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Quote:
It seems that even the Microsoft owned Rare development studio struggled for a while before accepting the notion of button-less gaming.

The revelation comes from Nick Burton, development director for Kinect at Rare, who “remember those first few weeks of us having the tech in November 2008, we were going 'but you've got to have a button!' To the extent that we built little buttons that you could hold in your hands, just to try it.â€


Source.
 

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Link works for me as well.

I don't think you need buttons on kinect, because kinect is targeting the more casual gamer who likes to just jump right in and play and is put off by steep learning curves.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Craiga35 View Post
Link works for me as well.

I don't think you need buttons on kinect, because kinect is targeting the more casual gamer who likes to just jump right in and play and is put off by steep learning curves.
Yeah, I hate having to learn how to push a button everytime I start playing a new console.
 

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Rare is right though.

Games need tactile feedback. Its not a question of innovation or change, its simply a fact. Excluding it from the gaming experience is like playing without sound or video.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by nathris View Post
Rare is right though.

Games need tactile feedback. Its not a question of innovation or change, its simply a fact. Excluding it from the gaming experience is like playing without sound or video.
This.

Something like rumble is something that enhances your experience.

Sony attempted to tell people that rumble was just "meh". People lol'd till the put rumble back in (althought they probably planned to do it from the start and the "meh" argument was just damage control).

Remove feedback from games that require precision play (driving/shooting/etc) and you've removed one of the most important factors for precision.

As I once heard a dev say, knowing that you pressed a button allows a much smoother game progression than making a gesture and waiting to see if what you did actually registers.

This is possibly why the most action packed game MS have been able to display is Kinect Adventures and even that has a serious amount of lag.
 

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Link works for me lol.
 

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They should have put 2 buttons on the thing anyway, those games that need them would then have them available. Sure, some will not need even one, but without that option you're limiting yourself to games that don't need even one button.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by GrizzleBoy View Post
This.

Something like rumble is something that enhances your experience.

Sony attempted to tell people that rumble was just "meh". People lol'd till the put rumble back in (althought they probably planned to do it from the start and the "meh" argument was just damage control).

Remove feedback from games that require precision play (driving/shooting/etc) and you've removed one of the most important factors for precision.

As I once heard a dev say, knowing that you pressed a button allows a much smoother game progression than making a gesture and waiting to see if what you did actually registers.

This is possibly why the most action packed game MS have been able to display is Kinect Adventures and even that has a serious amount of lag.
I completely agree with this. Anybody ever try to play mario kart for the wii with the wiimote? It's a straight up 1 second delay between the twist of the controller and the turning of the kart. When playing with a GC controller there is no lag.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by _02 View Post
Well that is bizarre. I tried IE, FF, Chrome, Safari. Local network, wireless network, PC, Macbook Pro.

*shrug*
Same message for me!
 

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Article is missing for me too.

Here's the whole thing for the people who can't see it:

Quote:
Microsoft's UK studio Rare originally made prototype button controllers for Kinect, as it struggled with the early concept of peripheral-free motion control.

According to Nick Burton, development director for Kinect at Rare, it wasn't until the first successful game prototypes began drawing a crowd in-house that it dawned on the team that there were multiple ways to interact without holding moulded plastic.

"I remember those first few weeks of us having the tech in November 2008, we were going 'but you've got to have a button!' To the extent that we built little buttons that you could hold in your hands, just to try it," he said in an interview with GamesIndustry.biz.

"The acid test turned out to be a couple of prototypes we worked out quickly. We weren't thinking about sports, these were just ideas we were chucking around for three or four days at a time. We had a little goal kick game that was to test accuracy of avatars and it worked well because we could place a virtual ball in front of the player. And at the same time as that, we realised that kicking doesn't involve a button, there doesn't have to be a button press.

"That was the shared moment where we realised we don't need buttons," he added. "At that point it really evolved for us. It turns out there are lot of ways to interact, it's just a case of finding the right way to do it for your product. It was interesting at that time to go from the assumption that we've got to have buttons to the realisation we don't need them."

Although it took a while for the game designers at Microsoft to throw out old conventions, Burton believes gamers will warm to Kinect much quicker, as the launch titles are built around instinctive actions.

"Once you say to somebody, 'that's you on the screen,' they realise it does what you do. If you show them a table tennis table and ball coming to them - even if it's a wireframe - they naturally move to hit it.

"It's in-built life experience. I think we've lowered the barrier because once a user sees himself on the screen having an effect in the world, it clicks. Sports is a no-brainer. You don't have to tell anyone how to play football."
 
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