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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,

Is there such a thing as motherboard binning, for memory overclocking?

For example, if I get 5 Asus Z590 Apexes and test the same DJR kit on all of them. Maybe the best one will do 6000 MHz stable, and the worst one will do 5500 MHz stable? (With a good CPU)

Or a kit of 4800 CL17 B-die, and maybe the best board will do 5066 stable and the worst board will do 4900.
 

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Yes, but I don't think it's as meaningful on Z590 as it is on Z690 DDR5.
 

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Not so much binning, just normal manufacturing variation.
 

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Iconoclast
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Not so much binning, just normal manufacturing variation.
OP isn't referring to manufacturer binning, but end-user binning.

Without manufacturing variation, binning isn't possible.
 

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OP isn't referring to manufacturer binning, but end-user binning.
Oh. Well that is impractical in the extreme. The differences are going to be much smaller than the differences between binned CPUs because the complexity of the silicon is much less in a motherboard among other things. The differences/variations within a particular model of motherboard will be so small that the amount of testing required to tease out those differences will be huge, therefore impractical.

Furthermore, since you can likely get much bigger gains by going to another manufacturer within the same chipset, or even to a different model from the same manufacturer, then there really isn't any point.

Maybe for the very top tier of motherboards from each manufacturer it could make a little sense, but for anything lower totally not worth it.
 

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Iconoclast
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Oh. Well that is impractical in the extreme. The differences are going to be much smaller than the differences between binned CPUs because the complexity of the silicon is much less in a motherboard among other things. The differences/variations within a particular model of motherboard will be so small that the amount of testing required to tease out those differences will be huge, therefore impractical.

Furthermore, since you can likely get much bigger gains by going to another manufacturer within the same chipset, or even to a different model from the same manufacturer, then there really isn't any point.

Maybe for the very top tier of motherboards from each manufacturer it could make a little sense, but for anything lower totally not worth it.
The differences in the chipset generally isn't whats being binned for. Chipset has almost zero impact on anything related to memory.

The biggest variances will be in PCB, solder, perhaps VRM quality. There are dozens of discrete ICs in the VRM feeding the CPU socket and DIMM slots, hundred of traces, thousands of solder joints, and a few square meters of copper layers; a defect anywhere could have an impact on signaling or shielding. At the high-end of memory clocks that a board can handle, board-to-board variance can be non-trivial.
 
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The differences in the chipset generally isn't whats being binned for. Chipset has almost zero impact on anything related to memory.
I know that, I just meant there's no point comparing a Z390 against a Z690 because they are so different. Any end-user binning would need to be on a per-chipset basis.
 

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Iconoclast
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I know that, I just meant there's no point comparing a Z390 against a Z690 because they are so different. Any end-user binning would need to be on a per-chipset basis.
It's typically on a per board model/SKU basis. Someone might buy fifteen ASUS ROG Strix Z690-I Gaming Wifi boards and test them all with the same CPU and DIMM(s).

That said, nothing keeps one from testing memory across very different boards the same way, as long as the board supports the other hardware being used. Eventually, you wind up with whatever specific sample does best for whatever one is binning for.
 

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Back in ye olden time we binned boards a lot because of BCLK clock holes on x58 (and especially SR-2) as an example or prior to that the memory controller was on the board not the CPU so that had a huge impact as well.

Boards seem better built overall with much better components and QC than those times as well.
 

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Someone might buy fifteen ASUS ROG Strix Z690-I Gaming Wifi boards and test them all with the same CPU and DIMM(s)
But anyone with the spare cash for 15(!) ROG Strix boards can easily afford a ROG Maximus extreme, which will be way better than the best binned Strix board.

If you're going to buy a dozen Maximus boards and test them to find the best, well that is potentially worth the time and effort. Doing it for the Strix when you could just buy a Maximus, why? Complete waste of time and effort. That's was my original point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
But anyone with the spare cash for 15(!) ROG Strix boards can easily afford a ROG Maximus extreme, which will be way better than the best binned Strix board.

If you're going to buy a dozen Maximus boards and test them to find the best, well that is potentially worth the time and effort. Doing it for the Strix when you could just buy a Maximus, why? Complete waste of time and effort. That's was my original point.
The Z690-I is actually better than the Extreme for memory overclocking because it has 2 DIMM slots. Only the Apex may be better, I think.

Buildzoid said that the audience for 1000+ dollar motherboards has a hard time enabling XMP.

But yes, it's not worth binning a motherboard that isn't the best model already.
 

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Iconoclast
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But anyone with the spare cash for 15(!) ROG Strix boards can easily afford a ROG Maximus extreme, which will be way better than the best binned Strix board.
I don't have any personal experience with these specific boards, but in general, the best quad DIMM boards are worse than upper mid-range dual-DIMM boards when it comes to memory overclocking. Often there are ~200 dollar ITX or mATX boards that will best flagship boards of two or three times the cost.

Regardless, one binning boards for maximum memory overclocking potential, who is buying new boards (rather than just sorting whatever is on hand), would choose the best board model, then sort for the best sample of that model, to have the best chances at maximum OC.
 

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There's really no point to binning motherboards due to how their prices have vastly increased compared to the past. RAM and CPU binning is much more meaningful.

It was only more pronounced this generation as most people failed to go above 7,000-7,200 MHz on Z690, even though people like the guy binning 12900K's at Igor's Lab got an engineering sample Apex directly from ASUS which could run up to 8,000 MHz just fine.

Unless you are a hardcore competitive overclocker or have access to prebinned boards from the very makers themselves (sponsored or working for the company), it's really pointless to bother.
 
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