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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys, I have a question about some odd readings showing up in various programs I use (HWinfo, aida64, etc..)

Okay, so I have a new build - a MSI H81I Mini itx board, Pentium G3220, and 2GB DDR3.

When I try to look at the voltages present in whatever program Im using, they show a ridiculous voltage for the DRAM (2.160 - 2.175 volts). The funny thing is, I didn't overvolt - these are stock "auto" settings in bios.

When I changed the voltage to 1.5v in BIOS, the result is the same as setting "Auto". Since the bios included with this board lacks a realtime voltage readout, I have to use a windows based program to see it - here's some screenshots from HWinfo and Aida 64:




Okay, so I did memtest86 for about 1.5 hours. No errors.
Swapped out the memory for 4GB 1600mhz 1.5v DDR3. Same result - the board shows the voltage at 2.160 volts normally, despite setting it to 1.5 volts.
Ran memtest86 again for bout 2 hours with the 4GB stick. No errors.
this time, checked how warm the memory stick was, and it was barely 45c. barely warm to the touch.

I've also noticed the CPU core voltage does not get read properly in most of the programs. Aida shows 1.7v for the "CPU VRM" , and 0.16 volts for the core itself. However, MSI's command center utility shows a different value - under "CPU VID" which usually shows up to be around 0.8 - 1v, depending on the CPU state.

Im running Windows 7.

Can anyone tell me what's going on here ?? Is the board actually running that amount of voltage through the memory, or is it that the sensors are crappy, and aren't reporting the voltages correctly ?

blinksmiley.gif
 

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Wow. If MSI has its own monitoring software, then I recommend trying that too. This certainly is a stumper.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Here's a screenshot of MSI's Command Center and MSI's HWMonitor / Intel Extreme Tuning Utility.



What's funny about this is the BIOS / MSI-CC / MSI-IETU completely lack a realtime readout of DRAM voltage, they only have readouts of what the setting is at.

... Is MSI trying to hide a faulty sensor ??
mad.gif
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mildaine View Post

Here's a screenshot of MSI's Command Center and MSI's HWMonitor / Intel Extreme Tuning Utility.



What's funny about this is the BIOS / MSI-CC / MSI-IETU completely lack a realtime readout of DRAM voltage, they only have readouts of what the setting is at.

... Is MSI trying to hide a faulty sensor ??
mad.gif
Hmm... that's a good question. lol :)
 

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2.160V is even above the absolute maximum allowed by all the chip makers, which is 1.975V or less.

I think you'll have to take a direct measurement with a digital voltage meter, either at the chip that feeds power to the DIMM sockets (I'm guessing it's that square thing with 4 pins on one side, near the PCI-E socket) or the DIMM sockets themselves. You don't want to poke the meter into the slot but instead into the several square holes next to it, each which allows access to one of the DIMM pins. You want the pins for Vdd (51, 60, 65, 66, 75, 173, 176, 179, 182, 189, 191, 194, 197). To take measurements, power up the computer with the hard disks disconnected and the DIMMs removed.

 

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Or, you can do this: run Prime95' Custom Blend test telling it to use about 85% of your installed memory. Then, while that's running, feel the temperature of your memory by just touching it. If it's so hot that your skin would burn, then yeah, your voltage is way too high. However, if it's hot but not so hot that you'd burn yourself, then you're safe.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoCables View Post

Or, you can do this: run Prime95' Custom Blend test telling it to use about 85% of your installed memory. Then, while that's running, feel the temperature of your memory by just touching it. If it's so hot that your skin would burn, then yeah, your voltage is way too high. However, if it's hot but not so hot that you'd burn yourself, then you're safe.
lol....
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I did try HWINFO, it's just not in the screenshots. After several days of the computer running, playing video games and watching HD movies and such, there have been no problems at all. The ram barely feels warm to the touch either.

If that much voltage was going through the chip, I would think they would get quite a bit hot....
devil.gif


It's a 2GB chip, so, if it does blow, i'll look into it a little further by probing with a multimeter (I would have to find a tested method for this before attempting it)
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mildaine View Post

It's a 2GB chip, so, if it does blow, i'll look into it a little further by probing with a multimeter (I would have to find a tested method for this before attempting it)
I'd be really, really surprised if it was a 2GB chip because that's probably twice the size of any DDR3 chip available. Do you instead mean 2Gb? How many chips are on each module?

DDR2 and DDR3 DIMM sockets are fairly easy and safe to measure because they have those tiny rectangular holes next to the slots (you can seen the socket contacts in them move when you insert or remove a DIMM). But you will need something thin enough to slip into those holes, like needle-tipped meter probes, thin bare solid wire, or a needle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Metric and jedec are specified as GB and iec is GiB however only metric specifies multiples of 1000, and of course bits are specified as Gbit in all 3 standards, so I dont know what your saying about how it is twice the size of anything available. Memory is always advertised in myltiples of bytes.

I domt have probes thin enough to test them as of yet, so I will have to wait.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by larymoencurly View Post

I'd be really, really surprised if it was a 2GB chip because that's probably twice the size of any DDR3 chip available. Do you instead mean 2Gb? How many chips are on each module?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mildaine View Post

Metric and jedec are specified as GB and iec is GiB however only metric specifies multiples of 1000, and of course bits are specified as Gbit in all 3 standards, so I dont know what your saying about how it is twice the size of anything available. Memory is always advertised in myltiples of bytes.

I don't have probes thin enough to test them as of yet, so I will have to wait.
You can take some stranded wire, remove a single strand, and wrap that strand several times around the positive meter tip to get something that will fit through those tiny rectangular holes in the DIMM socket

2GB is 8x as much as 2Gb.

 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mildaine View Post

I did try HWINFO, it's just not in the screenshots. After several days of the computer running, playing video games and watching HD movies and such, there have been no problems at all. The ram barely feels warm to the touch either.

If that much voltage was going through the chip, I would think they would get quite a bit hot....
devil.gif


It's a 2GB chip, so, if it does blow, i'll look into it a little further by probing with a multimeter (I would have to find a tested method for this before attempting it)
Did you touch your memory modules while gaming? Which games were you testing? How much memory was being used?

Even so, I think a better test would be running Prime95's Blend test. The memory should feel warmer while running that. However, if it's blazing hot and feels like it would burn you, then you know that you're seeing the actual voltage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by larymoencurly View Post

You can take some stranded wire, remove a single strand, and wrap that strand several times around the positive meter tip to get something that will fit through those tiny rectangular holes in the DIMM socket

2GB is 8x as much as 2Gb.

That sounds like a good idea, i'll have to experiment with that to see how it works out.

Memory is not described in bits in terms of it's total capacity. However, individual chips on the memory itself are measured in bits. Retail computer stores and such never advertise memory to by "2 Gigabits" of memory when for sale, because that would only be 256 "Megabytes" of memory. 8 bits equals 1 byte, and 1 Gigabit equals 128 Megabytes.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mildaine
It's a 2GB chip,
Quote:
Originally Posted by larymoencurly View Post

I'd be really, really surprised if it was a 2GB chip because that's probably twice the size of any DDR3 chip available. Do you instead mean 2Gb? How many chips are on each module?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mildaine View Post

Memory is not described in bits in terms of it's total capacity. However, individual chips on the memory itself are measured in bits. Retail computer stores and such never advertise memory to by "2 Gigabits" of memory when for sale, because that would only be 256 "Megabytes" of memory. 8 bits equals 1 byte, and 1 Gigabit equals 128 Megabytes.
It depends on whether the memory is a single chip or a whole module, and it's common for individual memory chips to be described in bits in term of its total capacity because the chips are not always made in byte-wide (8 bits) word width, and Micron lists widths of 4, 8, and 16 bits Micron DDR3 DRAM catalog.

A whole module is never described as a "chip", and I don't know of any 2GB DRAM chip; the biggest available now seems to be 1GB.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by larymoencurly View Post

It depends on whether the memory is a single chip or a whole module, and it's common for individual memory chips to be described in bits in term of its total capacity because the chips are not always made in byte-wide (8 bits) word width, and Micron lists widths of 4, 8, and 16 bits Micron DDR3 DRAM catalog.

A whole module is never described as a "chip", and I don't know of any 2GB DRAM chip; the biggest available now seems to be 1GB.
okay..... so I made a terminology error. I'll correct myself here : "it's a 2GB module".
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
It would be nice to see if anyone else has this board. I am curious if anyone else is having the same problem as me
 

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It would also be nice to have my question answered. :)
 
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