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My claws fix anything
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3,246 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So, I thought that I would do something that I've never heard of anyone ever doing before... lapping, a stock heatsink, and adding a high CFM fan on to complete the deal. The reason that I did this, is mostly because I bought my current rig with an emphasis on being cheap and i just cant justify spending $40 on a cooler right now... plus i had fun, which is really what it comes down to.

I used parts and materials that I had laying around to do it all. I used a SilverStone FM81 fan (92mm fan in a 80mm fan body, 78cfm), a 2x4 and a some wet/dry sandpaper (finest I had was 600 grit, but it was WAY worn out)

I'll spare you all the details, but after all of the drilling, sanding and lapping were over, I got this. I actually think that it kinda looks cool on the inside (the wood grain darkened when i used an air dremmel with a sander on it, creating a swirl effect). The hardest part by FAR was trying to get the bottom "machined" right so that it would attach to the factory heatsink just like the OEM fan.

More important than the fact that I got it to go together, is that when i had it back on my computer, I saw an immediate temp decrease... even at the lowest fan speed (1900rpm). I saw an even bigger improvement when i spooled the fan up to full speed (3800rpm). Here's what I got.

ambient is 23-24c

Stock: Idle 28c, Load 50c*

1900rpm: Idle 26c, load 48c

3800rpm: Idle 24c, Load 43c

* with the stock fan, the cpu would start to throttle back, trying to get the temps back to 50c

Obviously this isn't the best cooling setup, but its better than what I had (plus it was free), and once the AS5 has time to cure, it should go down even more. So just in case any of you have been wondering " I wonder if i could lap my stock HSF?"... the answer is yes, yes you can, and you can see a pretty decent results from it too.



 

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Nicely done. I like to see people experiment with the stock parts to keep costs down. These days, with everything being so expensive, you have to cut costs where you can! Rep+
 

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My claws fix anything
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3,246 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks.... I think that working on stuff yourself is what OCin (or hot rodding... love the nova btw) is all about, you get way more out of the experience than just owning stuff. Now my next project... homemade custom case.
 

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My claws fix anything
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Discussion Starter #5
Whoops, I forgot to take a picture from that angle (showing the bottom).

The stock fan is attached by 4 clips that catch on a lip that is about 1/8th on an inch tall that runs around the base of the fan. So all I had to do was cut a replica of the fan out of the bottom of the 2x4 (so, a 70mmx70mm square that was now raised above the rest of the wood) and then cut the groves on two sides and drill some holes.

Its pretty complicated sounding, but I'll post some more pics this week or so (I'm building the hardwood case this week, so i'll be pulling everything apart anyway). The cool thing is that the fan and adapter clip on and off just like the stock fan, so i can change it back any time i want.

EDIT:
I used a radial arm saw to do all of the cuts.
 

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Superbly done!
 

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Super Moderator
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Looks Great


Thanks for sharing
 

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My claws fix anything
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3,246 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Corry, what kind of temp difference did you get after you added the tornado? Those things pushed out a ton of air (they were the scythe ultra kaze 3000 of their day), so I just wonder how much it helped.... especially on that heatpiped cooler.
 

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My claws fix anything
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3,246 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Ok, time for that update that I promised a while back.

I'm finally building my custom case, and I then actually had a reason to open everything back up, and get some better pictures for you all.

As you can see, the 2x4 was "machined" down to the same size as the stock fan, and then those grooves were cut into the sides where the clips could attach it. Now I can take on and off this fan, and replace it with the stock one whenever I like, because they both just clip on.



 

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OG Overclocker
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875 Posts
Nice work!

I did the same sort of thing to a stock intel copper core heatsink with zip ties and an old socket A Thermaltake Volcano12 fan. I didn't lap it yet, it's got cheap thermal paste, and it still keeps my celeron Prescott @ 3.7 1.5 Vcore at 49 deg C in prime95! As an added bonus, since the thermaltake fan was insanely loud at full tilt (5500 rpm!), I sanded all the blades, edges, and housing surfaces with 1000 grit sandpaper and it is quite a bit quieter.

Great way to save a few bucks! It works so well, I'm postponing plans to secure a good cooler for awhile.
 

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Cool man,nicely done i like it a lot i wish i was a good modder like you,but i´m not lol.Rep+
 

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My claws fix anything
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3,246 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Thanks man, its been fun trying to learn this stuff. Its been one of those "I think I know how to do that" things untill now, when I decided that I should go from "thinking" to "doing". Its kinda scary at first, but just like OCin, you get comfortable with it,and start having fun.

Heres a link to the thread for my case that I mentioned here.

http://www.overclock.net/amd-build-l...ml#post4432158

Enjoy!
 

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Hell, I was forced to do some "creative thinking" when I was building my roomate's comp. I got the 939 stock heat pipe cooler that came with my Opty, and threw it on the 3200+. Problem was, the board only had a three pin fan header, and there was a cap right next to it, preventing the 4pin PWM connector from fitting.
Ordered a Scythe 80mm medium speed (I think), and zip-tied it on there.
Haven't tested it really, as it isn't my computer, and I know it will work fine for...well..as long as it needs to.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Oscuro View Post
Problem was, the board only had a three pin fan header, and there was a cap right next to it, preventing the 4pin PWM connector from fitting.
It's just plastic, a pair of wire cutters would have done the trick. I once modded a floppy power connector into a 3 pin connector that way.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by logan View Post
Ok, time for that update that I promised a while back.

I'm finally building my custom case, and I then actually had a reason to open everything back up, and get some better pictures for you all.

As you can see, the 2x4 was "machined" down to the same size as the stock fan, and then those grooves were cut into the sides where the clips could attach it. Now I can take on and off this fan, and replace it with the stock one whenever I like, because they both just clip on.
Looks good Thanks
 
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