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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I recently upgraded my server's i3-2120 to a Xeon E3 1240V2 from eBay. The result is 80C at load on the i3's stock cooler. Clearly, a cooler meant for dual core processor is not going to cut it. Leaning towards something like this: https://www.amazon.com/Cooler-Maste...522536070&sr=8-3&keywords=Cooler+Master+Hyper

Requirements:
- Socket 1155
- Semi-Low profile
- Does not require backplate/motherboard removal.

Any suggestions?
 

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The i3-2120 has a TDP of 65 watts.
The Xeon E3 1240V2 has a TDP of 69 watts.

Whatever cooler works for one will work for the other.

Have you tried reapplying the thermal paste?
 

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Yeah, but the i3 won't usually be dissipating that much heat, that 65w TDP value is most probably a conservative number, it'll probably top out at 45-50w. I bet that the i3 stock cooler is a basic all-aluminium affair, whereas the stock cooler for a Xeon 4C/8T like that would most likely have at least a copper core, as it's basically a slightly lower clocked i7-3770K.

Murlocke: that cooler seems like a good budget choice, did you choose it because of price or because of space limitations? You mention "Semi-Low profile", and I can see that that cooler is not very deep, but otherwise it's just as tall as, if not taller, than other well known coolers like the Arctic Freezer 7 PRO, so the question is, what exact space limitations do you have?
 

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No, a CPU will never use more than it's TDP unless it's overclocked.
 

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Correct, well, sort of, some products do go over their rated TDP by some margin because the QA wasn't that good, but anyway, what statement are you negating?
 

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That the stock cooler from an i3-2120 (TDP 65 watts) won't handle the 69 watts from a Xeon E3 1240V2.

You're worrying about 4 watts!
 

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That the stock cooler from an i3-2120 (TDP 65 watts) won't handle the 69 watts from a Xeon E3 1240V2.

You're worrying about 4 watts!

I'm not and that's not even close to what I said. What I said is that the Core i3's real TDP is way lower than 65w and thus the stock cooler it comes with will perform reasonably, which is not the case when paired with the 4C/8T Xeon.

The reason I'm saying that the i3's real TDP is not 65w but much lower, in the range of 45-50w, is because this isn't the first time I've seen this play out, it was the same in the Core 2 Duo / Quad days.

For comparison against the i7-2600K, which has a 95w TDP, the i3 is less than half of it, so unless you got the absolute worst i3, its real TDP will not be 65w, it will be lower. It's 2C/4T vs 4C/8T; the i3's base clock is 100 Mhz lower and has no Turbo Boost; the L3 cache is less than half, at 3 MB vs 8 MB and the iGPU has half the units, HD Graphics 2000 vs HD Graphics 3000 and with a 200 Mhz lower max GPU speed.

In any case, it doesn't matter, Murlocke said that the Xeon got up to 80º C at load with the i3's cooler and while that is probably within spec, it's not a good long term proposal, hence his question.
 

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Intel and AMD are very specific on cooler specs. The have to be designed to handle the specified TDP at least. I've read the specs for both.
If a CPU used less watts than specified it would be binned to a higher lever CPU because it could handle higher voltages (and run faster) and e sold for more $$$. That's why they bin them!
 

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That's all fine (not really, see below), but the important thing is that the OP said that the CPU hit 80ºC at load. That might be just below the throttling point and within spec according to Intel, but we all know that such a high temperature is not desirable in the long-term.

Anyway, a CPU would only be binned higher if the market conditions dictated that and that is not always the case. If AMD didn't have anything to counter a hypothetically much higher clocked i3, then Intel would not release such a CPU. They would have the reserve TDP to do it, but they wouldn't. And the fact is, they only released an i3 clocked 100 Mhz higher than the i3-2120 later in the year because AMD wasn't competing back then.

Edit: And that has to do with the fact that around the Pentium D times (2005) Intel switched products to broad TDP categories, such as 35w, 65w, 95, 130w, etc. The last time Intel had specific TDPs for each CPU model was back in the Pentium 4 Prescott days, and as such, a CPU with a 65w TDP may not necessarily dissipate 65w, it just means that CPUs in that category will dissipate up to 65w and more than the preceding category, 45w at the time of SB.

Also, 32nm Sandy Bridge was made on a mature manufacturing process; Intel started making 32nm CPUs a full year before with the first gen Core i3-500 series, i5-600 series and also the x58 hexacore 980X, so by the time Sandy Bridge was released they had the tech matured.


Finally, this is what I was talking about in the beginning: Socket 1155 Core i3 CPUs were usually bundled with an all-aluminium heatsink, whereas Intel has a copper core one with ~59% more heatsink mass for i5's and above:

https://www.anandtech.com/show/10500/stock-cooler-roundup-intel-amd-vs-evo-212/3

The E97378-001 and the E97379-001 look almost identical and their ID numbers are very close, but major differences can be discerned when the coolers are turned upside down. Aside from the E97378 having a copper core, the E97379 has significantly lower mass and straight fins, hinting the use of a more powerful fan. Bent pins cause significant turbulence at high airflows and unnecessarily increase the cooler’s noise output.


 

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