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Okay, I'm a little confused about the whole RAM:FSB relationship.

I've got 667mhz (PC-5300) DDR2 memory running in my system. Say I run my FSB at 250x4=1000mhz, my ram will only run at 1000mhz right?

But my RAM has a maximum of 1334mhz right? (667x2). Would I be wasting that 334mhz I'm not using and just got PC5400?

Should a person choose their ram based on how high they plan to run their FSB? Say I want to run a stock FSB of 800, their's no point to buy anything higher than PC3200 right? If I want to overclock and not run a divider, then I should get higher freq. ram?

I know this is basic, but I'm looking for clarification.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by John600rr

Okay, I'm a little confused about the whole RAM:FSB relationship.

I've got 667mhz (PC-5300) DDR2 memory running in my system. Say I run my FSB at 250x4=1000mhz, my ram will only run at 1000mhz right?

But my RAM has a maximum of 1334mhz right? (667x2). Would I be wasting that 334mhz I'm not using and just got PC5400?

Should a person choose their ram based on how high they plan to run their FSB? Say I want to run a stock FSB of 800, their's no point to buy anything higher than PC3200 right? If I want to overclock and not run a divider, then I should get higher freq. ram?

I know this is basic, but I'm looking for clarification.



You're obviously not quite clear on memory. DDR actually stands for double data rate. So 667MHz is the effective clock speed of the memory. I'm not sure exactly with DDR2, but I think that your memory will only go to 767MHz effective.
 

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Your RAM is good for 667mhz.

No... DDR does stand for double data rate BUT if you run your FSB at 250 your PROCESSOR gets quad pumped up to 1000fsb... your RAM only get double pumped because it's double data rate and would run at 500mhz. You need to run a divider in favor of your RAM such as 6:5(250 x 6/5 x 2=600mhz) or even 3:2 (250 x 3/2 x 2 = 750mhz) to get close to or OC your memory speeds. You might have to loosen your timings on your memory and sacrifice a little efficiency for more frequency (i.e. increasing the in-favor-of-ram divider) but it'll be worth the extra bandwidth on these Intel systems.
 
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