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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, im doing a desk pc build and i want to save as much money as possible, is there anyway i can cut my motherboard tray out of my old case with no dremel? If you have any suggestions please comment! Also check out my build log
 

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There are ways, but nothing that is going to be cheaper or easier then a dremel.
You could use a plasma cutter, but that is fairly costly.

The only thing that might be able to be done is to unrivet the tray and remove it.
Rivets can be removed using a drill.

However that option is dependent on how the case is designed.
 

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You won't like my suggestion but you really should go ahead and get a Dremel and then take the time to learn how to properly use it. You might be able drill out the rivets holding the tray into the case but the tray will most likely need trimming and a Dremel with a cutoff wheel will be the best tool for that.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Quote:
Originally Posted by thrasherht View Post

There are ways, but nothing that is going to be cheaper or easier then a dremel.
You could use a plasma cutter, but that is fairly costly.

The only thing that might be able to be done is to unrivet the tray and remove it.
Rivets can be removed using a drill.

However that option is dependent on how the case is designed.
Hello, the case I'm using is the antec 300,it has nothing fancy in it and is a basic cheap case. If I had a drill would I be able to drill the rivets and unscrew it?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lady Fitzgerald View Post

You won't like my suggestion but you really should go ahead and get a Dremel and then take the time to learn how to properly use it. You might be able drill out the rivets holding the tray into the case but the tray will most likely need trimming and a Dremel with a cutoff wheel will be the best tool for that.
If I buy a cheap one will it be able do do the job? As in only to cut the tray out because the reason I don't want to buy a dremel is because it's expensive to me (a student) and most likely I won't ever use it again?
frown.gif
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TrYzRAID View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lady Fitzgerald View Post

You won't like my suggestion but you really should go ahead and get a Dremel and then take the time to learn how to properly use it. You might be able drill out the rivets holding the tray into the case but the tray will most likely need trimming and a Dremel with a cutoff wheel will be the best tool for that.
If I buy a cheap one will it be able do do the job? As in only to cut the tray out because the reason I don't want to buy a dremel is because it's expensive to me (a student) and most likely I won't ever use it again?
frown.gif
You can afford to build a computer but can't afford proper tools? Then you would be better off buying a ready made case. Mayhap find a used computer in a thrift shop and use its case.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I said I don't see the point in paying like almost £50 for a dremel when I won't use it again? And I have a case... But like title says want to know if there are any other ways of extracting the motherboard tray without a dremel.if worst comes to it I will buy a cheap model but if I can save money in an already expensive project (to me) then why not?
 

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You have a few options. But they all require tools of some sort.

You can drill out the rivets hold the case together and it should fall apart once you have gotten them all. You may want to look up some guides on doing this

Pros to this way: reversible, non destructive, just need a drill and drill bit. To undo what you've done you just need some pop rivets and a pop rivet gun.

Other options are going to be destructive in nature and require cutting tools. Be it a rotatory tool(dremel) with a cutting wheel, some form of saw (reciprocating, hand saw, jog saw, etc) or snips of some sort. You could get into the fancy stuff like plasma and cnc so on but those are out the realm of hand tools and why you have access to those I assume you have the basics already covered. The problem with cutting tools is they are destructive and you won't ever put back together the way it was without an advanced set of skills.

If you want to salvage just the tray I would suggest getting a drill, assorted drill bits, a pop rivet gun and some pop rivets. They are the bare essentials for dismantling a case in my opinion.

I wish you the best of luck with your project and a late welcome to the community and modding.
 

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I like using what is called a nibbler. It is slow but works great and its cheap.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TrYzRAID View Post

I said I don't see the point in paying like almost £50 for a dremel when I won't use it again? And I have a case... But like title says want to know if there are any other ways of extracting the motherboard tray without a dremel.if worst comes to it I will buy a cheap model but if I can save money in an already expensive project (to me) then why not?
Like I already said, you could drill out the rivets holding the tray in place but you would still need to do some trimming and a Dremel with a cutoff wheel would be the most practical tool for the job.

I still feel if you can't comfortably afford the tools (or aren't willing to spend the money; nothing wrong with either, I've been there, done that, and didn't get the tee shirt because I couldn't afford it either), you would be better off just using an existing case and spending your money on better components, if possible. I can understand the reluctance to spend money on a tool that you may never use again but, in my experience, that rarely is what happens.

I've bought tools for projects that I though I would never use again, then found out I could use them again. I might have gotten subsequent jobs done with the tools I bought but the tools made the job much easier and I was able to do a better job. I bought a little $100 Ryobi bandsaw about 15 years ago for what I though would be a one-off project and mounted it temporarily on a portable work bench. It's still mounted there and still gets used about once a month. Could I have gotten by without it once that first project was done? Probably, but I would have wasted a lot more time and wouldn't have done as good of a job.

The same is true of the Dremels I have owned. I don't use mine very often but, when I did, they beat the holy, hairy snot out of anything else I had. I don't consider tools to be an expense; to me, they are an investment. I don't buy my tools just because they look shiny or I like new toys (ok, I love new toys but that's not why I buy them); I buy a new tool only when I need one for a job I'm doing, such as the 12' fish rod set I bought two weeks ago when I was routing Ethernet cables from one side of my home to the other (my trusty fish tape just didn't cut the mustard for that project). I have no idea when I'll ever use them again but I guarantee I will use them again several times before I die (keep in mind I'm a flatulent geriatric not all that far from the grave).
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Quote:
Originally Posted by animal0307 View Post

You have a few options. But they all require tools of some sort.

You can drill out the rivets hold the case together and it should fall apart once you have gotten them all. You may want to look up some guides on doing this
Pros to this way: reversible, non destructive, just need a drill and drill bit. To undo what you've done you just need some pop rivets and a pop rivet gun.

Other options are going to be destructive in nature and require cutting tools. Be it a rotatory tool(dremel) with a cutting wheel, some form of saw (reciprocating, hand saw, jog saw, etc) or snips of some sort. You could get into the fancy stuff like plasma and cnc so on but those are out the realm of hand tools and why you have access to those I assume you have the basics already covered. The problem with cutting tools is they are destructive and you won't ever put back together the way it was without an advanced set of skills.

If you want to salvage just the tray I would suggest getting a drill, assorted drill bits, a pop rivet gun and some pop rivets. They are the bare essentials for dismantling a case in my opinion.

I wish you the best of luck with your project and a late welcome to the community and modding.
Thank you very much for advice and welcome! I didn't plan on keeping the case, I just need a way of getting the motherboard tray out in decent condition (preferably without a rotary tool) the drill method seems to be the best method I've heard so far, I have a ton of old bits so don't mind if they break.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ragsters View Post

I like using what is called a nibbler. It is slow but works great and its cheap.
I agree nibblers are slow, painfully slow, but in certain situations, they can't be beat (I have two of them, if you don't count the electric one used for cutting out large pieces of sheep metal). In this case, the kerf they make may not make them suitable for the job.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ragsters View Post

I like using what is called a nibbler. It is slow but works great and its cheap.
I take it a nibbler is some kind of metal cutting scissors??
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lady Fitzgerald View Post

Like I already said, you could drill out the rivets holding the tray in place but you would still need to do some trimming and a Dremel with a cutoff wheel would be the most practical tool for the job.

I still feel if you can't comfortably afford the tools (or aren't willing to spend the money; nothing wrong with either, I've been there, done that, and didn't get the tee shirt because I couldn't afford it either), you would be better off just using an existing case and spending your money on better components, if possible. I can understand the reluctance to spend money on a tool that you may never use again but, in my experience, that rarely is what happens.

I've bought tools for projects that I though I would never use again, then found out I could use them again. I might have gotten subsequent jobs done with the tools I bought but the tools made the job much easier and I was able to do a better job. I bought a little $100 Ryobi bandsaw about 15 years ago for what I though would be a one-off project and mounted it temporarily on a portable work bench. It's still mounted there and still gets used about once a month. Could I have gotten by without it once that first project was done? Probably, but I would have wasted a lot more time and wouldn't have done as good of a job.

The same is true of the Dremels I have owned. I don't use mine very often but, when I did, they beat the holy, hairy snot out of anything else I had. I don't consider tools to be an expense; to me, they are an investment. I don't buy my tools just because they look shiny or I like new toys (ok, I love new toys but that's not why I buy them); I buy a new tool only when I need one for a job I'm doing, such as the 12' fish rod set I bought two weeks ago when I was routing Ethernet cables from one side of my home to the other (my trusty fish tape just didn't cut the mustard for that project). I have no idea when I'll ever use them again but I guarantee I will use them again several times before I die (keep in mind I'm a flatulent geriatric not all that far from the grave).
Tbh you're right. I need to stop being cheap If want to build my desk as good as possible
frown.gif
I will most likely have to invest in a rotary tool if I don't want to cut my fingers off with equipment I'm not good with.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TrYzRAID View Post

...Tbh you're right. I need to stop being cheap If want to build my desk as good as possible
frown.gif
I will most likely have to invest in a rotary tool if I don't want to cut my fingers off with equipment I'm not good with.
Keep in mind you don't have to buy the most expensive and complete kit out there. You can also buy just a basic set or even just the tool alone, a cutoff disk mandrel, and some cutoff disks, then add on bits, etc. as you need them. You may even wind up saving money in the long run because you won't be paying for bits and accessories you will never use.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lady Fitzgerald View Post

Keep in mind you don't have to buy the most expensive and complete kit out there. You can also buy just a basic set or even just the tool alone, a cutoff disk mandrel, and some cutoff disks, then add on bits, etc. as you need them. You may even wind up saving money in the long run because you won't be paying for bits and accessories you will never use.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cake_man View Post

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Dremel-3000-1-5-240-Volt-Bronze-Kit-Rotary-Multi-Tool-5-Accs-Shaping-Platform-/310392326676?hash=item4844d30a14:g:qfEAAOSwoudW9Amz

Cheapest price I could find for UK

I once de-rivited and re-rivited a case , it was a god damn nightmare! I should have bought one of these my self
smile.gif
Thanks for the link! That's a great deal tvh compared to Amazon which isbin the high 40's
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lady Fitzgerald View Post

Keep in mind you don't have to buy the most expensive and complete kit out there. You can also buy just a basic set or even just the tool alone, a cutoff disk mandrel, and some cutoff disks, then add on bits, etc. as you need them. You may even wind up saving money in the long run because you won't be paying for bits and accessories you will never use.
I think I've been sold! I'm going to get a one that's good quality but cheap with only the cutting bit as that's all a need ATM
biggrin.gif
thanks guys!!
 

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Check here for instructions on how to use a Dremel. When using the cutoff wheels, make sure the work is secured and use both hands on the tool; I hold the body in one hand and guide the nose with my fingers on the other hand. Take small bites and use a gentle feed pressure, letting the wheel do the work instead of forcing it. Forcing it will wear it out more quickly and big bites can shatter the wheel. Be sure to wear eye protection; a dust mask is also a good idea.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TrYzRAID View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ragsters View Post

I like using what is called a nibbler. It is slow but works great and its cheap.
I take it a nibbler is some kind of metal cutting scissors??
Nibblers are a bit like an open sided square hole punch for thin metal. Think 18+ gauge. Some might be able do 16 gauge softer materials like aluminum, copper or brass. What they do is take a bite out the material and to make long cuts you have to repeat the process nibbling your way through the material. I have one and used it to make a 1 inch cut in a piece of 20 ga stainless and gave up. It's tedious and will wear out you hands. That's probably why the old guy I got it from just gave it to me.



If you want a pair of metal scissors look for shears or tin snips. These also take some skill to get good with. There are different types for making different cuts, left handed turns, right handed turns and straight cuts. Otherwise you run the risk of turning you work piece into a twisted mess.

 
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