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Hello, i'm trying to find a good faq that explains Ram and DDR,SDRam and DDR2 and the different speeds like PC 4000 and such. I really want to start understanding this better.thanks
 

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Here you go:<br><br><a href="http://www.howstuffworks.com/ram.htm" target="_blank">http://www.howstuffworks.com/ram.htm</a><br><br>
and:<br><br><a href="http://articles.networktechs.com/printer-1.html" target="_blank">http://articles.networktechs.com/printer-1.html</a><br><br>
The second article is especiiallyinsightful for RAM timimngs.<br><br>
Sorry for the edit: DDR and DDR2 are 2 different architectures insofar as physical and speed. DDR2 is twice as fast and is 240 pin as opposed to the 180 pin on DDR. They are not interchangeable. The PCXXXX is an indicator to the Mhz at which the sticks operate.<br><br>
Hope that this helps!
 

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Originally Posted by <strong>Syrillian</strong>

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<div style="font-style:italic">The PCXXXX is an indicator to the Mhz at which the sticks operate.</div>

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</div>Not quite, mate....the PCxxxx number is a general indicator of that memory's bandwidth in Gb/s (gigabits/second). It's the DDR/DDR2 xxx which indicates the memory's frequency.<br />
<br />
In example: DDR<u>400</u> is also known as PC-<i>3200</i>; it operates at double the base clock of 200 Mhz --> <u>400 Mhz</u>, and it has a general ability to reach transfer speeds of <i>3.2 gigabits per second</i> (or is it gigabytes?). DDR333 is a.k.a. PC-2700, as it hits 2.7Gb/s and runs at double 166Mhz --> 333Mhz, etc.<br />
I believe this numbering convention also holds true for DDR2.<br />
<br />
No harm, no foul though. <img src="/images/smilies/biggrin.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Big Grin" class="inlineimg" />
 

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Originally Posted by <strong>[)[email protected]</strong>

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<div style="font-style:italic">Not quite, mate....the PCxxxx number is a general indicator of that memory's bandwidth in Gb/s (gigabits/second). It's the DDR/DDR2 xxx which indicates the memory's frequency.<br />
<br />
In example: DDR<u>400</u> is also known as PC-<i>3200</i>; it operates at double the base clock of 200 Mhz --> <u>400 Mhz</u>, and it has a general ability to reach transfer speeds of <i>3.2 gigabits per second</i> (or is it gigabytes?). DDR333 is a.k.a. PC-2700, as it hits 2.7Gb/s and runs at double 166Mhz --> 333Mhz, etc.<br />
I believe this numbering convention also holds true for DDR2.<br />
<br />
No harm, no foul though. <img src="/images/smilies/biggrin.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Big Grin" class="inlineimg" /></div>

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</div>I stand corrected...thank you sir. I was in a hurry this am before running off to work...sorry for the glib answer.
 

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also ddr2 isnt "twice" as fast as ddr , in mhz terms, yeh maybe but when you consider timings its a whole different game <img src="/images/smilies/smile.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Smile" class="inlineimg" />
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Syrillian</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I was in a hurry this am before running off to work...</div>
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Like I said, no harm no foul..... I can't count the number of times I've been in a hurry and given an off-kilter answer. We all do it, Syrillian.<br><br>
And besides, we all knew what you meant anyway.<br>
I just figured _Floyd_ (and whomever else) would benefit from a fuller answer on top of yours. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Smile">
 
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