Overclock.net banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
493 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My 8700K is stable at 5.1 GHz @ 1.345v and 5.0 @ 1.300v at most but possibly less (haven't tried less yet) but I'm having a major issue. My vcore, when set to adaptive, is going way higher than what I set it to. It shoots to and stays at 1.360v under load when I set it to 1.300v in the BIOS, and is going to over 1.4v when BIOS set to 1.345v. What is ignoring my voltage settings and wanting to burn-out and destroy my CPU?

For the record, I've had a 2500k, 2x 4930k, 5930k, 6850k prior to leaving HEDT line and going back to mainstream with this 8700k. I've also had 8 different motherboards between all those (I buy and sell when I can find a good deal on a higher-end board) ranging from bottom of the line to top of the line (Eg. MSI XPower and Asus Rampage Extreme).

The only variation in my BIOS vcore and true vcore underload and no load with all those other CPUs and motherboads would be minor, for example, I want 1.360v and get 1.372v under load and those were always with dynamic/adaptive vcore.

I've tried setting it to adaptive + offset with offset set to just +0.001v but no difference. Setting an offset to -0.600v would seem like begging for instability due to the vcore dropping too low when not under very heavy load.

This is crazy. It's like my PC is defective or something. I've never experienced this on any motherboard or CPU since I started overclocking when P67 / i5-2500K came out....


BIOS: using 7B48v251(Beta version) and also previous 7B48v24 (non-beta), no difference
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,392 Posts
What is your Load Line calibration set to? You can sometimes offset these spikes by altering the LLC a bit lower.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,747 Posts
I had a i5 2500k also and adjusting the voltage was fine with adaptive/dynamic. From sky lake to coffee lake I don't concern my self what i set in BIOS settings compared to what I see in windows utilities for adaptive/dynamic. I only check the minimum Vcore for stability testing for what is needed in software readings in windows then adjust the BIOS adaptive/dynamic for minimum voltage required for stability.
 

·
Overclocker
Joined
·
11,636 Posts
Major? What's major about adaptive voltage showing up in software monitors higher than what you set? It's adaptive, it adapts, it has done this on all previous Intel platforms at least as far as Haswell but probably much longer. Don't use adaptive if you don't like it, simple as that.
 

·
Facepalm
Joined
·
8,608 Posts
My 8700K is stable at 5.1 GHz @ 1.345v and 5.0 @ 1.300v at most but possibly less (haven't tried less yet) but I'm having a major issue. My vcore, when set to adaptive, is going way higher than what I set it to. It shoots to and stays at 1.360v under load when I set it to 1.300v in the BIOS, and is going to over 1.4v when BIOS set to 1.345v. What is ignoring my voltage settings and wanting to burn-out and destroy my CPU?

For the record, I've had a 2500k, 2x 4930k, 5930k, 6850k prior to leaving HEDT line and going back to mainstream with this 8700k. I've also had 8 different motherboards between all those (I buy and sell when I can find a good deal on a higher-end board) ranging from bottom of the line to top of the line (Eg. MSI XPower and Asus Rampage Extreme).

The only variation in my BIOS vcore and true vcore underload and no load with all those other CPUs and motherboads would be minor, for example, I want 1.360v and get 1.372v under load and those were always with dynamic/adaptive vcore.

I've tried setting it to adaptive + offset with offset set to just +0.001v but no difference. Setting an offset to -0.600v would seem like begging for instability due to the vcore dropping too low when not under very heavy load.

This is crazy. It's like my PC is defective or something. I've never experienced this on any motherboard or CPU since I started overclocking when P67 / i5-2500K came out....


BIOS: using 7B48v251(Beta version) and also previous 7B48v24 (non-beta), no difference
Functioning by design.
Set IA AC DC loadline to the lowest NON ZERO VALUE (could be 1, or 0.1, or 0.01, depending on your Bios, to prevent this.

IA AC DC loadline is NOT loadline calibration !!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
493 Posts
Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
What is your Load Line calibration set to? You can sometimes offset these spikes by altering the LLC a bit lower.
You may be on to something here. With all my previous CPUs, I always used the 2nd-4th most aggressive Load Line Calibration to prevent Vdroop and that would always have me around my wanted voltage during 100% load. So I did the same thing with this CPU (tried the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th most aggressive LLC settings) and all gave me insane voltage increases relative to my set voltage. What I ended up doing is using the 2nd LEAST aggressive voltage and that is now preventing my CPU from the crazy overvoltages and keeping my CPU at around my set voltage. It's weird how the LLC needs to be set to almost minimum (least aggressive) with my motherboard. Can setting such an un-aggressive LLC cause any issues?

Major? What's major about adaptive voltage showing up in software monitors higher than what you set? It's adaptive, it adapts, it has done this on all previous Intel platforms at least as far as Haswell but probably much longer. Don't use adaptive if you don't like it, simple as that.
If adaptive is supposed to "adapt" and go higher than what you set it at, then why even set a voltage in the first place, why not just set the BIOS to "adaptive" and be done with it? Obviously you're still supposed to set a voltage and it should be staying around there. The point of adaptive voltage is for the voltage to increase/decrease with frequency so that you're not, for example, pumping 1.35v into a CPU when the CPU is idling/working at 800 MHz, or 2.7 GHz, or whatever. Adaptive or not, the user is still supposed to define the CPU voltage and max frequency in the BIOS so what you say is only partially true and please go bother someone else if you're going to say things like "Don't use adaptive if you don't like it, simple as that."


Functioning by design.
Set IA AC DC loadline to the lowest NON ZERO VALUE (could be 1, or 0.1, or 0.01, depending on your Bios, to prevent this.

IA AC DC loadline is NOT loadline calibration !!
Yes, I heard of this, but I never had to do this with any other CPU or motherboard (listed in OP). I don't have, or at least can't find, those settings in my MSI Z370-A Pro motherboard. I'm guessing MSI doesn't give this option to the Z370-A Pro due to being probably the lowest-end Z370 board in their lineup.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,747 Posts
As far as I know only Gigabyte and ASUS has the IA AC DC option so that you don't have to use negative Vcore with Adaptive/offset. What is the offset your using for 5.0GHz?

Load line is a Intel, AMD specification that I leave on auto. Overclockers demanded settings to disable LL in the past now there is adjustment with LLC. LINK: https://en.wikichip.org/wiki/load-line_calibration
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,392 Posts
You may be on to something here. With all my previous CPUs, I always used the 2nd-4th most aggressive Load Line Calibration to prevent Vdroop and that would always have me around my wanted voltage during 100% load. So I did the same thing with this CPU (tried the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th most aggressive LLC settings) and all gave me insane voltage increases relative to my set voltage. What I ended up doing is using the 2nd LEAST aggressive voltage and that is now preventing my CPU from the crazy overvoltages and keeping my CPU at around my set voltage. It's weird how the LLC needs to be set to almost minimum (least aggressive) with my motherboard. Can setting such an un-aggressive LLC cause any issues?

If adaptive is supposed to "adapt" and go higher than what you set it at, then why even set a voltage in the first place, why not just set the BIOS to "adaptive" and be done with it? Obviously you're still supposed to set a voltage and it should be staying around there. The point of adaptive voltage is for the voltage to increase/decrease with frequency so that you're not, for example, pumping 1.35v into a CPU when the CPU is idling/working at 800 MHz, or 2.7 GHz, or whatever. Adaptive or not, the user is still supposed to define the CPU voltage and max frequency in the BIOS so what you say is only partially true and please go bother someone else if you're going to say things like "Don't use adaptive if you don't like it, simple as that."


Yes, I heard of this, but I never had to do this with any other CPU or motherboard (listed in OP). I don't have, or at least can't find, those settings in my MSI Z370-A Pro motherboard. I'm guessing MSI doesn't give this option to the Z370-A Pro due to being probably the lowest-end Z370 board in their lineup.
Happy that seems to have tamed your spikes. The risk of setting it too LOW (depending on mobo and bios) is that the under spike can drop too far and cause blue screening during idle. The ideal scenario is to find the LLC of your mobo that spikes the least both ways; hopefully you found that!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,747 Posts
Happy that seems to have tamed your spikes. The risk of setting it too LOW (depending on mobo and bios) is that the under spike can drop too far and cause blue screening during idle. The ideal scenario is to find the LLC of your mobo that spikes the least both ways; hopefully you found that!
That does not make sense OEM PCs use AUTO load line to Intel and AMD specifications and they all idle fine. Auto Load line helps with the spikes that can only be seen with a scope from the VRM slow reaction to clamp voltage spikes. Where folks run in to trouble is is setting negative offset then that decreases the Intel stock non turbo and idle voltage out of specification causing instability.:)
 

·
Facepalm
Joined
·
8,608 Posts
As far as I know only Gigabyte and ASUS has the IA AC DC option so that you don't have to use negative Vcore with Adaptive/offset. What is the offset your using for 5.0GHz?

Load line is a Intel, AMD specification that I leave on auto. Overclockers demanded settings to disable LL in the past now there is adjustment with LLC. LINK: https://en.wikichip.org/wiki/load-line_calibration

MSI has this option also. Maybe not on all their motherboards, but if they have it in their Kaby Lake and 6 core *LAPTOPS* (hidden of course, you have to unlock menus manually to access it), you can bet your right foot they have it in at least SOME of their desktop boards.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top