Overclock.net banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
362 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all. I did a few searches and couldnt really find the answers to a few of my questions. So here I am as a newb. Please inform me!

1. why do you have to stress test a computer for 6 hours as opposed to maybe 1-2 hours?

2. I could have swore i saw somewhere that some people increase the voltage in an OC procedure. Wouldn't that increase the heat input?

3. I'm TOTALLY LOST ON OC-ING MEMORY!!!! My mem is at stock 9-9-9-24 right now. At the recommended 1.5v.

4. I saw somewhere in an OC procedure that you would have to lower the ram frequency lower than the factory settings. Does the hinder your overall performance any?

I think that all for now. Chime in any time. Still stress testing my PC. So far the most stability I can get it at 3.69 coming from 3.0. Yes, I am a 945 user. Whoa is me.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,258 Posts
1. Most stress tests aren't hard enough on the system to guarantee stability after only 1-2 hours. LinX and it's variants are an exception.

2. Yes, you sometimes need to increase the vCore to stabilize an OC. Yes, this increases the heat that the CPU outputs, hence overclockers requiring performance cooling solutions.

3. Focus on stabilizing your CPU OC, then work on RAM.

4. People tend to lower their RAM to stock (or below) to ensure that RAM stability is not affecting stability tests. Once stable CPU OC is achieved, RAM can be OCed (as stated above).

And it's 'woe' not 'woah'.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,339 Posts
No need to be sorry for asking questions!
thumb.gif


1) Depending on the stress test program, it takes at least that long to run through the different tests and stress the components fully. A short test may miss sections of memory, etc.

2) Yes, it generally will. Luckily, that is why most people opt for an aftermarket heatisnk and fans or watercooling.

3) I'll be honest, I have no idea either.
tongue.gif
I usually leave my RAM stock.

4) Someone else would be able to answer this better.

I loved my 945. I'll see if I can find my overclocking thread...

edit: Here you go: http://www.overclock.net/amd-cpus/580555-my-phenom-ii-x4-945-125w.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,350 Posts
1. It can take up to 24 hrs for an unstable CPU to crash. Stressing overnight is necessary to ensure it is 100% stable.
2. Voltage......I'll do my best to explain. An OC becomes unstable when the transistors in the CPU cannot say YES/NO (0 or 1) as fast as the current clock speed requires. Adding voltage 'speeds up' the transistors and, if you are successful, they can now keep up with the clock speed once again. Voltage AND frequency affect heat.
3. OC'ing a CPU requires increasing the mutliplier or the FSB speed. Some CPU's have locked multis and the only way to OC is to increase the FSB. However the FSB controls the memory speed too. Sometimes the memory will become unstable, but the CPU still has some potential, this is when you lower the memory multiplier so you can keep upping the FSB.

Hope that helped.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
362 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Quote:


Originally Posted by MCBrown.CA
View Post

1. Most stress tests aren't hard enough on the system to guarantee stability after only 1-2 hours. LinX and it's variants are an exception.

2. Yes, you sometimes need to increase the vCore to stabilize an OC. Yes, this increases the heat that the CPU outputs, hence overclockers requiring performance cooling solutions.

3. Focus on stabilizing your CPU OC, then work on RAM.

4. People tend to lower their RAM to stock (or below) to ensure that RAM stability is not affecting stability tests. Once stable CPU OC is achieved, RAM can be OCed (as stated above).

And it's 'woe' not 'woah'.


1. Well, I'm not too worried about the linux side of things. More worried about windows XP as thats what I do my gaming on.

2. Sucks that I don't have performance cooling. The CPU cooling unit I had got good reviews so I thought I could at least get up to 3.7something with it.

And OH, sorry about thw woah. lol. Thanks for the info!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,258 Posts
Quote:


Originally Posted by CP2
View Post

1. Well, I'm not too worried about the linux side of things. More worried about windows XP as thats what I do my gaming on.

2. Sucks that I don't have performance cooling. The CPU cooling unit I had got good reviews so I thought I could at least get up to 3.7something with it.

And OH, sorry about thw woah. lol. Thanks for the info!

LinX (not to be confused with Linux) is a Windows stress testing application that pushes your CPU way harder than Prime95 or OCCT.

At least you have aftermarket cooling. It is definitely superior to the heatsink assembly included with your processor!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
Quote:


Originally Posted by CP2
View Post

1. Well, I'm not too worried about the linux side of things. More worried about windows XP as thats what I do my gaming on.

2. Sucks that I don't have performance cooling. The CPU cooling unit I had got good reviews so I thought I could at least get up to 3.7something with it.

And OH, sorry about thw woah. lol. Thanks for the info!

He said LinX, not Linux. LinX is a stress test tool.

EDIT: Beaten by above
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top