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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
http://www.techpowerup.com/gpuz/n7nrx/

Using an ASUS ENGTX580.
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1. What is best for stability testing? Want to do this right.

2. Would really like to go higher but not sure what and how. I already get artifacts galore when I try to up the memory clock 2500 or 25% over base.

3. Do you think I can get the core clock to 1000???

Again, don't want to do anything till I can do some stability testing of current settings first.

Thanks all.
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What program are you using to overclock(to help people trying to help you)?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I am using MS Afterburner 2.2.0 Beta 8
Just crashed and burned with the core clock at 1002. Set it back to 976.

Core Voltage: 1138
Core clock: 976
Shader: 1956
mem clcok 2404 / 1202 Strange, GPU-Z shows 1202 vs MSI showing double that.
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I would stick to OCing one variable at a time so that if/when something goes wrong you will know what it is, and seeing as core speed is much more important that memory speed for your card I would make that one variable the core speed first. So return your memory speed to it's stock default speed, and only work on your core. I don't know what you've been using for stability but I don't expect you to be stable any higher than about 950Mhz with that voltage so I would knock your core down a fair amount as well before you resume testing, probably to 900Mhz to save time and headaches. For stability testing I like Unigine heaven for between 15-45 minutes, multiple consecutive hours of the most stressful games you own (such as Crysis), and a few runs of 3DMark11 in that order of my preference. For Unigine I would run it about 15 minutes in between any incremental increases you make, so for example start at 900Mhz, run Unigine 15 minutes, then go to 910Mhz and repeat. In Unigine the most common artifact I have experienced are rays of colored light, almost like glare from the sun but in many different colors and independent of the sun. Other signs of instability would be Unigine or your drivers just crashing, your clock speeds lowering down to 405Mhz and getting stuck there, or just about anything acting in a way that you know it shouldn't regarding Unigine or your games.

Your memory clock is displaying correctly in both MSI and GPU-z, also 4808Mhz would be yet another correct way of displaying your current memory clock. That's because your GDDR5 (which stands for graphics dual data rate 5) memory is actually quad data rate. GDDR5 is double the data rate of DDR3 unless I'm mistaken, so depending on how each program wants to read it it could be 1202Mhz quad data rate, 2404Mhz dual data rate, or 4808Mhz effective data rate, which is the speed it's actually running at in the end. May be a bit confusing but basically just know that they are both right, but you don't want to worry about it anyway because you want to leave your memory at stock speeds until you are positive that your core is stable, then and only then can you move on to the memory OC if you even want to bother with it.

As I mentioned the memory speed is much less important than the core speed and also your card also uses ECC GDDR5 which is error correcting code. This means that your memory will attempt to fix it's own mistakes when it is running at an unstable OC. This will appear to remain stable but will actually decrease performance as your memory is bogged down by trying to fix it's own mistakes, so if you want to bother with the memory OC you'd have to get a performance baseline of it as stock speeds using a benchmark (or ideally a few benchmarks) and only OC the memory as far as performance continues increasing. This is the only way you can be assured that your ECC GDDR5 is actually stable. Quite a hassle IMO for very limited gains, that's why I don't bother with it myself and recommend others just focus on the core.
 
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