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In this article we’ll discuss if defragmentation can be used as a performance test for hard disk drives. We will also see how the time it takes to perform a defragmentation procedure depends on the Native Command Queuing technology support. 16 hard disk drives participated in our test session.
http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/sto...mentation.html
 

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Yeah, but it depends how much they are defragmented. This isn't really a benchmark as some drives may be more fragmented than others, no matter what you have on them, how long the data's been there etc.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by JohnRogers View Post
Yeah, but it depends how much they are defragmented. This isn't really a benchmark as some drives may be more fragmented than others, no matter what you have on them, how long the data's been there etc.

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We used GetSmart tool to transfer this partition sector by sector to the tested HDDs. Thus, we made sure the data was absolutely identical on each HDD because the per-sector transfer maintained the original structure of files within the partition.
They are exactly the same data on every hard drive...
 

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Yeah, the testing was identical across all the hard drives. It's strange that NCQ doesn't have any effect on an application that it was in all honesty designed to make faster :\\
 

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Originally Posted by ENTERPRISE
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In any OS its always good to have optimized Hdd's

That's true, but OS X usually doesn't need defragmenting, because it doesn't fragment your data, and uses more of the disk space instead of trying to fit everything in the empty spaces
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
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Originally Posted by Sideburns
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That's true, but OS X usually doesn't need defragmenting, because it doesn't fragment your data, and uses more of the disk space instead of trying to fit everything in the empty spaces

Oh really. Thats a little fact I didnt know about OSX
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Sideburns View Post
That's true, but OS X usually doesn't need defragmenting, because it doesn't fragment your data, and uses more of the disk space instead of trying to fit everything in the empty spaces

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Originally Posted by ENTERPRISE View Post
Oh really. Thats a little fact I didnt know about OSX
Yeah that's why I asked. I asked my friend, who has the same laptop as Sideburns, what he uses to defragment his hard drive and he thought for a second then said "um... I don't know I never defragmented it..."

There isn't a defragmenter in Ubuntu either... unless I missed it...
 

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Originally Posted by thiru
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Yeah that's why I asked. I asked my friend, who has the same laptop as Sideburns, what he uses to defragment his hard drive and he thought for a second then said "um... I don't know I never defragmented it..."

There isn't a defragmenter in Ubuntu either... unless I missed it...

I'm pretty sure you can get a defragmenter for OS X, but it's basically useless...kinda like ram defragmenters...

Considering most people have 100GB or more hard drives, why don't more OSs simply use the space instead of trying to split up files to fit them in the nooks and crannies of your gigantic drive with masses of empty space? lol.

For Windows XP, I just use the one that came with it...works well enough for me.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by Sideburns
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I'm pretty sure you can get a defragmenter for OS X, but it's basically useless...kinda like ram defragmenters...

Considering most people have 100GB or more hard drives, why don't more OSs simply use the space instead of trying to split up files to fit them in the nooks and crannies of your gigantic drive with masses of empty space? lol.

For Windows XP, I just use the one that came with it...works well enough for me.

What are RAM defragmenters?? Never knew those existed...

If the files aren't split up, I imagine that it would be pretty inefficient usage of the disk since all of the little nooks and crannies do add up, especially once the HD is approaching full capacity. Or maybe, it seems to make more sense to not defragment files and once the HD is close to capacity, then we should defrag the drive.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by Burn
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Yeah, the testing was identical across all the hard drives. It's strange that NCQ doesn't have any effect on an application that it was in all honesty designed to make faster :\\

NCQ would have an effect if you were copying tons of files around while running the defragmenter. Oh, and don't copy tons of files around while defragging with the standard windows one.


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Originally Posted by Sideburns
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For Windows XP, I just use the one that came with it...works well enough for me.

Heathen! Download this immediately!

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Originally Posted by Cheetos316
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What are RAM defragmenters?? Never knew those existed...

They force all your system files to be paged to disk, so that the next time you do something, they all get to be loaded off the HD.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by Turnoz
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They are exactly the same data on every hard drive...

I think that was in response to thiru and not the article

Quote:


Originally Posted by thiru
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Yeah that's why I asked. I asked my friend, who has the same laptop as Sideburns, what he uses to defragment his hard drive and he thought for a second then said "um... I don't know I never defragmented it..."

There isn't a defragmenter in Ubuntu either... unless I missed it...

OSX (I forget its FS's name) and linux (which generally uses ext3 - although you can use whatever you want) do not fragment as much as NTFS does. They also defragment themselves automatically so that the fragmentation does not build up to the levels you see in windows systems. IIRC WinFS is supposed behave similarly - if we ever see if
 
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