher/lower vdroop control, the CPU will still run at 1.3v

(Numbers are just examples and are not based on anything but an example)
 

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Premium Member
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13,266 Posts
you want low vdroop. Low droop= less voltage needed set. i have one of these boards, you want low vdroop.
 

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2,343 Posts
Low Vdroop = increased voltage under load.
High Vdroop = reduced voltage under load.

Low Vdroop (52%) - with my Vdroop settings set to 52% my voltage under load went from 1.35 to 1.28 and thus I received a BSOD.

High Vdroop (19%) - with my Vdroop set to 19% my voltage under load goes from 1.35 to around 1.32-1.36.

So mainly with a lower Vdroop you can preform more stable OCs, but always do a quick test run before you just ignore it just in case you huge spikes in voltage i.e. 1.425-1.45 because that can harm your CPU.

FYI if your wondering about the percentages with my motherboard I can adjust my settings by 3% increases or decreases and 0% = off for me while %100 = fully on.
 
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